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Louder than Bombs: A Subtle Character Study of a Family

Louder than Bombs (Norwegian filmmaker, Joachim Trier's latest film) and its recently released trailer is nothing short of intriguing. The teaser is only about a minute in length (and that's if you round up) but, somehow, it sticks with you.
I'm not too familiar with Trier's work (his last film Oslo, August 31st, is one that has gotten a lot of critical acclaim) but in this short teaser, I think I can already consider myself a fan of his work. His shot selection and the way he tells the story visually is something that really excites me about the film (and the medium of film in general).
Trier establishes the setting and scope of the scenery very quickly with the use of his wide shots. Initially, this makes the audience feel far away -- almost as if they're viewing the events of the narrative from a different plane, it's kind of ethereal.
But by putting a close-up right after this wide shot of a road, Trier tells us that this is going to be a personal, small, character story. We don't get much dialogue from the teaser but what we do get is important. We can easily figure out that the narrative revolves around the matriarch of the family.
And at first, we aren't sure what happened to her. That is until the final shot of the teaser.
Trier makes us feel the accident that occurs at the end. It's so jarring in comparison to the rest of the trailer (which moves slow and quiet*). The line, "do you ever think about mom?" forces us to think about her character, we're greeted with another close-up and then immediately the shot of the car accident.
It still astounds me that Trier was able to fully engage me and my interest in less than a minute. It's amazing how film technique -- when used properly -- can affect the audience. Trier also adds a sense of wonder to his film. One of the thoughts I had while watching the last sequence was "how?"
It's a great feeling to have, especially since we live in an age now where it's so easy to computer generate certain effects. And even if the accident was computer-generated, it looks so real it makes your heart skip a beat.
Louder than Bombs doesn't have a US Release Date just yet. But it'll be in theaters in Norway in October.
*It's kind of beautiful the way Trier crafted this trailer. With a title like Louder than Bombs, one would expect to hear something jarring. But instead, Trier plays on our expectations in order to fully catch us off guard with that last sequence.
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oh man, this looks beautiful. I have no idea what to expect, but probably some tears.
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