GalaxyTacoCat
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Travel Bucket List

Hey everyone! Ever sense I could remember I have always wanted to travel, it is my dream to see the world and experience everything earth has to offer. This is why I need your help:

Help me construct a bucket list by answering this question:


What is your most favorite place to go? (vacation or for other reasons)

Everyone can give as many places as you want but make sure that it is specific. So if you chose China; What part? Any specific things or places there that make it your favorite?

Thank you so much to any who participate, it means a lot to me and I hope one day I can cross off every one of your places off the list. :)

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Alaska! My grandparents were just up there, they said it was awesome! ;D
I would like to visit Norway to see the northern lights, New Zealand to see the satrs, Scotland for the Castles, Egypt to see the Pyramids. South Korea(well, this one's a stupid one actually!) to see Seo In Guk!!! Near home, I like the whole state of Sikkim very much & have been there like 7 times & would love to go there in the future too!!
if u are a nature lover and wanna experience different cultural & historical side u should go to NEPAL with the. top 8 biggest mountains u go either g trekking or sight seeing rafting or elephant safari where u can experience different cultural sites n historical site like LUMBINI birth place of Lord GAUTAM BUDDHA hindu temple PASHUPATI TEMPLE and SWAMBUNATH. U can enjoy typical Nepalese food daal bhat tarkari and many more. u can experience various Nepalese festival u have never experience which makes u feel home with their welcome. Overall it's a perfect place to e joy your vacation with family or with friends.
Okunoshima Japan aka. Bunny Island. It's an island overpopulated with fluffy bunnies! !! O(≧▽≦)O
My most favorite place to go is in Little Tokyo over in Los Angeles, California! ^^ It's so awesome and fun and there's costumes you can buy to cosplay as an anime character :D it's great!!! ^^
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