cheerfulcallie
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Among Dandelions

making wishes.....
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i wish to be an ant there
I love fields of dandelions. Sooo yellow and pretty.
Dandelions~~ If only i still could see them.. I haven't found any here
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Top 5 Native Water Plants for Your Garden
Water gardens have been famous in both private and public locations since ancient times. Water has always been calming to all of our senses. Water also provides for the life that lives around your pond. With their unique colors and forms, water plants offer a wide variety of sizes, shapes and colors that will make your water garden an incredible oasis. There are so many native water plants that are used all over the world to make the gardens more alive and green. Here, you can read about the five best water plants for your garden or pond that raise the beauty of nature and give oxygen to the environment. Monkey Flower With several different native species you have options when it comes to flower color. Monkey Flower is an upright perennial that attracts Butterflies, Bees and other pollinators.Mimulus on average grow up to 18-24 inches, does well in shady areas. Arrow Arum This perennial plant grows best in bogs and shallow water, reaching heights of 2-3 feet on average. This water garden plant gets its name from its arrow shaped leaves. At one time there were 40 different varieties along with different colored blooms. Also does well in shady areas. Bog Bean They naturally grow in boggy and watery areas and have 3 parted green leaves and white to pinkishstar shaped flowers. Flowers generally late spring to late summer.Menyanthes trifoliate also known as buckbean is a very hardy plant that does well in full sun to part shade Golden Club A common emergent water plant that grows with green erect strapped like leaves that float on top of the water. With a waxy texture the leaves repel water. Orontiumaquaticumflowers are long and cylindrical with tiny yellow flowers. Give it full sun for best flower color. Horsetail Horsetail is one of the oldest surviving plant life forms and one of the most requested pond plants. A very hardy and easy to care for true aquatic plant. Stems can remain green even in cold climates, whether you choose the hymale (full size) or the scirpoides (dwarf) variety plant they will offer a great contrast in your pond. Both do well in sun to part shade. Conclusion So, these are some of the best native aquatic plants that you can put into your pond. Consider the size of the plant, water depth and the amount of sun they require when selecting waterplants for your pond. Now, it's your turn to make your water garden plant more attractive with these beautiful water plants.
A leading auction house: Hindman
A leading auction house: Hindman Hindman is one of the country's driving compelling artwork closeout houses. With an immovable spotlight on customer administration, Hindman offers all-encompassing answers for interface customers in nearby US urban communities to the worldwide craftsmanship market. Hindman works a greater number of salerooms in the United States than some other sales management firm and leads more than 100 sales every year in classes like fine adornments, compelling artwork, current plan, fine books and original copies, furniture, beautifying expressions, couture, Asian masterpieces, specialties of the American west, numismatics, and that's just the beginning. Hindman Auctions will also introduce the Spring Prints and Multiples sell-off on May 5, 2021. The deal includes an expansive determination of works from Old Master through Contemporary Prints, Photography, and Picasso ceramics. The closeout starts with a prominently solid meeting of Pop Art from Robert Indiana, Andy Warhol, and Roy Lichtenstein with other noteworthy works of art by Wayne Thiebaud, Ed Ruscha, and Ellsworth Kelly. The photography meeting incorporates works by Berenice Abbott, Ansel Adams, and Marilyn Minter among others. Leslie Hindman auctions is satisfied to introduce Post War and Contemporary Art, a bartering occurring on May 4, 2021. This deal includes a noteworthy cluster of unique works by Magdalena Abakanowicz, Alexander Calder, Sam Francis, Sadamasa Montonaga, Jim Nutt, Tom Wesselmann, and Joan Mitchell, envisioned here, among others. Untitled, 1989 is a dazzling late-vocation Joan Mitchell painting characteristic of both the craftsman's last venture in France and her supported subject of painting from conveyed scene recollections. With her studio in a real sense in Monet's terraces, the touchy spirits of Impressionism occupy this advanced Abstract Expressionist model, adding a convincing referential applied intricacy. We are satisfied to offer this composition in front of Mitchell's impending far reaching review co-coordinated by The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA). Music assumes an enormous part in the entirety of our lives, and when this JukeBox begins to play, the audience is quickly shipped back to a period before the advanced music age. You feel each fly of the record and hear the tin-sounding speakers, something that is almost difficult to duplicate. Part 3130 in the present deal, A Gentleman's Pursuits, is a 1940s Rock-Ola Model F Juke Box, in Working Condition, with assessments of $3,000-$5,000. The forthcoming American and European Art sale will offer in excess of 130 loads of canvases, figures, and chips away at paper from the nineteenth and twentieth hundreds of years with an