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Why Medicaid fails to provide reliable non-emergency medical transportation

Medicaid fails to provide reliable non-emergency medical transportation, state report finds Audit: 32 acts of potential mistreatment of at-risk Colorado adults were never reported! The state department that administers Colorado’s Medicaid program failed to provide proper oversight of its contracted transportation service, and didn’t report incidents that could have involved mistreatment of at-risk adults, according to audit results published Monday. Some of the 32 unreported incidents potentially involved drivers “not safely securing (Medicaid) recipients into vehicles, resulting in recipients falling out of their seats,” Stefanie Winzeler, team leader at the state auditor’s office, told state lawmakers on the Legislative Audit Committee. “This could be caretaker neglect due to the provider not securing or providing adequate physical care to the recipient.” The Department of Health Care Policy and Financing administers Colorado’s Medicaid program, which provides health care coverage to 1.5 million low-income people and people with disabilities. The state is required to provide non-emergent medical transportation, or NEMT, to Medicaid recipients who need help getting to their scheduled appointments. The federal government reimburses Colorado 50 cents for every $1 the state spends on NEMT services. From July 2020 to August 2021, the department contracted with the broker IntelliRide to run the NEMT program statewide. This included coordinating transportation for Medicaid recipients, paying transportation providers, and billing the department for reimbursement, according to the audit report released Monday. IntelliRide, which is part of the global public transportation company Transdev, was paid $2.9 million to administer the program.
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Find the Best EHR With This Checklist

Are you still searching for that "perfect fit" when it comes to your EHR software? The childhood fairy tale Goldilocks and The Three Bears comes to mind when anyone discusses the perfect fit. One may be too large, another too small, but the simplicity of the story offered “one” as being “just right!” It isn’t just a childhood story to expect the same outcome within your practice. How might that storyline unfold if our main characters were from a small-to-medium size medical practice searching for the perfect electronic health record (EHR)? The “just right” EHR should: Meet the needs of your specialty and unique workflow requirements. Look for templates that are specialty-specific and offer the ability to display the available templates based on the individual specialty of the provider. Within the note, look for the ability to retain the provider’s style both in content and process. Can you incorporate free text, drop-down, point click, by exception dictation, and even Dragon or other voice recognition workflows within the same note? Are you able to add and remove sections or even change the options within a designed picklist on the fly? Provide a flexible appointment scheduling module. An EHR system should accommodate your scheduling needs. It should recognize the need for appointments to be scheduled, modified, rescheduled, and deleted, even as a reoccurring block of appointments. Maybe your practice needs more flexibility to accommodate walk-in patients, the virtual patients, or the ability to recall a patient for an annual wellness visit. Will the system accommodate these appointment types? And when those appointments are scheduled, can you view a single day across multiple providers on the same screen?