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If Every 2016 Presidential Candidate Were A Disney Villain

College Humor recently released this hilarious illustrated list of the top candidates in the 2016 Presidential race. Illustrator Nathan Yaffe took Disney's favorite villains and transformed them into the candidates we just can't seem to get away from. I mean, after all, one of these people are going to be running our country in the next year. The descriptions are as keen as the pictures and it's ever so fitting. Scroll below and see if the character matches the candidate. REAL quotes from the candidates have been thrown in as well :

"If I want to knock a story off the front page, I just change my hairstyle."

"I would do 'probably nothing' for African Americans."

"My own personal theory is that Joseph built the pyramids to store grain. Now all the archeologists think that they were made for the pharaohs' graves. But, you know, it would have to be something awfully big if you stop and think about it."

"And the ultimate thing is, I may not be the expert that some people are on foreign policy, but I did stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night."

"I don't know, I didn't get a call from Bill Clinton before I entered the race."

"Nobody who works 40 hours a week should be living in poverty."

"I do not believe there is a U.S. Constitutional right to same sex marriage."

"I mean, part of the beauty of me is that I am very rich."

"Man up and say I'm fat."

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Haha!! That's exactly the way I feel about Ben Carson...
THIS IS BRILLIANT. I love this!!!! So effing funny. Bernie is good, but I think Huckabee was clutch. Perfectly marrying Disney and the real monsters: politicians hahahahah
Hisses voice isssss sssssooo sssssoothing @ButterflyBlu ;)
YES! This is the best thing I've seen in a while. I think Bernie's way probably my fav. I was like picturing his voice in that character and it's perfect.
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