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Jesus: Prophet of Peace and Love or Purveyor of Fear and Hate?
Multitudes of Christian commentators over the past two millennia have proclaimed the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth to be unsurpassed tenets of spiritual wisdom and unexcelled guidelines for living a morally responsible life.  Hundreds of millions of devout believers are absolutely convinced that they will conquer death and attain everlasting life because God sacrificed his son for their sins. They are also convinced that Jesus didn’t really die. He was restored to life and subsequently ascended to heaven to spend eternity with his father, and soon Jesus will return to Earth to judge the wicked and rapture righteous believers up to heaven with him. Countless books have been written extolling the allegedly commendable features of the “Christian worldview” and the “Christ-centered life,” but, by contrast, few authors have examined the unsavory side of Jesus’ personality and his less than-meritorious behavior and opinions. For this presentation, I’ve formulated, in a balanced fashion, two sets of ten principles based on Jesus’ pronouncements. Although his directives come from the canonical gospels (the books of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John), additional documentation is abundant elsewhere in the New Testament epistles and letters. The twenty precepts are listed along with the supporting Bible verses from which they derive. The cited verses and passages appear in this separate article. This scriptural evidence will enable readers to answer for themselves the binary question that is the title of this article. NB: This article is not made assuming Jesus literally indeed existed, but an evaluation of the character of the Abrahamic religious texts. Read the full article:https://www.fadewblogs.eu.org/2021/11/jesus-prophet-of-love-or-hate.html
5 Inspirational Words From Couples Who Decided To Wait
Yes, it's possible. Waiting until marriage that is. To engage in sexually activity. You didn't think so? Well, today is the day you will be proven wrong. Although the idea is foreign to many, according to a thread on Reddit it's more common than you think. With a whopping 1,800 comments, it seems as if waiting until marriage as become the 'it' thing to do. We must keep in mind that it's not a trend, it's a personal decision that should be made between two people. If you've ever considered waiting until marriage or have made a vow to do so, keep scrolling and check out the inspiring stories told by those who have made the courageous decision to simply wait. "Next year will be our 21st anniversary. No complaints at all. Love my wife and have 3 wonderful kids. I would not have done it any other way, was just how I was brought up." —wildhermit "Our relationship is pretty amazing. Even though we saved it for marriage, we were both plenty educated on the mechanics of everything, and neither of us had any weird hang-ups or fears about it. From my perspective, sex is a really personal, spiritual thing and I'm so glad that we've only shared that part of ourselves with each other." —mtdna_array "It's great. I was 29 when we got married. Never regretted waiting for a second." —GreatTragedy "My friend and his wife waited until their marriage to get down. They planned on waiting a few years to have kids. A month later the pregnancy announcement hit Facebook. When I asked him what happened he said, 'My pull out game is not strong.'" —CoolRunner "Things are great in our marriage. We were both virgins when we got married and we have enjoyed our sexual relationship a lot over the last 11 years. More than just the waiting, our ability to respect each other, work together toward common goals, and communicate clearly and kindly has helped us." —HomeFires If you could do it all over again, would you wait? Do you regret your decision of not waiting if you didn't? @marshalledgar @alywoah @TessStevens @keith2web @YourConscience @EasternShell @sophiamor @Arellano1052 @jazziejazz @primodiva93 @buddyesd @danidee @shannonl5 @InVinsybll @MyAffairWith @nicolejb @TurtleyTurtles
I Said No to a Religious Friend as She Lay Dying. Was I Right?
Religion is nothing but a crock used by people to fortify themselves against the frightening prospect of death, that chillingly inevitable end of life.  And when death impends, be that at war, in hospital, or on death row, people cling more desperately to that delusion.  Even nonbelievers walk on eggshells when faced with a dying person. We wonder: Is this really a good time to tread on their sensibilities and disabuse them of their crock? Not long ago I found myself in that quandary.  Someone I knew was dying, and I went to her deathbed to pay my respects. She was a woman who respected me as an elder of the Nigerian community in Cleveland.  She was also something of a protégé, having sought my advice repeatedly as she considered the proper advanced-degree path to pursue.  In my days as a scientific educator—when, also, two of my sons were in the university—I had become something of an information resource for my fellow Nigerians on matters like the choice of college to attend and the discipline of study, and especially how to tap into financial assistance programs available to good students and their parents in the U.S.  I chose to visit her when most of her friends and well-wishers would be at work. I was wary of the perplexed reactions of my fellow Nigerians when it became known that I am an atheist.  My friends told me I would come across much better as an agnostic or a pagan than an out-and-out atheist, for Nigerians are often ranked alongside Americans in sheer religiosity—of the pushy and loud sort.  It’s amazing that the very people whom religion has historically oppressed and denigrated the most (i.e. women, Blacks, colonized people) are the ones who cling to it most tenaciously!  The Nigerian media go so far as to estimate that one in three houses in the cities and townships of the Christian south of the country are used nowadays as churches, chapels, temples, tabernacles, or other places of worship.  “Nigerian atheist” is considered an oxymoron. Those who know I was raised a Catholic—and, to boot, an altar boy able to recite the entire Eucharist liturgy in Latin and English—profess themselves baffled by my apostasy.  Read the full article: https://www.fadewblogs.eu.org/2021/11/I-said-no.html
“I Lost Fear of Losing What I Never Wanted to Lose Forever” by Lumina H.
