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Love It Or Hate It: Do You Like Art Museums?
Welcome to the Funny Community game, Love It Or Hate It! This game is really similar to Monday's 'No Good or So Good' food game - except this one deals a lot more with non-food things. Every week, I highlight a different thing that a lot of people either really love or really hate and see how our community feels overall! Last week, I asked you how you felt about scary movies. Out of the 63 who voted, 47 of you voted that watching horror movies was TONS OF FUN! Soooo... SCARY MOVIES WIN!!!! This week, I want to know: Do you like going to art museums, or do you find them really boring? Art museums began in the 17th century, when private collectors would share the work to the public. Since then, they've slowly turned into a popular school field trip ultimate destination. Still a lot of us, well... we just don't get the hype. But how do YOU feel about art museums? Debate, debate, debate! @Inaritricx @Taijiotter @wonyeop316 @AimeeH @XergaB20 @JustinaNguyen @Danse @RainaC3 @bnrenchilada @destiny1419 @arnelli @Luci546 @InPlainSight @Ash2424701 @GingerMJones @zwdodds @LenaBlackRose @misssukyi @TerraToyaSi @kneelb4zod @BrookeStam @RachelParker @JaxomB @ultraninja10 @reyestiny93 @MattK95 @MajahnNelson @petname83 @BluBear07 @melifluosmelodi @ZoilaObregon @GossamoKewen95 @TracyLynnn @TiffanyWallace @VixenViVi @DenieceSuit @ButterflyBlu @CelinaGonzalez @MaighdlinS @maddiemoozer @VeronicaArtino @iixel @TomHawthorne @DominiqueThomas @ElizabethT @RiggaFoster @AluSparklez @kvnguyen @chris98vamg @WiviDemol @animechild51 @2Distracted @cthulu @jazziejazz @JessicaChaney @shantalcamara @J1mbleJ4mz @Beeplzzz @carmaa10 @MayraYanez @Kamiamon @HeatherWright @MischiefK1ng @SeoInHan @ShonA @KennyMcCormick @MooshieBay @IMNII @Ikpoper @humairaa @ merryjayne13 @zoemvillarreal @lilleonz @ChristinaOMalle @AllieGrabowski @baileykayleen @KarleyFrance @Ticasensei
Art Field Trip: Japanese American National Museum's Hello Kitty Exhibit in LA
Yesterday, my friends and I were able to visit the Japanese American National Museum's Hello Kitty retrospective, "Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty", which opened in the LA-based museum last month. Running through April 26, the exhibit celebrates everything Hello Kitty to commemorate her 40th anniversary. From backpacks and notebooks to toasters and even motor oil, the variety of products that have featured Sanrio's most iconic character is seriously staggering. Here, you get to see some of the most impressive of these. You even get to see Hello Kitty outfits and accessories once worn by celebrity Kitty fans ranging from Cameron Diaz to Katy Perry. (You can even get up close and personal with a Lady Gaga performance dress made of nothing but Hello Kitty stuffed toys!) But perhaps my favorite part of the exhibit is a complete art gallery filled with paintings, sculptures, and interactive works all inspired by Hello Kitty. The artists featured represent both American and Japanese artists, and include such popular ones as Audrey Kawasaki, Gary Baseman, D*face, and Yoskay Yamamoto. Check them out in the attached pictures! Photo 1: The 'halfway point' of this two-story exhibit Photo 2: "Hi Kitty", Audrey Kawasaki Photo 3: "Much Loved Kitty", Mark Nixon Photo 4: "Uh Oh Kitty Ho", D*Face Photo 5: "Hello Kitty Kaiju", Mark Nagata Photo 6: "Space Kitty", Yoskay Yamamoto Photo 7: "Melty Kitty Dream", Buff Monster Photo 8: "Hello Kitty in Bloom", Michael Courville Photo 9: "Play Date", Gary Baseman Photo 10: "Hello Lincoln", Scott Scheidly
George Ohr: Mad Potter of Biloxi
Ohr was brought into the world in Biloxi, Mississippi, on July 12, 1857. George Ohr has been known as the first art potter in the United States, and many say the best. The so-called "mad potter of Biloxi" is known particularly for his extraordinary capacity to make dainty walled jars on a potter's haggle different procedures for misshaping a piece's shape—e.g., winding the jar to make an undulating design, leveling the opening in fragments to get a pie covering impact, squeezing the edge and bowing it in a grouped lace impact, and so forth In 1881-2, beginning in New Orleans, Ohr jumped on cargo prepares and halted in 16 states to visit each potter he could discover. In 1883, in Biloxi, he assembled his first ceramics. A productive specialist, he is said to have made more than 10,000 pots in the course of his life. Ohr was brought into the world in Biloxi, Mississippi, the child of youthful German outsiders, Johanna Wiedman and George Ohr. The two Alsatians, the Ohrs had moved to Biloxi after a concise stop in New Orleans, their port of passage in 1853. George Ohr Sr. set up the primary smithy shop in Biloxi and later opened the principal