AlloBaber
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Make Super Easy Curry – Just 30 Minutes!

Let's be real.

Getting a healthy, delicious dinner on the table can be a real chore sometimes, especially after a long, tiring day of work or school. That's why I'm always on the lookout for fast, easy-to-make recipes – then I've got no excuse NOT to eat healthy, homemade food!
You guys are going to love this simple curry – it takes just 30 minutes to throw together, and won't leave you with tons of dishes to wash. Plus, it's like multiple recipes in one – you'll see why! Keep this on hand for those nights when you're too tired to cook; the promise of this delicious payoff for so little work will motivate you to forget the takeout, and whip up some curry. :)

Step One: Choose Your Curry Sauce

Depending on whether you're in the mood for a savory, lightly spicy yellow Indian-style curry, or a sweet Thai-inspired mango curry, choose one of the sauces above. They're both equally simple to prepare!

Step Two: Choose Your Protein

Vegans, are you in the mood for quinoa? For vegetarians, perhaps some paneer cheese. Or, if you're a meat eater, lean chicken or turkey breast would go great with either sauce, and you can even try a flaky white fish with the mango curry. Adventurous vegetarians might want to try subbing in tempeh or another meat substitute!

Step Three: Choose Your Vegetables

Snow peas, peppers, broccoli, carrots, zucchini, green beans, potatoes, even eggplant or butternut squash – choose a mix of your favorite veggies!

Step Four: Cook It Up!

Follow the recipes below and whip up your satisfying meal! :) Note: If you chose quinoa as your protein, cook separately, and then spoon curry on top to serve.
Classic Yellow Curry
1 onion, roughly chopped
1 tsp each ground coriander, ground cumin, and ground turmeric
2 cans of tomatoes, chopped
a pinch of sugar
1 inch piece root ginger, peeled and finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 red chillies, deseeded and finely chopped
12-14 oz. reduced-fat coconut milk
juice of ½ lime
3 tbsp chopped cilantro
In food processor, blend onion, coriander, cumin, turmeric, and 6 tbsps of water to make a paste. Heat 1 tbsp of olive oil in a pan, and add paste, tomatoes, sugar, and 1 tsp of salt. Simmer, stirring often, for 5 mins. Stir in ginger, garlic, chili, and coconut milk. Bring to a simmer. Add protein. Cover and gently simmer for 5-15 mins (until protein is nearly cooked through). Add veggies. Remove lid and simmer over medium heat, about 5-10 minutes, until veggies and protein are cooked, and sauce has thickened slightly. Stir in lime juice and cilantro. Serve over rice or quinoa.
Sweet Mango Curry
1 onion, finely chopped
1 red pepper, sliced
1 tsp medium curry powder
2 tbsp tomato purée
1 cup vegetable stock
1 tbsp mango chutney
12-14 oz. chopped tomatoes in tomato juice
7-8 oz. baby spinach, washed
In a pan, heat 1 tbsp olive oil over medium heat and sauté onion and red pepper for 10 min or until softened. Stir in curry powder and tomato purée, and sauté for 30 secs. Add stock, chutney, and tomatoes. Simmer uncovered for 10 minutes. Add protein; simmer for 5-15 mins (until protein is nearly cooked through). Add veggies, and simmer for 5-10 minutes. Stir in spinach just before serving, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve over rice or quinoa.

YAY!

That's how easy it is to have a delicious curry dinner for you and the fam :) Hope you guys enjoy! Let me know if you give one a try – I wanna see pictures and hear all about the reactions :)
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you will probably love the one I just post too ㅋㅋ
Oh yes 💚🍲🍛
Alli you rock my world. Guess what I am cooking tonight
LOVE this, Alli! The hubby and I love curry. I prefer Thai curries over Indian at the moment. Funny though, it's one of the few foods I've not tried to cook for myself, although R always asks. Guess I know what's for dinner this weekend! YUM! XO
I'm so happy all of you guys liked this recipe card!!! :D When you give it a try, PLEASE take a picture so I can see your beautiful meal :D and remember to tag me!!
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