YinofYang
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Center Stage with Artist: Benoit Godde

His site [http://benoit-godde.cghub.com/] Benoit Godde is a concept artist working at Quantic Dream. He is responsible for art work for games: Heavy Rain, Beyond, and the cancelled Eight Day. His work is really fantastic and has its own style. I love the robot.
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Juiced Eliminator Review (PSP)
When Need for Speed came burning onto the PSP we were shocked not only by the speed but the pure raw power of the PSP in running such a complex racer. Never after watching NFS run did I think I would feel the same way about a racer but I was oh so very wrong. Juiced eliminator is THQ’s masterwork on the PSP pushing out visuals that not only rival its XBOX and PC older brothers but also push the limits and perceptions of what we all thought the PSP was capable off. When it comes to racers Juiced eliminator is a cunning mix of simulation, street styling, arcade style handling and customization all put together in a very well rounded package. It comes with a staggering array of options that at first glance will have the modding nuts foaming at the mouth and the rest of us wondering where to start. Unfortunately, some of the other innovations in game play – like the respect system- didn’t fare so well. It’s only natural in the heat of a race to hit your rivals or scratch up your paint job while taking a tight corner and to suffer in terms of respect for such actions, almost to the point of making some races pointless. Fortunately you can now instantly retry any race you messed up, which eliminates the need to try and start from scratch again. Even if you don’t, with the newly modified ‘respect-o-meter’ you can keep a close tab on your various rivals. Also newly modified and refined career mode and the calendar makes earning the money for those new shocks you have been after so much easier. On top of that add a huge assortment of new tracks and a garage full of new cars and more pimp options than you can shake a jeweled cane at, and you have something that’s more than just a basic PS2 to PSP port. One of the biggest problems to boot was the haphazard betting system with its race fees. It’s a risky set up that if you lose, you not only lose respect but also privileges in your garage and even other races. Thankfully this has been completely overhauled and none of these seem to be present in this version of the game. With the retry option only a button press away, losing the bet becomes a lot more fun. Sadly, I do have one big gripe with Juiced Eliminator. Despite fluid looks and an excellent handling dynamics the game feels a little slow in comparison to other racer games. When you add this to slightly glitchy sections on the more complex tracks and you have the gaming equivalent of putting factory spec brakes on a nitro fueled 660BHP custom racer, this is something that cannot be forgiven in such an otherwise polished game and I for one hope it will be eliminated in further incarnations of the series. Graphics – Bright as neon and as hot as nitro in a pimped out ride 8/10 Sound – Some excellent music tones; the game plays well with some fantastic engine sounds and screeching brakes 8/10 Controls – Adaptive and well suited to the feel of customization 9/10 Gameplay - Although not as fast as Ridge Racer or Burnout it handles more like a simulator than an arcade racer 8/10 Difficulty – Early races will have you thinking your unbeatable, how wrong you will be in later races 9/10 Multiplayer Options – AD-HOC racing is always fun, but racing your freshly pimped ride against a friend is something else 9/10 Replay Value – A true sense of satisfaction can be had from taking a scrapper and turning it into a ‘pimp my ride’ special and running your rivals into the ground. This is a game you will play again and again just for this feeling 9/10 Overall – A little slow at times with occasional glitches; These can be annoying but they fail to detract from what is a truly exceptional racer 9/10 By https://www.karynamcglynn.com/
A Famous Female Sculptor: Barbara Hepworth
Barbara Hepworth studied sculpture at the Royal College of Art along with Henry Moore. In 1928, Hepworth and Moore, along with her friend and fellow artist Richard Bedford, became the leaders of this new method of direct carving sculpture. In 1932, she and her then-husband Ben Nicholson mounted a sculpture exhibition declaring their move to abstraction and joined the group, Abstraction-Création, and became the driving force behind constructivism. When World War II hit London, Hepworth escaped to St. Ives in Cornwall, but she worked to form an artist group that brought international recognition to St. Ives artists after the war. Hepworth exhibited extensively and was committed to producing many public works, including One Shape for the United Nations in 1964. Barbara Hepworth sculpture for sale are available online. Her work included smooth curves and a creative exploration of negative space. Hepworth was born into a middle-class family in Wakefield, Yorkshire, at the turn of the century. Her father was a civil engineer who became a county surveyor. Barbara Hepworth artwork was obvious from the start and he received a scholarship to the Leeds School of Art in 1920. It was here that he met sculptor Henry Moore, perhaps the best known of contemporary artists of this era. There is no doubt that he was a great influence on his work, but it is likely that it was a two-way process. From here he won an additional scholarship to the Royal College of Art and received a diploma in 1923. The following year, Hepworth stayed to compete for the Prix de Rome. She lost to John Skeaping, who would become her husband. After a period in Italy, Hepworth and Skeaping returned to settle in London, where they both gained reputations and portfolios. Although the couple had a son, Paul, in 1929 their relationship failed to survive