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Washington Town Being Overrun By Rabbits?
Yes, we all love rabbits, but who knew what trouble they could get into when there's enough of them in one place? This is the plight of Langley, Washington, a town on the coast of Whidbey Island that has recently come across quite the overpopulation problem. The problem has especially hit the local school budget pretty hard, as rabbits burrowed so many holes into a middle school football field that it has been rendered unusable. According to Brian Miller, facilities director of the South Whidbey School District: "There is feces everywhere, and there are some illnesses that can be carried and transmitted. Every day there are new holes, and the ones we've filled in are dug out, again." Langley has always been known to have a particularly high population of wild rabbits. In fact, it is perhaps one of their largest tourism drawing points. However, it has recently gotten to a point where the overpopulation is causing tremendous damage. Residents have complained of the rabbits digging up their gardens, pooping virtually everywhere there's grass, and creating nests all over their properties. One resident even said he had over one hundred wild rabbits born on his property in the span of a year. (A self-service rabbit maternity ward, Langley. You has it.) Mayor Fred McCarthy has heard his residents, and while he doesn't believe in eradicating the population entirely, he does think lessening the amount is an obviously good plan. "I don't think we're going to get into the business of trapping and euthanizing rabbits. I don't think that would go over well in Langley. I'm not into killing animals for no reason." Some solutions the city has considered is hiring a falconer to help increase the amount of the rabbit's natural predators in the community. They are also considering relocating some. The school district is also working to raise $60,000 for a protective fence. So now I want to know: How would you fix Langley's overpopulation problem? Should residents be able to shoot or trap rabbits on their property, or do you like the idea of using hawks to create a balance?
Pinus wallichiana - Himalayan white pine, Bhutan pine, Blue pine, Himalayan pine, Kail (Hindi, Kashmiri), Tongshi (Bhutanese), Qiao Song (Chinese)
Conservation Status Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern Widespread and common, not threatened and hence listed as Least Concern. Pinus wallichiana grows in the Himalayas in the valleys and foothills, to a maximum altitude of 2,700 m, but in Bhutan it reaches 3,400 m a.s.l. Sometimes it forms pure stands or forests, in other places it appears as an important forest component mixed with broad-leaved trees, e.g. species of the genera Quercus, Acer and Ilex. In the western Himalayas, where conditions are drier, Pinus wallichiana forms mixed forests with Cedrus deodara. Other conifers with which it may be associated are Pinus roxburghii, Abies spectabilis, or Abies densa and Tsuga dumosa in the wetter eastern part of its range. Potentially, over-exploitation could negatively impact the population, but the species is too common and wide-spread for this to have serious consequences other than locally. Himalayan white pine or Bhutan pine is an important timber tree in many parts of the Himalaya. It is of similar timber properties and quality to Pinus strobus and Pinus monticola in North America, with tall, straight trees producing straight grained wood of good strength. It is used for construction, carpentry and joinery, wall panelling, veneers, furniture, fences and gates, crates and boxes, and railway sleepers after treatment with preservatives. In India (Himachal Pradesh) resin tapping is an important use to obtain naval stores. A sweet liquid known as honey dew is secreted by aphids from the leaves and collected by local people of the mountain forests for consumption. Bhutan pine was introduced to England in 1823 and, unlike several other species of Pinus subsection Strobi, it turned out to be relatively immune to infections with blister rust (Cronartium ribicola; Basidiomycota) as well as to atmospheric pollution. In forestry it is also used in plantations and several hybrids with related species have been established with timber production in mind (e.g. the cross between Pinus strobus and Pinus wallichiana = Pinus x schwerinii Fitschen). Bhutan pine is a widely used amenity tree and a number of cultivars have been selected and are in the trade. This species occurs in several protected areas. https://conifersgarden.com/encyclopedia/pinus/pinus-wallichiana
Chia sẻ kinh nghiệm làm đẹp da (p2)
Chào cả nhà, em đã dùng sữa ong chúa được hơn 1 năm và giờ đây em cảm nhận được hiệu quả của sữa ong chúa mang lại. Bằng chứng là trước đây khi chưa dùng sữa ong chúa thì da em bị mụn cám và mụn trứng cá, có cả mụn bọc nữa, da em thuộc da dầu và lỗ chân lông to, nên khi dù dùng các loại kem hay thuốc trị mụn gì cũng không hết. Vì những vấn đề này xuất phát từ nội tiết tố trong cơ thể bị rối loạn, không cân bằng được. Em tìm đủ mọi phương pháp, uống tây, nam gì cũng không giảm được nhiều. Nhưng khi em biết đến sản phẩm sữa ong chúa tươi từ một người bạn, lúc đầu nghe nói e cũng không tin lắm, nhưng cũng tìm hiểu chỗ bán uy tín và đặt về dùng thử xem có hiệu quả không?. Sau khi em sử dụng được một thời gian, có khi em sẽ đắp mặt nạ sữa ong chúa tươi, có khi em sẽ trộn sữa ong chúa với các nguyên liệu tự nhiên khác, ví dụ như mật ong, tinh bột nghệ, bột yến mạch, hay bột trà xanh, nha đam,… mỗi tuần em chỉ đắp mặt nạ sữa ong chúa từ 2 - 3 lần vì da mặt em là da nhạy cảm nên không dám đắp nhiều. Cứ thế em đã kiên trì được một thời gian thì da mặt mình có sự thay đổi rõ ràng, khi soi gương mình không còn thấy mụn nổi nữa mà lỗ chân lông cũng đã nhỏ hơn trước, lượng dầu cũng giảm hẳn. Sáng ngủ dậy, rửa mặt thấy da mình trông trắng hồng và mịn màng nhìn thấy thích lắm. Bây gờ, chỉ cần một chút son là có thế ra đường đi cà phê với bạn bè rồi.
