Hannah
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Un coffee shop en Corea

Relindo no? Pero mas importante: delicioso! XD
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mm me provoco
DE UNAS GANAS DE COMER UHHHHH QUE RICO
la verdad es q me dieron ganas de acavarme too el paspel
aahiii me dieron ganas de comer eso
rikisimos..
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Chocolate Chip (Perfectly Safe!) Cookie Dough Truffles
About two weeks ago, @vegantraveler posted the most hilarious card in her Vegan Laughs that really got me thinking. It had a picture of a vegan baker licking cake batter off a mixing whisk and bragging about how vegans get to eat all the batter they want! (Check it out over here: http://www.vingle.net/posts/586948-Why-I-love-Vegan-Baking) And it's true! While admittedly, I haven't been vegan or vegetarian in years (gasp), I do still eat vegan and vegetarian foods regularly and appreciate the added safety in plant-based recipes. With no egg, no meat, and no dairy, there's less risk of foodborne illnesses and a much longer shelf life. (It's also perfect in a potluck situation when you know it's going to be left out for a long time!) With that being said, you can share and enjoy these cookie dough truffles (made with vegan cookie dough) without all of the concern that usually comes along with eating raw dough. One of my sister's favorite activities to do each holiday season is make a huge batch of vegan truffles for friends, and this is certainly our most favorite! --------------------------------------------------------------- Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Truffles 2 1/2 cups all purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup (2 sticks) vegan butter or margarine, room temperature 3/4 cup granulated sugar 3/4 cup packed brown sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/3 cup soy or almond milk 1 cup mini semi-sweet chocolate chips 14 ounces of meltable chocolate (Ghiradelli and Godiva both make vegan melting chocolate, but other natural food brands do too.) 1. Beat butter and sugars and in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed until light and fluffy. Add cream and vanilla. Stir in flour and salt and mix on low speed (or by hand) until incorporated. Stir in chocolate chips. 2. Cover and chill dough for 1 hour. 3. When dough is firm enough to handle (it may help to lightly flour your hands), form dough into 1" balls and arrange on a baking sheet lined with waxed paper. Place sheets in freezer and let chill for 30 minutes. 4. Melt chocolate candy coating in a double boiler or in microwave according to package directions. Using forks or a dipping tool, dip cookie balls into candy coating to cover. Tap fork on side of pan to remove any excess coating, and return to waxed paper-lined baking sheets. Chill until set. Store, chilled, in an airtight container for up to 1 week.
Korean Winter Street Foods
Korea is proud of its food, but it REALLY proud of its street food. There are different foods depending on the season, and I have to say that winter is the best. Here's a list of foods you MUST TRY if you get the chance: 군고구마 (kun go-gu-ma) 군 means "roasted" and 고구마 is Korean sweet potato. The potato is roasted in a huge barrel oven, then handed to you with the skin still on. It's your job to peel it and eat the sweet goodness inside. You can buy an entire bag if you want! 호떡 (ho-ddeok) 호떡 is sort of a pancake/donut combination. It is fried dough filled with cinnamon, sugar, and occasionally nuts. It is flattened into a pancake shape and handed to you in a tiny paper cup. Be careful with the first bite because the inside are often boiling hot! (There are also vegetable versions but the dessert version is much better in my opinion!) 군밤 (kun bam) We just learned that 군 means roasted and now we learn another word: 밤 means chestnut! Just like in New York where there are roasted nut stands everywhere around Christmas time, the cold weather brings out the roasted chestnut vendors. 계란빵 (kye-ran bbang) 계란 means egg while 빵 means bread so voila! Egg bread! The bread part is similar to corn bread, but a little less corn-y and the egg is steamed on top to make a really, really delicious combo. It's my favorite street food after 군고구마 :D 호두과자 (ho-du kwa-ja) The small of this is unnnnbelievable! 호두 means walnut and 과자 means cookie or snack. Therefore 호두과자 is a walnut cookie! They are shaped like walnuts and filled with sweet red bean. You can buy these by the bag full too! 