and they divorced in 1933. It was during this period that she met artist Ben Nicholson with whom she would eventually move to St Ives. In 1934, Hepworth and Nicholson became parents of triplets; Simon, Rachel, and Sarah Hepworth-Nicholson. Four years later the couple married and shortly after, with the outbreak of war, she moved to St Ive's, first settling in Carbis Bay. While Hepworth was largely concerned with family life, Nicholson became an influence for emerging local artists such as Peter Lanyon, Terry Frost, and John Wells, who formed the separatist Penwith Society of Artists. After this hiatus, Hepworth returned to the art world with a series of exhibitions and commissions in London. By the late 1940s, the relationship between her and Nicholson had begun to falter. In 1949 she purchased Trewyn Studio (now the Barbara Hepworth Museum) and moved there in 1950 and divorced Nicholson in 1951. Barbara Hepworth lived and worked at Trewyn Studio for the rest of her life and it was during this period that she produced most of her best-known works of hers. She found the studio inspiring, writing, 'Finding Trewyn Studio was a kind of magic, here was a studio, a patio and a garden where she could work outdoors and in space.' It was around this time that Barbara Hepworth began to move from her preferred medium of stone and wood towards the bronze that we most associate with her. Many of these castings still remain in St Ives, either at the Trewyn studio or at various locations in the city. The space provided by working outdoors also allowed her to scale up her work. In 1953, Hepworth's eldest son Paul was killed in a plane crash in Thailand while serving in the RAF. There is a moving monument in the chapel of the Madonna of the church of St Ia, Madonna and Child (Bianco del Mare) that Hepworth carved out of stone. During the 1960s, Hepworth consolidated his status as an internationally recognized artist with works such as "Single Form", whose casting is located outside the United Nations building in New York. This perforated shape is very representative of the style for which Hepworth is best known. Along with Henry Moore, it is Barbara Hepworth who can claim the influence of the hole in modern sculpture. Explore Barbara Hepworth sculptures and her other artwork in bidsquare which will make you amaze. In 1965, at the age of 62, Hepworth became Dame Barbara Hepworth (Commander of the British Empire) for her contribution to the contemporary art world. The same year she was also appointed a trustee of the Tate Gallery in London. Hepworth continued to work until the 1970s at the Trewyn studio. However, tragedy struck on May 20, 1975 when Hepworth died in a fire in her study, believed to have been caused by a cigarette that set her bedding on fire. She had been seriously ill for some time before her death, but the accident was a shock nonetheless. Barbara Hepworth is buried in Longstone Cemetery in Carbis Bay with a simple slate headstone marking her grave. To bid for the artworks of this artist, see the artist page of Barbara Hepworth in Bidsquare.
Will Robots Steal Our Jobs?
So, I just read a staggering statistic that I think the rest of you would be equally WTF?! over. According to a study sponsored by the World Economic Forum, humans will be losing an approximate 5.1 million jobs to robots within the next five years. The study examined 15 different economies across the world, who combined make about 65% of the international workforce. Due to the upward trend of technology and service-oriented robotics, about 7 million jobs will be lost. However, 2 million will be gained due to the progress of technology in these different nations. As of right now, robots and machinery have begun taking over more general jobs, like cashiers. However, as they become more and more widespread, the World Economic Forum believes that these robots will become smarter and more specialized. "As entire industries adjust, most occupations are undergoing a fundamental transformation. While some jobs are threatened by redundancy and others grow rapidly, existing jobs are also going through a change in the skill sets required to do them." A Business Insider report backed up study, adding that the jobs they believe are most at risk are ones involving data entry or more clerical-style operations, including pharmacists, lawyers and paralegals, drivers, astronauts, store clerks, soldiers, babysitters, rescuers, and sportswriters. (The idea of astronauts being replaced by robots is seriously depressing to me. Space travel is so exciting because humans are doing it!) CNN also cited a Bank of America sponsored study that added more jobs to the list: bakers, butchers, tour guides, tax collectors, telemarketers, insurance sales agents, retail salespeople, clerks, accountants, and pharmacy technicians. It also added that the manufacturing industry will see a huge boom in robot workforce, increasing 35% by 2025. "To prevent a worst-case scenario – technological change accompanied by talent shortages, mass unemployment and growing inequality – reskilling and upskilling of today's workers will be critical. It is simply not possible to weather the current technological revolution by waiting for the next generation's workforce to become better prepared." The good news is that there are still plenty of jobs that are pretty unlikely to be replaced by robots any time soon. Anything involving the arts, empathy, or intuition - such as social work, teaching, or police work - require a type of human interaction that robots just can't replicate. (So next time you're teased about your 'worthless' liberal arts degree, feel free to let them know about the impending robot revolution.) So what do you guys think? Are robots really going to be taking over so much so quickly? Do you think the government should have any say over how much robotics is used? Let me know in the comments below, and for more WTF news, follow the WTF Street Journal collection.