supermarket there. His child, George Edgar Ohr, would grow up to be a showy, devoted potter, and a noteworthy figure in his old neighborhood. George Ohr pottery for sale is available which was capability done yet with no trace of his later virtuosity in making fragile, innovative pots. Ohr's sculptural pots squirming structures that were creative, inventive, and required extraordinary specialized expertise were scorned by craftsmen of the Arts and Crafts Movement, the ceramics local area, and individuals of Biloxi the same. Regardless of this, Ohr sought after his work decisively and had the certainty and rave to coordinate. Yet, it wasn't until fifty years after his demise that others started making up for lost time. George Ohr pottery is famous worldwide, some people call it as the pottery of a mad potter. After he had taken in his art, he left New Orleans for a two-year, sixteen-state visit through stonewares in the United States to gain proficiency with everything he could about the calling. He got back to Biloxi and assembled his ceramics shop himself. He created the entirety of the ironwork, made the potter's wheel, the furnace, boated blunder downriver, sawed it into sheets, and built his shop. Joseph Meyer had shown him how to utilize the common assets around Biloxi, how to find and burrow earth from the banks of the close by Tchoutacabouffa River. Ohr paddled his dinghy up the stream, burrowed the dirt, and drifted his heap down the Tchoutacabouffa. At the point when his furnace and supplies were prepared, he took a stab at the potter's wheel creating commonsense things like containers, mugs, grower, window boxes, and water bottles. He figured out how to create better work, too. Ohr alarmed the workmanship world at the 1885 World's Fair in New Orleans with his exceptional pots. He showed around 600 pieces, which were taken before he could get them back to Biloxi. One great result of the World's Fair was his romance and union with a youthful German lady whom he had met in New Orleans, Josephine Gehring. Before long a short time later, Meyer again welcomed Ohr to work with him at the recently made New Orleans Art Pottery. For a very long time, 1888 to 1890, Ohr worked in New Orleans tossing immense nursery pots. After the New Orleans Art Pottery left business, Ohr got back to Biloxi and again went into genuine creation for himself. Biloxi Art and Novelty Pottery, as he called his pink shop, in a matter of seconds was packed with vessels, everything being equal, sizes, and enrichments, "rural, elaborate, new and old molded containers, and so on" As he made his pots, he likewise made himself. Ohr introduced himself as an uncontrollably flighty individual reckless, devilish, wearing streaming facial hair and hair, and snaring his mustache over his ears. He gave his business a festival air.
3 Stylish Looks Perfect For A Spring Day At The Museum
Museums and spring just go hand in hand. If you have the right company along your side, museums can be a lot of fun. Don't get me wrong, going to your favorite museum solo dolo is still worth it -- but two is always better than one. Whether you're going to the fashion museum or the art museum, you'll gain both inside and a new perspective on beauty. The main thing is knowing how to dress when museum hopping. You don't want to be too cas, but you don't want to look like you're going to the Met Gala either. In this case, you want to be comfortable yet cute -- which should honestly be everyday. While you'll be feasting your eyes on the masterpieces around you, you'll want to be seen as a masterpiece as well. If you're planning a trip to the museum sometime this spring and aren't too sure what to wear, keep scrolling and check out three perfect museum looks below. Museum Look #1: Quite possibly my favorite out of the three, this look is chic-cas. Not too formal, yet not too laid back. The lace trimming on the dress brings a sense of femininity to the look alongside the pink nail polish. The leather jacket and boots bring out the edge and the hat adds a boho feel. Museum Look #2: The jumpsuit, my go-to outfit on anyway. The denim gives the jumpsuit a more casual feel while the hat and boots bring the entire look together which screams boho all day. Perfect to wear to the museum on a warm spring day. Museum Look #3: The most casual of the three, this look is for that woman who likes to be stylish yet laid back. You can never go wrong with flannel, boyfriend jeans and a cute pair of boots. Which look would you gravitate towards first? Remember, you're going to the museum. @nicolejb @waanderer @EasternShell @MyAffairWith @sophiamor @Cle1 @alywoah @TessStevens @jazziejazz @amobigbang @2Distracted @jlee37 @AshleyPatterson @shannonl5 @LizArnone @primodiva93 @LAVONYORK @humairaa