회오리감자 (hwae-o-ri kam-ja) LOOK AT THESE THINGS! They are called 회오리감자 because 회오리 means tornado and 감자 means potato. Behold the potato tornado! I have NO idea how you eat these :) Have you guys tried any of these? Which are your favorite? @NysA @xanderskissme @AmbieB @Jiyongixoxo @BabySheep @phantomsluvr @Rhia @VixenViVi @JohnEvans @RobertMarsh @ElizabethT @ArmyofKookie @shantalcamara @KittyKpop @jannatd93 @cthulu @HarperKennett @musicundefined9 @DekaraMiller @Mahealani @kpoplove89 @tannyo @IMNII @kpopisnylife @KoreanLove2 @lawtont @baileykayleen @oceanseokjin @Sammie99522 @RoyallyPrincess @heidichiesa @asterkimchee @CurrySoop @malibella @puppycatX0X0 @notgucci3 @Lizzeh @reallychelsea @JorgeRAMME @adikiller @blazinpurplehl @kvnguyen @lupemontserrat @ParkMinRin13 @peytoncarter2 @aguileragissel @FallingByeol @adritha13 @toughcookie @TesneemElAlami @VWolf12XOXO @ToyaH @aleciaLOVES @no5alive @AnnahiZaragoza @TravelSizedGirl @kthyl @Adetoro @linzi0302 @hahabts @primodiva93 @cindystran @Saeda1320 @misssukyi @preeta @Yearnin2learn @DorisMay27 @iforisabelle @TLeahEdwards @robertakm64 @azaraa @JeanNwagbuo @aliahwhbmida @WiviDemol @ariana2k @sosoaloraine23 @hisundays @3mmY4 @sukkyongwanser @asterkimchee @misssukyi @MandySpaulding @LatoyaHudson @Claymorex @SaraHelguero @thatkdramalover @sierradimes @TokkiGwiyomi @AnelVega @KaiTakashima @UKissMeKevin @jemitza @VWolf12XOXO @HuonTreeRoo @lovebluecolor @kel53 @JezziCrypt @LysetteMartinez @Fleurdemai00 @oxSoZeroxo @k0reanbbyq @ceramoore3 @YessicaCardenas @Kuramariin @jannatd93 @herreravanessa9 @WiviDemol @VixenViVi @Roxy1903 @NiaLuv19 @kmayong @Baekyeol27 @9thMuse @Ilikepancakes @CandaceJordan @RobertMarsh @KiKi29 @Rhia @AnnahiZaragoza @YGWinner @EllieDean @LizaNightshade @panouvang123 @sherrysahar @mistymaity @GuerlyReyes @maralatto @shantalcamara @paszikelly @SerenaMcG @unbreakable1109 @Diablo6 @YessicaCardenas @Tigerlily84 @JorgeRAMME @Bose @AegyoBunny @VivianCrespoMed @Airess95 @SHINee808 @DaisySalazar @Pickles440 @BryAnnaAhrens @CloverShadows @JordanShuler @ChrystalA @Diajuni @minsangu @TatyTheTot @GraceWatson @NickySerban @Sinique @AnaMata7397 @nightcoreanimen @KarlythePanda66 @KellyOConnor @trashlord @hyolouxx @Sarahwifi @JayDay @nettaj1013 @Miyukichan @XergaB20 @pharmgirlerin @JasmineWilliams @toughcookie @warjeensuleiman @DasiaB @talimarks @ckienitz @KeyBoss @ChristiMarie @YokoUdoran @hayesfordaze @KagamiTaiga @malibella @ocherrylimeadeo @DjKpop12 @reyestiny93 @ZeeRow
Love Girl Scout Cookies? Try This Homemade Thin Mints Recipe
Once in a while, I have a serious Thin Mint craving. Okay, scratch that. I have a serious Thin Mint craving every moment of every day. I've bought three boxes of shoddy, knock-off "Mint Thins" in the past two weeks (true story). But there's nothing quite like the original – until now. This recipe faithfully recreates this all-American favorite, down to appearance and texture. Folks rave about them. I haven't tried them yet, but I plan to as soon as possible. If you try your hand at putting those pesky Girl Scouts out of business (jk), let me know how it goes! Copycat Recipe: Thin Mints Cookie Ingredients 1 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 cup cocoa powder 1 cup powdered sugar 1 tsp. vanilla extract 3/4 tsp. salt 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour Coating Ingredients 16 oz. semi-sweet baking chocolate 1 1/2 tsp. peppermint oil 1.) Pre-heat the oven to 350°F. In a large mixing bowl, cream butter until it has a light, fluffy consistency. Add the powdered sugar; mix until combined. Stir in salt, vanilla, and cocoa powder. At this point, the mixture should resemble a thick frosting. Add flour, and mix until just combined. Do not overmix. 2.) Time to use your hands a little. Form the dough into a ball and knead a few times, then flatten it into a disk about an inch thick, wrap in plastic wrap, and place it in the freezer for 15 minutes. 3.) Once dough has chilled, remove it from the freezer and roll it out to a thickness of about 1/8 inch. For a classic look, cut out cookies with a round cookie cutter or small glass with a diameter of between 1 1/2 in. and 2 in. 4.) Bake cookies on an ungreased cookie sheet for 10 minutes. Cool on wire rack. Meanwhile, prepare the peppermint chocolate coating. Slowly melt chocolate, using short bursts of heat in the microwave, or by using/simulating a double boiler. Stir in peppermint oil. 5.) Using a fork, gently lower cookies one at a time into the coating. Turn to coat entirely, then lift out with fork, allowing extra chocolate to drip off before placing cookie on a parchment or plastic-lined cookie sheet. Refrigerate chocolate-coated cookies for 15-30 minutes to allow them to set. Recipe adapted from The View From Great Island There you have it! Your own homemade Thin Mints. Time to throw out the store-bought "Mint Thins" and scarf down a couple of these bad boys.
