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Enterprise Mobility 2018 in Review

The general consensus within the Enterprise Mobility industry is that 2019 was the year of the Mobile Device. We have seen the mainstream publicity of the Bring Your Own device debate along with the recognition of both Apple and Google that they have an opportunity to target the Enterprise along with their more traditional consumer markets. We have also seen HP decide to bail out of the Computing and Mobile Device Market (and then dive right back in…… unsurprisingly) MDM (Mobile Device Management) has also dominated industry news with organisations seeking to remotely control multiple devices. This is especially true for those organisations who have recently implemented BYOD as it means that organisations have to manage multiple differing devices to the same standards. This goes to illustrate how organisations are generally looking to implement a strategy for Enterprise Mobility as against just giving staff mobile devices with no aim or objective. 2018 also saw the usual glut of new devices and technological partnerships such as new Android devices like the Galaxy S 2 and the re-imagined Motorola Razr, which has been supported by the acquisition of Motorola by Google. These new devices have also seen an increase in the technological capabilities of mobile devices with improvements in processing power, scanning and camera resolutions, screen quality and memory sizes. All of these improvements have led to application developers being able to really take applications into the realms of wildest imagination for the first time, with new mobile applications being able to replicate virtually all business processess without the need for workers to return to base to transfer large amounts of data.

What’s Next? – Enterprise Mobility in 2019

As we discussed in the previous blog, 2019 was an impressive and significant year for Enterprise Mobility with organisations adopting Mobile Strategies like never before and with device capability and selection being at never before seen levels. Some have even gone as far to suggest that it was the year that Enterprise Mobility came of age, and in truth it’s hard to argue with this theory when you look at the number of organisations adopting Enterprise mobility strategies and investing in mobile devices. We’ve seen numerous reports of industries such as the Pharmaceutical industry stockpiling mobile devices and companies such as BA testing iPads for their Cabin Crew and Pilots. So what for 2019 then? Simply more of the same? Well, it seems to me that, there will obviously be more of the same but more excitingly, there will also be the natural evolutions of organisations strategy: from devices to Apps and device management. Certainly many organisations will look towards Enterprise Mobility for the first time in 2012, but a great many who have already dipped into the mobile entity will be looking to further develop their strategies. This is likely to mean a greater emphasis on security which will lead to MDM (Mobile Device Management) becoming increasingly important, especially as organisations look to roll out a greater number of users and processes. Readers may also be interested in How to Developing an applications, Become a Software Developer Helper. Read more info in our developer Queen Mastropietro.

BBC Radio Debate Featuring CommonTime CEO Ian Knight – Enterprise Mobility

Last week several CommonTime employees had the privilege to be invited to a live Radio debate on the local economy. Part of the reasoning for this was that CommonTime CEO Ian Knight was a member of the four man panel, and was representing the high tech industry in the area. The event organised by BBC Radio Derby and The Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire Chamber of Commerce was designed to provide a format for local businesses to discuss economic issues in the area and how it can progress and develop. The panel of experts were tasked with difficult questions regarding the future of the City of Derby including how skill shortages might be addressed and how we could ensure that our fledgling high tech sector can be allowed to continue to grow. I think the main points that can be taken from the event are really quite positive. Derby as a city has some great industry and a motivated workforce which is looking to learn and develop. There are also a number of development opportunities which will see new industry brought to the city. One of the biggest challenges is the shortage of skills both locally and more nationally. In particular we have faced the challenge of recruiting for particular technical skills for example in software development. Ian Knight spoke passionately about the need to work with local authorities to ensure that young people in education are not only coming out with a good solid education but with the technical skills they require to be a success in their working life. This seems especially important within the Enterprise Mobility sector as new skills are constantly being developed to ensure that the UK remains at the forefront of the industry. It is anticipated that the industry will grow considerably over the next few years and this in turn will mean that a greater number of people with the right skills will be required. As an organisation CommonTime are expected to continue to employ this coming year and as such there will be a need for new skills here. We believe firmly that if this industry is to grow into its capabilities we need to be training and developing the skills now.

Android mobile apps development is more favored by Developers

Over the years, Android has become a favourite among users but also has gained the place of preference among developers. One of the core reasons behind it being so popular is its open source nature and customisations that iot brings to the table. Over all it offers a complete diversification of platform independence as compared to its rivals. There is no denying the fact that google play has been expanding over the years and has become the most versatile database of mobile applications overtaking Apple app store. The Android platform has been based on the principles of open source and allow user integrated customisations which has boosted it to the top spot among end users. Experienced developers prefer Android for various fundamental reasons. As per the reports, Android is chosen by 34.4 percent of developers while iOS is chosen by 32.7 percent of developers. This percentage comes down to 17.3 for HTML5 mobile apps and 4.5 percent for Windows. Over 84 percent of developers prefer Android tablets for developing apps to iOS as well as Windows. The dominating market share of Android is the major reason why developers are attracted to the platform. Moreover, there are many other reasons also why developers are driven towards Android : 1. It offers greater access and customization 2. It has a greater level of integration between applications and the platform Android has always provided a safe ground for newbie developers by offering them tools and services to jump the android bandwagon. The core issue with Apple is its tightly woven ecosystem, which makes it difficult to leave but Android has a plus point because of being open source. So unless users are looking for Apple’s hallmark, Android could certainly be better mobile OS choice for them.
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Dynamic Grouping with Kendo and SQL

For a while now I’ve been building dashboard objects for some specific projects in the HTML5/jQuery framework – Kendo UI. Coming from an Xcelsius/Crystal Reports/SSRS development background, this has been a major change of approach for me with everything being accomplished purely in code. In my experience to engage users, dashboards need to be meaningful – presenting the right data to the right audience, and well formatted – using a clean and uncluttered layout and a tasteful colour palette. They also need to be responsive – loading quickly and reacting to user input without any drama. In this article I’ve written about a problem I came across while working on a customer project, and a slightly different way to go about resolving it. Changing Dates The brief for one of our projects was to create a dashboard that could display different time ranges based on a user selection. A very common request, and one we accomplished in Kendo by defining values in a user input and passing them back via our REST service to SQL stored procedures as a parameter to change our date range. The problem with this approach appears with any trend metric, where Kendo will default to a category axis label for each and every grouping. Fine if you have a sensible number of data points, but if you’re switching from a dashboard displaying a weeks-worth of data to one displaying a year, the effect on a trend chart is something like this…
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