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Cheesecake Filled Chocolate Easter Egg
It's okay if you don't like eating real eggs because this recipe requires no eggs. The shells are made of chocolate with cheesecake fillings inside and passionfruit pulp as yolk. Ingredients: 6-8 hollow chocolate easter egg shells 150g (about 5oz) cream cheese, softened 30g (about 1/4 cup) icing sugar (confectioners' sugar), sifted 1/2 tsp lemon juice 1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract 125ml (about 1/2 cup) thickened/heavy whipping cream For the yolk: 1 passionfruit, 1 tbsp apricot jam, 1 tbsp (about 15g) unsalted butter (passionfruit juice can be replaced with about 2 tsp of freshly squeezed orange, mandarin juice or mango, peach nectar; adjust the amount of juice to taste). You can substitute any fruit curd. *recipe makes 6-8 regular size eggs Preparing Egg Shells Carefully remove the tops of the chocolate eggs. Keep them chilled in the fridge while you prepare the cheesecake filling. Making Cheesecake Filling Place the cream cheese, icing sugar, lemon juice and vanilla in a large mixing bowl and beat on high until the mixture is smooth and fluffy, about 3-4 minutes. Set aside and carefully whip the thickened cream in a separate mixing bowl to stiff peaks (don't over whip). Using a whisk, gently combine the whipped cream into the cream cheese mixture until it is smooth. Carefully spoon or pipe the mixture into the prepared chocolate shells. Chill eggs for at least 30 minutes to allow it to set. Making Passionfruit Sauce Strain passionfruit pulp to remove the seeds and place in a small saucepan with the apricot jam and butter. Gently heat on low, whisk until the butter melts and the mixture is smooth. Remove from the heat and allow to cool. Place in the fridge and chill until it thickens slightly. Assembling Carefully scoop carefully scoop out a hole in the centre of each cheesecake, about 1 cm deep and wide. Fill it with sauce and return the eggs to the fridge to chill again for at least 30 mins. Serving Remove eggs from the fridge about 10 minutes before serving. Can be made 2-3 days in advance, keep eggs in the fridge in a holder inside an airtight container.
You'll Never Guess What People Eat At The Movies Across The Globe
Yuck. There are hundreds of countries around the world sitting in movie theaters across the globe. One big difference is the food they eat while in the audience. From dried bugs to salted candies, world customs really have their own distinct palette. Though Americans believe there's nothing in the world that could be better than a nice bag full of buttery popcorn, they are in for a huge surprise. Check out the movie theater snacks from around the world. You're going to be shocked. USA: Salted, Buttery, Popcorn It's crunchy. It's addicting. It's SO American. Popcorn is a very traditional snack without a ton of calories...that is, if you don't drench it in a pool of butter and salt. Popcorn has had a long standing reservation in our culture, primarily since corn is such in abundance within our country. We've muti-purposed corn to be just about anything but popcorn is still our favorite creation. Just remember, a small popcorn won't get you through intermission. A large popcorn will make you feel fat. But who cares, right? Great Britain: Sugared Popcorn Why am I not surprised that Great Britain would have a seamlessly more proper snack? Compared to American, the Brits always seem to do the exact opposite. From my personal view, I just don't understand the thrill of sugary popcorn. However then again, kettle corn and caramel corn is a huge success in the States. Brits are notorious for their bitter drinks such as coffee and tea paired with a very decadent and sweet dessert. I guess it's only fitting, pinkies up. Japan: Iwashi Senbei The first idea that popped into your mind was probably not that these are sardine rice crackers. The crisps are baked in sugar and soy sauce to give them their distinct taste. Rice is a very traditional food within the country so it's no surprise it is a snack as well. And with Japan being a very dependent country on its seafood industry, it's obvious that a leading snack brand would be fish based. Still interesting. Brazil: Roasted Ants Okay GROSS. As an American, I will never understand the love for eating bugs. We get it, they are packed with a ton of protein and have a nice crunch. But it's