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Sriracha Buns

I have never had sriracha before. I have a sensitive palate, so I tend to avoid spicy foods. Not to say I don't like them, though...I have an unnatural fondness for wasabi, for example. (One of my friends described wasabi as "feels like battery acid eating it's way to your stomach", and I just HAD to try it!) I'm usually very open to trying new things, but sriracha is something that made me nervous. Today, I decided to break out of my comfort zone and make some sriracha knots.
(^^Not my image) I took a cautious nibble from the first roll. Wow! The flavor was intriguing...buttery (from the butter, obvs) and sweet and savory. I figured I must not have put as much sriracha in the drizzle as I thought. I was about to take a more daring bite, when my tongue was incinerated! It's a heat that really sneaks up on you and slaps you in the mouth. Yet, I couldn't stop eating it. I guess I'm just a masochist. XD
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do you have the recipe?
I used this recipe: http://www.thestayathomechef.com/2015/09/sriracha-knots.html?m=1 I went a little light on the sauce because of my unfamiliarity with it. In the dough, I replaced the sriracha with honey to try to lighten the punch (doesn't work out that way, lol).
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