“I Lost Fear of Losing What I Never Wanted to Lose Forever” by Lumina H. Once upon a time, in my worst nightmare I screamed in the middle of the night “Don’t Leave Me!” Fear of being abandoned Fear of being rejected Fear of being replaced Horror strikes like lightning Blitz, Blitz, Blitz Every thunder of anxiety electrocuted me I’ve been punched, kicked and screamed at I know all too well how it feels to be treated like dirt I’ve been to hell and back, both inside and outside my head. So what I feared most in this world Was you, of you turning your back on me Never to return, ever. Fear brought anxiety, pain, worry, stress, anger, fury, insomnia and finally tears Buckets, trucks, pools of tears Gradually my tears filled up a swimming pool And in my swimming pool of tears I drowned myself And I needed a CPR But no one came… The water was still trapped in my lungs And I forgot how to breath, how to live I was dying I had seconds to live Could I live again? Could anyone give me new life? Could anyone revive me? Somebody… Anybody… Please help me… In my desperate need, I pleaded, prayed and hoped And then, right then Someone did come to my rescue But He wasn’t you He was unexpected While you left me drowning He came with a thousand letters of love and care I didn’t know Him He was a stranger to me But to him, I was no stranger He had been waiting for me all along He watched me dive into the ocean of tears He watched me as I sunk deeper into the sea of sorrow He always wanted to help me, to save me He never wanted me to drown myself, never He wanted me to live To live without Fear. To live without Fear of abandonment To live without Fear of rejection To live without Fear of replacement To live bravely, fearlessly, hopefully, gratefully To live honestly, courageously, earnestly, kindly To live with everything I had replaced with fear He breathed new air into my lungs Water came spluttering out of my throat My heart started beating again I could feel the blood rushing faster in my veins I’m alive! I’m alive! I’m alive! I’ve been Saved! Saved! Saved! My new savior will show me ways not to be afraid of losing you I’ve already lost you once And from now he will show me never to fear Losing you again and again Because in the far future Fast forward to many years later Here I am The future me said “I lost fear of losing what I never wanted to lose forever” “I lost fear of losing you, who I never wanted to lose, never” So today I wait, I hope, I run, I believe, I trust Towards that future of losing fear of losing you.
Hoodoo Rootwork
What is hoodoo rootwork? Also called "hoodoo" or "conjure work", rootwork is the spiritual work that began with the ancestors of Africa. During the transatlantic slave trade, Africans were transported on ships bound for the United States, separated from their homeland, and forced to reconcile their traditions with others. ROOTWORK: The Power of Folk Magic 17 Hoodoo began to blend in with Native American culture and magic. White Americans tried to convert Africans and African Americans to Christianity. His descendants, who followed Hoodoo, hid their traditions in secret, harmonizing Hoodoo with certain aspects of Christianity, without finding ways to hide their culture. In essence, hoodoo is a folk spell, driven by the blood and tears of African ancestors. In the tradition of rootwork, condensed oil is also known as "wiping oil", "conditioned oil" and "hoodoo oil". The oil consists of a blend of different ingredients, including flowers, herbs, high quality essential oils, roots, minerals, and carrier oils to form a powerful, purposeful infused formula. Amulets, charms, amulets, and personal matters are sometimes included for the purpose of oil. What do root workers believe? The bone / rootwork emphasizes the power of natural curiosity and the practitioner praying to the gods. It allows the hood to exist outside of a particular spiritual or religious belief system. While the root workers will pray to the Psalms and the Lord during their magic work, they see it as a way to help God in their work. Work can still be done whether the person prays this particular psalm or not. Rootwork is firmly rooted in a very practical approach to magic. Getting results is the most important thing, and most types of mantras are based on very common everyday needs such as: withdrawing money, making love, protecting or dealing with hurtful people. There is scope for both blessing and cursing in Hudoo, for healing and curing disease, and for receiving blessings as well as sending curses. Although it is common in other magical systems to hear such phrases as karma and "no harm", there are no such moral laws within the hoodo. The God of the Old Testament is a God of protection and there is nothing wrong with calling on Him. Justice for hurting your enemies. It is my personal belief that this leads to the growing popularity of other traditions of rootwork with modern magicians. Some magicians choose not to engage in the work of any harmful enemy. These route workers usually call themselves "Lady Hearted". It is important to note that this is not an insulting term. It's just a way to tell them clearly where they draw their personal moral lines. A Beginner guide to rootwork oils Oil plays a key role in rituals. In early religious and spiritual traditions, the oil was used for baptism, anointing the body, healing diseases, beginning in tradition or religion, and during marriage and other rituals. In the tradition of rootwork, we continue to use oil for these purposes today. They also help give us more power to achieve our goals. Every essential oil has a unique fragrance that stimulates all the emotions we are feeling and our desires. For example, if you want to express peace in your life, consider using chamomile or lavender oil to create a sense of peace in your life. Conjuring oil requires time and commitment. Plan and choose your ingredients wisely. Consider the shelf life of oil, and remember your intentions and how you will use the oil. As mentioned earlier, pray for your ingredients and ingredients, and bless your purpose before and after preparing your conjugated oil. Once you have finished making the oil, keep them in a cool, dark place for at least 3 weeks. Or, you can put them on a window with a lot of sunlight so that the herbs can soak in the oil for at least 3 weeks. The oil lasts for several months until water enters the oil. When it comes in contact with water, it becomes unclean and becomes moldy.