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Healthing

So I'm trying to be more healthy and get in shape and what not. I'm a pretty big fan of these protein shakes cause you can add whatever you want to them and they taste pretty good! You can even throw some Greek yogurt in it. I made mine with 1 cup ice 2 scoops protein powder 1 cup milk (any milk works) 2.5 oz mango spears 2 oz blueberries
I also use MyFitnessPal app. It's a great way to track your calories and nutrients! They have a subscription version (it's like $10 a month) if you want to track macro nutrients and other things in more detail, buut I personally stick with the free version.
And if you hate going to the gym like me, you can always work out at home! I prefer yoga (ignore the pink hair dye) and found this little DVD at Wal-Mart for around $10.
Now keep in mind I'm no professional at this stuff. I'm not rocking a six pack and I can do a total of 5 push ups... Maybe 10 if I'm lucky lol. Just wanted to share some ideas I guess. If you have any suggestions or anything drop a comment below!
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@mchlyang No I just buy the stuff lol
Are you a brand ambassador for Herbal Life as well?
@alywoah Making your own always tastes better. Just toss in some fresh fruit and that's what it tastes like!
Awesomeee. It's been such a long time since I've had protein shakes. I mostly hated the taste. But the way you make it sounds really good!
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