eminent choice of Pennsylvania Impressionist scenes, and Modernist and Ashcan works. Of specific note is the assortment of Noel and Kathryn Dickinson Wadsworth which incorporates works by Andrew Wyeth, William Glackens, Everett Shinn, and Andre Derain. The deal will likewise include various twentieth century European works by Henri Le Sidaner, Jean Dufy, and Léonard Tsuguharu Foujita, envisioned here. Painted in 1957 when Foujita was 71 years of age, Lot 72, 'Les Deux Amies' is a private painting in scale at 18 x 13 inches. The piece and curtain are intensely affected by works from the Italian Renaissance and the faces give off an impression of being a response to twentieth century oddity, which shows Foujita's proceeded with interest in the West. The figures are laid out in dark ink and the outside of the composition is razor-slight which harkens back to Foujita's utilization of customary Japanese methods, making this work an exemplary illustration of Foujita's merging of two distinct universes. We are extremely satisfied to have the chance to offer this uncommon work for sale to the public. The past year has given us a new appreciation for in-home dining with beautiful tablescapes and place settings! Thursday's sale, Dining at Home, has everything you need to set the perfect table! With over 500 lots of silver and porcelain tableware, stemware, and decorative objects, featuring coveted names like Herend, Royal Copenhagen, Dodie Thayer, Hermès, Tiffany & Co., Buccellati, Georg Jensen, Lalique, Baccarat, and more! Media Source: AuctionDaily
Collection of Late Philanthropist Don Marron
The Wall Street Journal described three New York galleries as "longtime rivals" for selling the collection of late philanthropist Donald Marron. Pace, Gagosian, and Acquavella planned to privately sell over 300 works totaling US $450 million. Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Ed Ruscha, etc. are among the artists included. How exactly the trio managed to pull it off, particularly with competition from Sotheby’s, Christie’s, and Phillips, may never be public knowledge. “The joy of private sales,” quipped Pace president Marc Glimcher. Many in the industry were surprised by this agreement. In recent news reports, three prominent auction houses were reported to have engaged in aggressive negotiations. The Wall Street Journal report noted that the houses guaranteed that at least $300 million would be paid for the paintings by Donald Marron's widow, Catie Marron. The auction house may be assertive because of its new owner, Patrick Dahi, and the need to make a big splash in its first year. Michael Plummer, the co-founder of Arvest Partners, saw potential in a Christie's partnership. According to a report that cites Pinault, "We know [Christie's owner François] and his family like taking risks on big deals." There are good reasons for the auction houses to be aggressive. According to Artnet Analytics, 35% fewer lots crossed the auction block in 2013 with an estimate above $10 million than in 2012. Additionally, many are concerned that Brexit, Coronavirus, and the upcoming US elections will continue to impact markets. The three New York galleries who won the rights to the collection are framing it as a critique of the auction model, which will make matters worse for auction houses. Glimcher said one of the main reasons the trio teamed up was to "make a point" about how galleries can compete with auction houses. Glimcher told the Wall Street Journal that the talk about numbers and bidding was uninspiring to [Catie Marron's widow]. “Private sales are private, and sometimes that’s an advantage.” A previous report from Artnet highlighted the conceivable procurement of Donald Marron's assortment by a significant sales management firm as motivation to anticipate a turnaround "from a genuinely fair 2019." Now, those expectations lie in the assortment of land big shots Harry and Linda Macklowe, whose separate from procedures prompted a court-requested offer of their assortment, worth an expected $700 million. Artnet anticipates that those pieces should go to sell as right on time as spring. In the interim, Pace, Gagosian, and Acquavella get ready for the offer of Don Marron's 300+ piece assortment. The threesome will have an occasion on April 24th, observing Marron's achievement. In spite of the fact that it is indistinct which compositions or drawings will feature the occasion. Furthermore, the exhibitions likewise are not precluding the chance of selling a few pieces before that date. They can't bear to sell the assortment gradually. Among a couple of subtleties, we think about the association is that Pace, Gagosian, and Acquavella consented to purchase any piece from Catie Marron that they can't sell. "It was a large chunk of change, so we need to convey—we can't send any works back to her," Bill Acquavella of Acquavella Galleries told the Wall Street Journal. Be that as it may, while it is a tumultuous time for the exhibitions, it is additionally a significant second to respect the memory of Don Marron. Marron established the Wall Street firm D.B. Marron and Co. in 1959. His initial gathering enthusiasm lay in Hudson River compositions. In any case, he developed to see the value in more present-day pieces as time passed by. He proceeded to assist PaineWebber for more than 20 years with their assortment as the organization's administrator. What's more, he filled in as the leader of the Museum of Modern Art, where he likewise gave pieces from his assortment. He passed on of a coronary failure last December, matured 85. Media Source: AuctionDaily