OMG Samoa Brownies – Girl Scout Cookies Gone Wild
Somebody pinch me. Am I dead? I must be dead. Because I am IN HEAVEN. These Samoa Brownies, brought to you by Broma Bakery, are all I've ever needed in a dessert: gooey chocolate brownie, toasted coconut, and sweet caramel. I thought Samoa girl scout cookies were as good as it gets – and then I met these brownies. Samoas Brownies Recipe by Sarah Fennel at Broma Bakery Ingredients For the brownies: ¾ cup cocoa powder 1½ cups sugar 2 eggs 12 tablespoons unsalted butter ½ cup all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons vanilla extract ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup bittersweet chocolate disks 1 teaspoon brewed coffee (optional) For the coconut caramel: 1 cup granulated sugar 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temp, cut into tablespoons ½ cup heavy cream, room temp 2½ cups sweetened, shredded coconut For the chocolate drizzle: ¼ cup chopped bittersweet chocolate 1. Brownies: Preheat oven to 350°F. Line an 8"x8" baking dish with parchment paper and set aside. In a microwave-safe mixing bowl, melt the butter. Stir in sugar, eggs, vanilla extract, salt, and optional coffee. Once combined, fold in cocoa powder and flour. Toss in bittersweet chocolate disks. Pour the brownie batter into the baking dish, spreading evenly to the edges. Bake for 35 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center of the brownies comes out clean. Remove from oven and allow to cool for 15 minutes before topping with caramel sauce. 2. Coconut Caramel Sauce: While the brownies are baking, make your coconut caramel. In a medium saucepan, heat the sugar on medium-high heat for about 5 minutes. Use a spatula to occasionally stir the sugar, getting to the bottom of the pan. At first the sugar will be lumpy, but will soon melt and start turning a brownish color. Don't stir too often, just enough to keep everything evenly cooking. After 5 minutes, the sugar should become fully melted. Once it becomes a dark amber hue, remove from heat immediately and stir in butter. The mixture will violently bubble. You're doing it right. Use your spatula to stir the butter and sugar until they melt together completely. This can take 1-2 minutes. Next, pour in the heavy cream and sea salt. You can use 1 to 1½ teaspoons, depending on how much saltiness you like. Use your spatula to stir until everything is combined. Place back on the stove for about 30 seconds, stirring the whole time. Remove from heat. Stir in coconut flakes. Set aside until brownies are cooled. 3.) Assemble the Brownies: Once the brownies have cooled for 15 minutes, run a knife along the edges so they don't stick to the pan. Spread the coconut caramel on top of the brownies. Again, run a knife along the edges to prevent anything from sticking to the pan. Heat the drizzling chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl in 30 second increments. Stir in between each heating. Spoon melted chocolate into a small ziplock bag, creating a makeshift pastry bag. Cut a small (tiny!) slit at the bottom corner of the bag. Drizzle the melted chocolate over the coconut caramel. Set in the fridge to cool for about 1 hour. Cut into 9 brownies and serve! If you liked this Girl Scout cookie remix recipe, try making your own Homemade Thin Mints!
