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American Foods That Canada Does Actually Better!!
I lived in Canada and in the U.S - No offense - but I feel like Canadian foods are better at some point :) I still miss Timhortons so bad!!! Coffee tasted great, Timbits and Iced Caps were just great in everyway. (1) Fries with Poutine Canadians take plain french fries to a whole new level by adding cheese and gravy to them. I used to eat this almost everyday in the back old days~ (2) Beer Okay, beer may be a drink, but it is definitely something Canadians do better than Americans. In Canada, the average “normal” beer has a higher alcohol contentthan American beer, with a range of 4.0 percent to 6.1 percent alcohol by volume (ABV) as compared to America’s 4.1 percent to 5.9 percent ABV. (Oh come on it's better than Coors for sure) (3) Chips Forget salt and vinegar, barbecue, and sour cream and onion potato chips. Canada has thebest flavorsthat you cannot buy in the US. Try Lay’s Ketchup chips, Ruffles All Dressed chips, Lays Dill Pickle chips and Hickory Sticks. And yes, we even havepoutine-flavored chips. I still miss the ketchup one <3 (4) Coffee I know America runs on Dunkin’, but that’s only because you guys do not have Tim Hortons (in most states). Tim Hortons’ coffee isfar superiorto that of Dunkin’ Donuts and if you haven’t heard of a “double double,” you sure are missing out. Try Ice Caps - I remember it was under $2 and tasted so much better than Starbucks coffee frap (which is like $3-4). (5) Milk You might be confused by this one. How can milk be better in Canada? Two words:bagged milk. Stop that face you’re making right now and understand just how amazing bagged milk is. Not only does ittaste better out of a bag, but it also is much more fun to pour, not to mention cheaper. It's cheap and tasty. You can use the milk one at a time - put the bagged milk in the plastic jar and once it's done, just thow away the garbage~ VOILA!! Click LIKE <3 if you agree!!!!
Perfect Pan-Seared Steak
The basics to any perfect steak dish is a good quality, high-grade cut of beef. Ingredients: 1 bone-in or boneless rib eye steak or sirloin steak at least 1 ½ pounds, cut to at least 1 ½ inches thick Pinch of salt Freshly ground black pepper 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons butter 2 peeled garlic cloves, left whole Few sprigs fresh parsley, including stems Optional: Wine and stock (chicken, beef, veal,etc.) and butter for deglazing the pan and making a delicious pan sauce Directions: 1. Salt and pepper one side of the steak. 2. Heat your seasoned cast iron skillet to smoking hot. Add oil and swirl around to coat. Add steak seasoned-side down (place it in pan away from you so you don’t get splattered), and then salt and pepper the other side of the steak. At this point do not touch it for two minutes. Using tongs (never pierce the meat with a fork), flip the steak and add butter, garlic and parsley to the pan next to the steak. Allow the steak to cook for 2 more minutes. 3. Right after you flip the steak for the first time, with a spoon or small ladle, keep basting the melted butter over the steak. Baste continually for the full two minutes (tilt pan a little if you have to, to get the butter onto the spoon). 4. After two minutes on each side, keep flipping and basting the steak each time leaving the steak for 30 seconds before turning. Test the steak with the poke test (see note below) and remove at medium rare at about the five to six minute mark of total cooking time. Cook a minute or two longer for medium to well. A thicker steak (such as a sirloin) may take longer. 5. Turn off the heat and baste one more time. Leave the steak in the pan loosely covered with foil for 10 minutes and allow to rest before cutting. Baste one more time, and remove to a cutting board. Either cut the steak in half for each serving or for a nicer presentation, slice on the bias and serve slices. 6. Discard the pan drippings or if desired, deglaze the pan with a little wine, then and stock and simmer for a few minutes to reduce the drippings. Add a tablespoon or two of butter to thicken for a nice pan sauce .
Meatloaf Cupcakes
According to this meatloaf cupcake recipe, cupcakes don't have to be sweet. And I'm totally sold. Plus, everything is much better in miniature form and this includes meatloaf. If I have enough mashed potato leftover I will use this recipe. Makes 12 servings. For the meatloaf: 1 pound ground beef 1 pound ground pork 1 small onion, grated 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon black pepper 1 cup panko crumbs 2-3 splashes Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley 1/4 cup milk 2 eggs, lightly beaten For the sauce: 1/2 cup chili sauce 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar 1 teaspoon dry mustard For the potato “icing”: 3 cups boiled potatoes, chopped into chunks 1 egg yolk 1/4 cup half and half or heavy cream Pinch of salt 2 tablespoons melted butter Instructions: Preheat your oven to 350 F. Prepare the meatloaf by combining all ingredients together in a large bowl. Mix until incorporated. Don’t over handle the mixture or the meatloaf may be too dense. Chill while you prepare the sauce and potatoes. Make the sauce by whisking the chili sauce, brown sugar and mustard together until smooth. Set aside. While the meat is baking, whip the boiled potatoes together with the egg yolk, half and half or cream and salt until smooth. Stir in the melted butter. Fit a pastry bag with a large star tip and fill with the potato mixture. Set aside, but do not refrigerate. To assemble the cupcakes, lightly spray a cupcake tin with nonstick cooking spray. Fill each indentation with a small handful of the meat mixture, gently pressing it down until it is completely filled. Spread a teaspoon of the sauce around the top of each cupcake, and bake for about 30 minutes, until the meat is cooked through. Remove from the oven and turn on the broiler. Pipe some potato “icing” on top of each cupcake. Put the cupcakes under the broiler for a few minutes until the potatoes are lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Remove from the oven and enjoy.
How to reduce your food waste in 7 days (and save money!)
Day 1 Store your ingredients in the proper place to extend the shelf life and preserve quality. Keep root vegetables and onions in a cool, dark place. Leafy green vegetables, apples and grapes in the fridge between 1c-4c. Bread will become dry if stored in the fridge, however, if you plan on using it just for toast, it will certainly extend its life. Opened jars are best kept in the fridge. Day 2 Before you start cooking, consider the amount of ingredients you really need to use. An average portion size for uncooked rice is between 80-90g per person, and 80-100g dried pasta per person. Cooking a larger amount than needed of these basic ingredients can be costly and wasteful. If you intentionally cook more than needed so you can save some for another time, make sure you plan when you are going to use it- and stick to it! Day 3 Treat "best before" dates on food labelling as guidelines and not rules. Imagine that your food doesn’t have packaging or a use-by date. Use your senses to determine if it is edible and of course, use your common sense. If a vegetable appears a little limp, it can be chopped up and used in a cooked dish, but if there is visible mould or an odour, it shouldn’t be eaten for the purpose of food safety. Day 4 Have a selection of food storage containers and labels on hand for storing leftovers. This will maximise the space in your fridge / freezer and allow you to recognise what is in each container. Keep leftovers of sauces in glass jars in the fridge, again to make it easy to recognise and locate, and keep them fresher for longer.  Day 5 Rotate the items around in your fridge, freezer and cupboards to ensure that everything gets used before it passes its best quality and taste. This also reminds you of what you have available before you go shopping, so you can create meals around these products.  Day 6 Make an informal list of the food you throw away, so you can recognise any patterns. Throwing away half a loaf of bread? Think about how better to store it and use it up. Throwing away that leftover pasta sauce you made last week? Remember to add leftovers to your meal plan. Throwing away an unopened bag of spinach? Base your shopping list around what you’re actually going to cook that week. Day 7 Get creative with your leftover ingredients and cooked foods. Reducing waste and saving money on food bills doesn’t have to be a struggle, there is a world of new recipes and meals available when you think outside of the box - just have fun with it. 
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