Ait Ben Haddou Kasbah
The ksar, a group of earthen buildings surrounded by high walls, is a traditional pre-Saharan habitat. The houses crowd together within the defensive walls, which are reinforced by corner towers. Ait-Ben-Haddou, in Ouarzazate province, is a striking example of the architecture of southern Morocco. Located in the foothills on the southern slopes of the High Atlas in the Province of Ouarzazate, the site of Ait-Ben-Haddou is the most famous ksar in the Ounila Valley. The Ksar of Aït-Ben-Haddou is a striking example of southern Moroccan architecture. The ksar is a mainly collective grouping of dwellings. Inside the defensive walls which are reinforced by angle towers and pierced with a baffle gate, houses crowd together - some modest, others resembling small urban castles with their high angle towers and upper sections decorated with motifs in clay brick - but there are also buildings and community areas. It is an extraordinary ensemble of buildings offering a complete panorama of pre-Saharan earthen construction techniques. The oldest constructions do not appear to be earlier than the 17th century, although their structure and technique were propagated from a very early period in the valleys of southern Morocco. The site was also one of the many trading posts on the commercial route linking ancient Sudan to Marrakesh by the Dra Valley and the Tizi-n'Telouet Pass. Architecturally, the living quarters form a compact grouping, closed and suspended. The community areas of the ksar include a mosque, a public square, grain threshing areas outside the ramparts, a fortification and a loft at the top of the village, an caravanserai, two cemeteries (Muslim and Jewish) and the Sanctuary of the Saint Sidi Ali or Amer. The Ksar of Ait- Ben-Haddou is a perfect synthesis of earthen architecture of the pre-Saharan regions of Morocco. Criterion (iv): The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou is an eminent example of a ksar in southern Morocco illustrating the main types of earthen constructions that may be observed dating from the 17th century in the valleys of Dra, Todgha, Dadès and Souss. Criterion (v): The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou illustrates the traditional earthen habitat, representing the culture of southern Morocco, which has become vulnerable as a result of irreversible socio-economic and cultural changes Integrity (2009) All the structures comprising the ksar are located within the boundaries of the property and the buffer zone protects its environment. The earthen buildings are very vulnerable due to lack of maintenance and regular repair resulting from the abandonment of the ksar by its inhabitants. The CERKAS (Centre for the conservation and rehabilitation of the architectural heritage of atlas and sub-atlas zones) monitors, with difficulty, respect for the visual integrity of the property. Authenticity (2009) In comparison to other ksour of the region, the Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou has preserved its architectural authenticity with regard to configuration and materials. The architectural style is well preserved and the earthen constructions are perfectly adapted to the climatic conditions and are in harmony with the natural and social environment. The large houses in the lower part of the village, with well conserved decorative motifs, are regularly maintained. The construction materials used still remain earth and wood. The inclination to introduce cement has so far been unsuccessful, thanks to the continued monitoring of the «Comité de contrôle des infractions» (Rural Community, Town Planning Division, Urban Agency, CERKAS). Only a few lintels and reinforced concrete escaped its vigilance, but they have been hidden by earthen rendering. Particular attention is also paid to doors and windows giving on to the lanes, to ensure that the wood is not replaced by metal. Protection and management requirements (2009) Protection measures essentially relate to the different laws for the listing of historic monuments and sites, in particular the Law 22-80 concerning Moroccan heritage. The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou currently has a five-year management plan (2007-2012). This management plan is the result of two years of reflection and workshops involving all the persons and institutions concerned with the future of the site, in particular the local populations. The recommendations of this plan are being implemented. Furthermore, two management committees have been established (a local committee and a national one) in which all the parties are represented and cooperate in decision-making. As well as managing the property, CERKAS ensures coordination in the implementation of this management plan. visit our site for more informations...
