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Crycheeseburger, In-N-Out in Korea

If you've lived in California, you've probably tasted In-N-Out and thought it was one of the best burgers you've tried for the ridiculous price they're sold for. If you've lived anywhere else, you've probably never tasted it albeit constantly hearing about it and have only tried it occasionally upon a California visit. Fortunately, I had the honor to live in the state that offers this delicacy and live only a couple blocks away from a joint. I had it almost weekly with my family like many other families seemingly did. I had it so frequently that I took having this wonder for granted because I knew it wouldn't be leaving me and I wouldn't be leaving it anytime soon. Then I came to Korea, and it was a crave that I've ceaselessly had. With burgers from the most common franchises ranging from 3,000 to 6,000 won and being formerly refrigerated, that crave only became stronger. To get anything close to what In-N-Out offered, I had to go to those handmade burger places and pay almost double the price of the refrigerated ones. For that reason, I never really ate burgers coming to Korea. I can confidently say it was because In-N-Out had already won me over once. After two years since my last Double-Double and animal fries, I received a text from someone who simply sent me a series of pictures of food. It wasn't any kind of food though. In whatever angle or zoom I saw it, it was definitely the familiar burgers I had loved back in Los Angeles. The inner brown wrapper inside the outer white and red wrapper with the familiar letters that identified each burger.. the white mini tray that holds the fries with "Fresh Potatoes" encrypted on one side.. most significantly, the tiny yet even visually explosive yellow chilies in the tiny plastic bags.. It was In-N-Out in Korea. It was under a different name though. It was called Crycheese Burger. Similarities between Crycheese and In-N-Out are largely drawn from their food, not at all from the way the restaurant actually looks. The exterior design of this restaurant is not a tad bit similar to In-N-Out's palm trees or the all white walls. Similar to most In-N-Outs, however, it does have huge windows (Crycheese actually only has one ... ) that blatantly show everything inside, but nearly all restaurants in Korea the size of Crycheese have a large window in the front like that so it's hard to say that's a similarity. In conclusion, there's just no similarity judging from the cover of this book. The interior design of the restaurant doesn't resonate too deeply with an In-N-Out either since you won't find the all-too-famous "Quality You Can Taste" slogan anywhere. Rather, it will look very much like any independent regular handmade burger place in Korea. It only started a few months ago, so there's not too much to expect in terms of design.