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How to Look Like Stevie Nicks
Whether you love Stevie's solo stuff or are a die-hard Fleetwood Mac fan, you can't deny that the songbird had some killer style back in the day. From her peasant-princess 70's looks to her amped-up 80's style, I'm taking you through Stevie Nicks' style. (Special shout-out to @allischaaff for reminding me how inspirational Ms. Nicks' fashion has been!) 70's In the 1970's, Fleetwood Mac was fresh on the music scene, and Stevie Nicks was the gorgeous lead singer that had an understated bohemian fashion sense envied by all. Her half-up, half-down blonde hairstyle was embellished with eyebrow skimming bangs. She wore plenty of trends of the seventies from peasant blouses to bell-bottoms, but she kept them sultry and simple, often in black, white, or cream. 70's Stevie was not shy of accessorizing, however, and she layered on necklaces and chains as embellishment to her simple dresses and tops. A chain or two would add some subtle glamour to an otherwise breezy and lightweight bohemian look. These aviator sunglasses were also a common look, coyly tucked under her signature bangs. She often wore a kimono, scarf, or shawl draped over her arms for some stylish coverage. 70's For the cameras, Ms. Nicks hammed up her seventies style with brooches, halters, and her flippy, flippy hair. The flared jeans and platform heel combo was then and is now especially cool and relaxed looking, without seeming costumey. 80's ...and then came the 1980's, and our beloved bohemian goddess went through a bit of a transformation. If this is the look you're after, take a comb to your hair, and just start teasing. Gone is Stevie's fresh face, to be replaced with a bright lip and swept-on blush. There's something to say for Stevie's look in the 80's. Perhaps it was over-the-top and bolder than her demure 70's style, but she was also coming into her own and recording solo music at the time, which turned out to be a big success. Her signature pout stayed the same all along, she just added more or less to emphasize those blonde longs and her petite frame. 80's Stevie went in the glam route in the 80's, but merged the boldness of glitter and sequins with a witchy darkness that seperated her from cutsier girl groups of the decade. If you aren't afraid to try some big hair and sparkle, avoid color and drape yourself in feathers and sequins in black for the Stevie effect. "Stand Back" shows more 80's influence than her softer work (like Landslide) with Fleetwood Mac, but she also develops a more nuanced sound that sets her apart from 80's pop, and her dark and enchanting style shows this. Stevie Nicks has been aptly named the fairy godmother of rock. Throw on some layered necklaces and black sequins, and tease up your hair to channel your inner Stevie and feel the girl power course through your veins.
I Can't Believe It's Not ____!: Songs you didn't know were covers
Full disclosure: Neither butter nor its evil counterpart, I Can't Believe It's Not Butter!, have really anything to do with the rest of this card at all. But the name is just so damn catchy and malleable, so, forgive me. Moving on, I'm here to give some love to the original composers and performers of songs that you may not know deserve credit. Sometimes, a song gets buried for years, only to be picked up by a totally different artist (often in a different genre and style), and it's the second version that blows up. In lots of these cases, there is little mention of the original. Let's change that. I Can't Believe It's Not LED ZEPPELIN! Song: "Dazed and Confused" (1969) Original: Jake Holmes (1967) Eerily enough, Jake Holmes actually has some real Robert Plant qualities to his voice. Or maybe Plant ripped his vocal style off of Holmes just like he did one of his best songs. I don't know. Is nothing sacred? I Can't Believe It's Not AMY WINEHOUSE! Song: "Valerie" (2007) Original: The Zutons (2006) The Zutons are kind of a guilty pleasure of mine. They're a not-very-good mid-2000s Brit rock group, but something about the lead singer's voice is really appealing to me. Amy's version is damn-near perfect and is the basis of every A Capella group's top hit, but it wouldn't have been possible without The Zutons. Which is not something that you can say for many things in this world. I Can't Believe It's Not ARETHA FRANKLIN! Song: "Respect" (1967) Original: Otis Redding (1965) Ok, this one is legitimately surprising. I've heard the Otis version a million times and I didn't know that it was his song until recently. The two versions are really, really different, and each is awesome in its own right. It's hard to go wrong with Otis or Aretha. Everyone wins. I Can't Believe It's Not THE BEATLES! Song: "Twist and Shout" (1963) Original: The Isley Brothers (1962) The Isley Brothers didn't actually write this song - Phil Medley and Bert Burns did - but they were the first to chart the song, before The Beatles did a year later. Fun fact: The Beatles recorded Please Please Me, the record that contains this hit, in just 10 hours. Their producer knew that "Twist and Shout" would totally ruin John Lennon's voice because of its demanding style, so he saved it for last, with just 15 minutes of scheduled recording time left. Indeed, it totally blew out Lennon's voice, and, while the producer wanted to do a second take, Lennon just couldn't manage it. Ended up fine, if you ask me. I Can't Believe It's Not ELVIS PRESLEY! Song: "Hound Dog" (1956) Original: Big Mama Thornton (1952) Oh man! OH MAN! Who is Big Mama Thornton, and where has she been? This woman is a force! She also recorded "Ball n' Chain" before Janis Joplin made it a hit. Give the lady some love! This version is fucking awesome! But, yeah, Elvis's is better. Sorry Big Mama. Which one surprises you the most? Do you like the originals better, or the more popular covers? Music community folks: Reveal yourselves!