17 stylish plants for hanging pots
Plants in hanging pots are an excellent way to add greenery to your indoor space for the living room. Both the container and the plant add colours to your living room. Planters require zero landscaping, and they are effortless to care for. If you live on rent, then plants for hanging pots are very much suitable for you. These are popular indoor and outdoor hanging plants you can change as per your need. Verbena Verbena provides stress-relieving essential oil. This plant is available in different varieties. It requires a lot of suns and well-draining soil. Verbena is an attractive butterfly plant. Oxalis Triangularis Oxalis Triangularis Is a colourful hanging plant and also known as the purple Shamrock. This plant can be grown indoors or outdoors. This plant is toxic to pets, so be careful when you place it. The leaves of this plant open up during the day and close at night. Blue bacopa This flowering plant needs consistent moisture; that is why they are grown in containers. Place your blue bacopa where it can get a lot of afternoon shade for good growth. strawberry This is easy to grow the hanging plant. The strawberry flowers have a pleasant fragrance and look pretty like roses, and you will also get the benefit of the fruit. Lobelia Lobelia is available in intense blue colours, and it is a rare colour for flowers. This plant can grow in cooler climates and the shade too. Boston fern Boston fern requires constantly moist soil. This is a typical tropical house plant. This plant can prosper outside if you live in a building climate. Begonia boliviensis Begonia boliviensis has a unique angel wing-shaped leaf that makes it look alluring. One plant can fill a whole Hanging pot in the sun or shade. This plant is hummingbird friendly. Ivy Geranium This plant prefers full hot and Sunny areas. Ivy Geranium is very popular in European countries, and this is a low maintenance plant. Hanging Fuchsia Fuchsias are not suitable for hot climates. But they are a good choice for hanging plants for summer and also attract hummingbirds. They bloom wonderfully in cool areas. Scaevola aemula 'blue wonder.' This plant is known as a fan flower because of its blue fan-shaped flowers. This plant can tolerate drought and looks beautiful in a hanging basket. It does not require deadheading as it blooms, which is why this is suitable for a lazy gardener. Spider plant This is a yellow and green house plant. Spider plants are most adaptable and easy to grow. This plant needs direct sunlight and also can tolerate partial sunlight. Diascia The ideal situation for the growth of this plant is normal temperature, slightly acidic soil and full or partial sunshade. Diascia is a short-lived perennial. Burro's Tail Its tail-like woven branch looks great from a hanging pot. It is very famous for its stunning look. Nasturtium This is the best low maintenance plant and is available, especially in trailing varieties. It prefers moist soil and full sun or partial shade. Petunia This tender perennial is an ideal plant for hanging pots due to its voluminous flowers. Some varieties of petunia require a bit of pruning and deadheading. Black-eyed Susan vine Black-eyed Susan Vine grows very fast and climbs up on the basket's hanger. It is easy to maintain and produce colourful flowers. Grow these plants along a wall. Sweet alyssum This plant is heat and drought resistant. The plant requires specific layer builder environments; its white blooms and enticing scent attracts butterflies and bees.