2 years ago
greggr
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Rookie Moves by New Writers
I have shared articles from the always explicit Chuck Wendig at Terrible Minds before, but I really thought that this one was also worth sharing, entitled "I SMELL YOUR ROOKIE MOVES, NEW WRITERS." -> http://terribleminds.com/ramble/2015/08/26/i-smell-your-rookie-moves-new-writers/
Let me preface this by saying there's nothing wrong with being a rookie, and nothing wrong with making mistakes. But I think Chuck makes some interesting points, even if I don't agree with all of them.
NOT EVERYTHING IS INTERESTING
"At a rough guess, I’d say 90% of All Things Ever are uninteresting. Dull as drawing with white crayons on white paper. Things are boring. Life is boring. Details are mostly boring."
GET TO THE FUCKING STORY, ALREADY
"The story begins on page one.
Repeat: the story begins on page one.
It doesn’t begin on page ten. It doesn’t start in chapter five."
EVERY CHARACTER SOUNDS THE SAME
"Builds off what I was saying earlier about every character being her own shining beacon, separate from one another. And I think it’s pretty clear: if each character sounds like a replicant of the next, you’ve got a problem. "
I won't recount the whole article; you might as well just check it out yourself, but I will offer a piece of my own advice that differs from his: I keep thinking about his opinion of describing "every leaf." Personally, I enjoy books heavy with description and vivid word building. Can we not recreate every dress that graced the ballroom floors, or every uniform the officers adjusted as they stepped of trains to see their wives and children? We can recreate lift in description, and when done well, I like details.
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We can't always write what we feel, unless we know the shape within our mind.
a year ago·Reply