so taboo in American culture. On the other hand, Brazilians loves them. It's an aphrodisiac, or food that stimulates sexual desire, which could be the reason for why Brazilians are such a fan. Talk about a passive aggressive way to show your date that you want to hook up. Norway: Dried Reindeer Meat Somewhere in the North Pole, Santa is crying. This food seems so fitting though for the region. Reindeer meat is cut and then dried for a chewy taste. Very similar to beef jerky in the States. Reindeer meat boasts very low fat and high protein. However, I can't seem to feel sympathy for Rudolph & his gang once they find out that the Norwegians are snacking on their friends. Guess Norway is going to become the land of misfits toys soon enough... South Korea: Dried Cuttlefish I guess this goes hand in hand with popcorn in the Asian nation. With a meaty texture and briny flavor, apparently South Koreans can't get enough. It can be seasoned in a variety of flavors. Though they're also fans of roasted chestnuts, dried cuttlefish still frequently comes out as the fan favorite. I still don't know what a cuttlefish is. Russia: Beluga Caviar This is reserved for the rich and only the rich but a very common wealthy delicacy. Though the average folk may not be accustomed to eating the beluga caviar themselves, they know exactly who is receiving it when they attend the movie theater. Apparently movies in Russia are a more fancy affair, something Americans and other world countries would gawk at. With Russia being known to have extreme customs, this one tops the cake. Greece: Souvlaki Okay, this looks delicious. Lamb or beef souvlaki will be a fit for an Grecian attending an outdoor movie. They're tender and savory and it's already making my mouth water. Grecians are notorious for having the best food in the world and it's no surprise that their movie theaters also come with a wide delicious variety of choices. Please fly me to Greece because I'm starving. Netherlands: Salty Licorice This could be the most hated snack in America. Black licorice is a very distinct taste that very few people enjoy. In America, our black licorice contains a lot of sugar. However in the Netherlands, they salt their licorice with ammonium chloride which gives eaters a tongue-numbing sensation. Is this candy a drug? No thank you. India: Samosas This is my favorite. Look how good that looks! Bollywood theaters are all the rage in India far more popular than any Western movie. Samosas are potato stuffed pastries that taste as good as they look. With Bollywood movies comes a delicious combo of chutney and cheese sandwiches and vada pav, potato fritters in a bread bun. I could definitely ship this idea in the USA.
Bérénice Bejo : une princesse Disney très "Rebelle"
C'est aujourd'hui, mercredi 1er août, que sort en France "Rebelle", la nouvelle production des studios Disney-Pixar, avec en vedette Bérénice Bejo, la voix française de Merida, l'héroïne du film. C'est donc fort de la présence du César de la meilleure actrice 2012, que le nouveau long métrage d'animation des studios Disney-Pixar débarque dans les salles françaises face au mastodonte "The Dark Knight Rises", le troisième et dernier volet de la nouvelle franchise Batman. Une production qui risque de malmener l'homme chauve-souris. En effet, "Rebelle", sorti en salle le 22 juin dernier aux Etats-Unis, a engrangé selon l' "Associated Press" plus de deux cent millions de dollars de recette outre-Atlantique. Cette nouvelle princesse Disney, au caractère bien trempé, est interprétée en France par la belle Bérénice Bejo. L'actrice, consacrée grâce à sa participation au film "The Artist", réalisé par son compagnon Michel Hazanavicius, a donné en interview sa propre description de Merida : "C'est un garçon manqué. Elle a une démarche, une façon de se comporter, qui est très nature. Elle est censée être une princesse et là, tout d'un coup, elle dégage quelque chose de très sauvageon, de très petit garçon, de quelque chose qui n'a pas envie d'être enfermée. C'est une fille très intrépide. Assez moderne, je dirais." Pour rappel, "Rebelle" raconte l'histoire de Merida, une princesse écossaise qui refuse de suivre les ordres de sa mère, la reine et, forte de ses talents d'archères, décide de partir à l'aventure. Cliquez ici pour voir Bérénice Bejo nous parler de Merida et de son expérience sur le doublage de "Rebelle". credit : http://fr.news.yahoo.com