Man Builds A Robot Scarlett Johansson Because, Obviously.
Here's some breaking news in the realm of Earth's impending robot takeover. It seems that one Hong Kong robotics enthusiast has fulfilled his 'childhood dream' of designing a robot and his (probable) adult dream of being able to hit on Scarlett Johansson by creating Mark 1, his very first humanoid robot. Okay, so Ricky Ma, the man in question, will not flat-out admit that Mark 1 was designed to look like Scarlett Johansson, but he does say that he was 'inspired by a Hollywood actress' which is probably dodgy robotics dude speak for 'I made a Robo-ScarJo.' The entire project cost Ma roughly $51,000 to create the robot, who was made mostly of 3D-printed plastics, silicone, and various hardware. Mark 1 has the ability to talk, walk, and make natural facial expressions - including a smirk when you tell her she's pretty. Because, of course, he programmed her that way. Yo, Ricky, you might want to cool off on hitting on Artificial Life ScarJo. (We've all seen 'Her'. We know how that'll end.) But anyway... Ma intends to sell the prototype to a major investor and help develop more and more versions of Mark 1, a robot he sees as extremely useful as our technology capabilities only continue to evolve. Could you imagine a fleet of Robo-ScarJos built to help run our banks, medical offices, or even retail centers? How do you think Scarlett feels about this? Let me know what YOU think about Ricky Ma and his Robot Johansson below. And for more strange tech news, follow my Weird Science collection!
Rago Auction House: A Destination for Learners, Buyers, and Sellers of Arts, Antiques and Collectibles
Rago Auctions is the biggest and famous auction house in New Jersey. Since 1994, it has served a large number of merchants and purchasers with a solitary mix of worldwide reach and individual assistance. One of the top sale houses in the field of the twentieth-century plan since its origin, Rago's skill covers hundreds of years of artistic work, embellishing expressions, decorations, gems, silver, money, and ethnographic property. It is a globally known setting through which to purchase and sell. It is additionally an objective for the individuals who look to learn and share information about workmanship, collectibles, and gathering, offering free valuations for individual property (from a solitary piece to accumulations and homes), examinations, and closeout displays in-house and on the web. Thoughtfulness regarding dispatchers is of principal significance and customers appreciate direct admittance to accomplices and specialists all through the valuation, transfer, and closeout measure. Rago Auctions happily supports local arts and local area associations here and there in the Delaware Valley and consistently bands together with associations including the Historical Society of Princeton, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Nakashima Foundation for Peace, among numerous others. Rago Auction Lambertville New Jersey has become a leading auction house not only in Lambertville New Jersey but also in the world. In the mid-year of 2019, Rago's united with Wright (a closeout house situated in Chicago and New York), making a joined organization with $60+ million in merged yearly deals, a group of 75, and over a hundred years of business experience. Rago's expansive mastery in workmanship, gems, earthenware production, and domains and Wright's attention on the plan and the inventive show will better serve their customers and broaden their ability in the realm of craftsmanship and plan. The two houses will keep on working under their individual names while sharing innovation, skill, and showcasing endeavours. Tonal Sculptures by Harry Bertoia for auction at Rago. Rago Arts and Auction center had tonal sculptures of Harry Bertoia at auction. Harry Bertoia was a notable sound workmanship stone worker, visual craftsman, and furniture architect. The craftsman was brought into the world in Italy and moved to America at 15 years old. Bertoia attended a university with specialists like Walter Gropius, Charles and Ray Eames, and Eero Saarinen. In spite of the fact that Bertoia was keen on expressions and furniture plan, his genuine ability was in sound model. He frequently bowed or extended bits of metal while testing in his workshop. At the point when presented to contact or wind, these pieces made tempting sounds. The impending Rago sell off features different apparent models by Harry Bertoia. The feature is an untitled multi-plane development made for the First National Bank of Miami. The 1958 craftsmanship establishment is made with steel and canvassed in dissolve covered metal. Bertoia's son ambient figures produce distinctive and natural sounds that meditatively affect audience members. Likewise displayed is a work area made for David Solinger's law office by conspicuous wood stone carver Wharton Esherick. The 1954 pecan and cherry work area has an enormous extra room with drawers, retires, and sliding entryways. Prevalently known as the "Dignitary of American Craft," Esherick was known for diminishing the hole among expressions and artworks to restore interest in wood craftsmanship. The accessible work area is an unmistakable illustration of Wharton Esherick's Cubist and German Expressionist style. The closeout will include furniture from the Nakashima Studio by father-little girl team George and Mira Nakashima. A divider bureau by George Nakashima features the qualities of the American dark pecan with its unmistakable plan. Works from Albert Paley, Pierre Jeanneret, and others balance the list. Find few of the art of George Nakashima which were featured at auction. For more such auctions and their schedules, see the auction calendar of auctiondaily.