6 Korean Olympians To Watch!
You know I can't WAIT for the Olympics so let's look at a few awesome Olympians representing South Korea :D PS: 올림픽 - oh-lim-pik! Ki Bo Bae - Archery A South Korean archer who was ranked the world’s number one archer in August 2015. She is the current World Championship and the defending Olympic champion in archery. An Chang Rim - Judo South Korea’s premier lightweight Judo champion and the nation’s representative in the 2016 summer olympics. He is currently ranked first in the world and seeded first in the Olympics. Kim Ji Yeon - Fencing A South Korean sabre fencer and the 2012 Olympic champion. Having started foil fencing at the age of 13, she is the first South Korean woman to win a gold medal in fencing in the Olympic games. Shin A Lam - Fencing A fencer whose 2012 duel sparked a huge controversy in the Olympic games after a timekeeping error gave her opponent a timing advantage. When South Korea immediately appealed the decision, Shin waited for over an hour on the duelling ground, in accordance to the fencing bylaws, while judges deliberated and eventually gave the win to Shin’s opponent. Son Yeon Jae - Rhythmic Gymnastics An individual rhythmic gymnast, dubbed the “National Fairy” of South Korea. She has won titles in the 2014 Asian Games, 2010 Asian Games, and 2014 World Championships. Calling it now: she's going to be the next Kim Yuna and have her face on EVERY advertisement lol! Park Tae Hwan - Swimming An Olympic swimmer who is the first South Korean to win an Olympic medal in swimming. He has competed and won medals in the 2008 and 2012 Summer Olympics, and is to compete once more in the upcoming 2016 games. Who else is PUUUUUMPED for the Olympics?!
Kpop is Actually Born from Korean Protest Songs
Alright so I'm a total history nerd, I majored in East Asian Studies and eat stuff like this up. Read the full (long!) article here - I will try to explain it basically, but its really worth the read. Here we go: It all started with Japan. As you might know, Japan colonized Korea eventually trying to erase Korean culture all together on the peninsula. In the very beginning though, that wasn't the case. Japan was willing to share Korean and Japanese culture, and the Japanese and Korean elite often spoke together and traded pop culture. Japanese elite brought over Western-influenced music because of their connections with the Western world (which Korea didn't interact with other than missionaries at the time) The Korean elite wanted to be modern and successful like Japan, so they adopted this music (called Changga) as their new favorite genre. (You can hear a lot of European influences in early Korean music...) This is where it gets interesting. The Korean elite wanted to be independent of Japan. They wanted Korea to stand alone as a strong nation, not pushed around by China or Japan anymore. They stared the pro-independence movement. Now, most revolutions like this would turn to traditional music, traditional culture to strengthen the country (for example, Korea would use ancient Korean songs to protest the Japanese occupation) but the Korean elite didn't! They wanted Korea to be strong, and to be strong they felt like they needed to modernize - ie be like the West. They used this Changga music (ironically brought to them by Japan) to protest Japanese rule! To this day Korea is always trying to "keep up with" the Western world so that they can be considered modern and powerful. Most things that they do is to modernize and stay trendy because that is how the country has always defined strength. But then, Japan decided to make money off of that... Japan had seen its first real pop music hit in 1914. People were buying records, following tabloids, and really getting into pop culture. That was really the birth of the Japanese music industry. In 1926, Korea had a similar experience. A song called the "Death Song" appeared, sung by Yun Shim-Deok. The singer committed suicide with her lover right after the song was released and the story made HUGE headlines. It was chilling, 'romantic,' and dramatic. Korea ate it up. Japanese record companies came in and started selling the record, selling over 50,000 copies! (In 1926 that number is totally insane!) You can listen to the death song here: The record industry after that was run mainly by the Japanese yakuza and their partnered Korean gangsters. The industry was set up very similar to how it is now, with entertainment industries doing everything in-house (SM has specific song writers that only work for SM, and their artists are actors, singers, models, etc) This is also why so many Kpop artists become actors...because even back in the 1920s musicians couldn't make enough money so the real way to make a living was through acting. That still stands today. So, today's Kpop is based off of this first "Korean pop" hit (the death song) AND protest songs against Japan. So when people say that Kpop is just a copy of Western music, they're sort of right but not in the way that they're thinking. Yes, its a reflection of Western culture, but the reason behind it is that Korea has been fighting to be recognized as a modern, powerful force to be reckoned with since the early 1900s. They want people to know Korea is strong, modern, and a country to look up to, not look down upon. So the next time someone tells you Kpop is a lame copy of American pop - give them this little history lesson. Again, PLEASE read the full article - its so interesting! HERE it is!