Me and my Katamari Review (PSP)
Foreword I probably would have never heard of Kamari Damashi if I didnt go to school in Japan for a year. One day I was in the dorm TV room looking through the boxes of games left for everyone to play and I found a copy of this unique and interesting game. After several days of almost non-stop play I called my brother in the states and told him to import this crazy title. after passing the katamari damashi virus to him he passed it to his friends and now everyone loves katamari damashi which is the title of the PS2 sequel for Japanese PS2. Amongst last Thursday's release day title was Boku no Watashi no Katamari Damashi (Me and My Katamari Damashi [sprirt clod or clump of soul]) Now after playing it for a while I can, I hope, post a decent Review. Gameplay Well Last time The King of all, your father, accidentally knocked all of the stars from the sky and left it to you, the dashing prince, to restore order by going to earth and rolling over all creation with with a sticky ball (katamari). This time the King of all and his family go to the beach for a vacation and submerged all of the islands. now its up to you and your friends to restore order by making new islands using katamari. Each level requires you to make a certain size ball in a certain amount of time so the King of all can create a new Island with it. This usually starts off with our tiny hero picking up thumbtacks which leads to erasers and pencils to cups to bottles to chairs to people to trees, cars, boats and so on for example one of the stages requires you to make a ball thats 10 meters in diameter so I started off picking up flowerpots and worked my way up to people and benches then trees boulders and cars then I was laying waste to a construction site picking up girders houses and machinery This game is insanely fun! Difficulty I was worried how this game ppsspp would translate to PSP with only one one analog stick instead of the two you get for PS2. This Time you use the digital pad and the Button Pad to control your character. Even This while almost like the PS2 controls could be a problem- or so I thought. After playing the Tutorial stage I had almost perfect control of my katamari and was ready to go. The stages can get pretty tricky and while its sometimes frustrating to run out of time before reaching the required time but its so much fun I don mind that much that I have to play again. Graphics This games graphics are Better than those for PS2 version which is to be expected seeing how the graohics are amazingly simple. They did a great job creating all of the objects you can pick up because this is a Japanese game there are tons of nostalgic japanese items you can pick up one which comes to my mind are the golden fish which can be found on the top of Nagoya Castle in the city I used to live in. Sound effects for picking up items and the helpless cries of animals and people are also well done (not serious cries of course) Sound This is one of the things that made me fall in love with this game when I first played it. When I first heard the Laa lalalalalaaa laalaa la I knew this game was a different form of action game. All of the original music done by Shigeru Matsuzaki are here plus new songs. This is one game I will be buying the soundtrack of before I go back to the states. AdHoc Mode This game supports four player mode. I have yet to find more people with this game but I'm going to hit up one of Sony's many show rooms (this one in Ginza, Tokyo) to check out upcoming PSP games. I imagine I can find some people who also have this game there. Replay Value With lots of Minigames, Presents including extra accessories for your character to wear, New stages, and tons of other Things to unlock this game will keep you rolling for some time (sorry) This is definately one to add to your PSP library of games. this game will definately make it to the next installment of the PSP the Best library. for those who can get a Japanese copy of the game this month you should be able to get a free huge Katamari Damashi PSP case. Whilel I dont know if I'll actually use it I couldnt help laughing when I got home and discovered huge dashing prince shaped carrying case that the gamestore cashier slipped it into my bag without me noticing- yet another reason to buy this one. Now if I can just get it away from my girlfriend Gameplay 10/10 Difficulty 10/10 Graphics 10/10 Sound 10/10 AdHoc TBA Replay 10/10 Overall score: 10/10