Ait Ben Haddou Kasbah
The ksar, a group of earthen buildings surrounded by high walls, is a traditional pre-Saharan habitat. The houses crowd together within the defensive walls, which are reinforced by corner towers. Ait-Ben-Haddou, in Ouarzazate province, is a striking example of the architecture of southern Morocco. Located in the foothills on the southern slopes of the High Atlas in the Province of Ouarzazate, the site of Ait-Ben-Haddou is the most famous ksar in the Ounila Valley. The Ksar of Aït-Ben-Haddou is a striking example of southern Moroccan architecture. The ksar is a mainly collective grouping of dwellings. Inside the defensive walls which are reinforced by angle towers and pierced with a baffle gate, houses crowd together - some modest, others resembling small urban castles with their high angle towers and upper sections decorated with motifs in clay brick - but there are also buildings and community areas. It is an extraordinary ensemble of buildings offering a complete panorama of pre-Saharan earthen construction techniques. The oldest constructions do not appear to be earlier than the 17th century, although their structure and technique were propagated from a very early period in the valleys of southern Morocco. The site was also one of the many trading posts on the commercial route linking ancient Sudan to Marrakesh by the Dra Valley and the Tizi-n'Telouet Pass. Architecturally, the living quarters form a compact grouping, closed and suspended. The community areas of the ksar include a mosque, a public square, grain threshing areas outside the ramparts, a fortification and a loft at the top of the village, an caravanserai, two cemeteries (Muslim and Jewish) and the Sanctuary of the Saint Sidi Ali or Amer. The Ksar of Ait- Ben-Haddou is a perfect synthesis of earthen architecture of the pre-Saharan regions of Morocco. Criterion (iv): The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou is an eminent example of a ksar in southern Morocco illustrating the main types of earthen constructions that may be observed dating from the 17th century in the valleys of Dra, Todgha, Dadès and Souss. Criterion (v): The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou illustrates the traditional earthen habitat, representing the culture of southern Morocco, which has become vulnerable as a result of irreversible socio-economic and cultural changes Integrity (2009) All the structures comprising the ksar are located within the boundaries of the property and the buffer zone protects its environment. The earthen buildings are very vulnerable due to lack of maintenance and regular repair resulting from the abandonment of the ksar by its inhabitants. The CERKAS (Centre for the conservation and rehabilitation of the architectural heritage of atlas and sub-atlas zones) monitors, with difficulty, respect for the visual integrity of the property. Authenticity (2009) In comparison to other ksour of the region, the Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou has preserved its architectural authenticity with regard to configuration and materials. The architectural style is well preserved and the earthen constructions are perfectly adapted to the climatic conditions and are in harmony with the natural and social environment. The large houses in the lower part of the village, with well conserved decorative motifs, are regularly maintained. The construction materials used still remain earth and wood. The inclination to introduce cement has so far been unsuccessful, thanks to the continued monitoring of the «Comité de contrôle des infractions» (Rural Community, Town Planning Division, Urban Agency, CERKAS). Only a few lintels and reinforced concrete escaped its vigilance, but they have been hidden by earthen rendering. Particular attention is also paid to doors and windows giving on to the lanes, to ensure that the wood is not replaced by metal. Protection and management requirements (2009) Protection measures essentially relate to the different laws for the listing of historic monuments and sites, in particular the Law 22-80 concerning Moroccan heritage. The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou currently has a five-year management plan (2007-2012). This management plan is the result of two years of reflection and workshops involving all the persons and institutions concerned with the future of the site, in particular the local populations. The recommendations of this plan are being implemented. Furthermore, two management committees have been established (a local committee and a national one) in which all the parties are represented and cooperate in decision-making. As well as managing the property, CERKAS ensures coordination in the implementation of this management plan. visit our site for more informations...
Larix kaempferi - Japanese larch, Karamatsu (Japanese)
Conservation Status Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern This species has a fairly restricted range in central Honshu, Japan. It is an extremely important timber tree and although it has been heavily exploited over time, there has been supplemental re-planting of the species essentially for commercial reasons. The provenance of the supplemental material is unknown, and it is likely that this comes from forestry sources, which is most likely improved or at least had some selection involved. It is impossible to distinguish natural trees from planted individuals, and there is also inter-breeding, so effectively the whole population is slowly being altered over time to being of mixed genetic origin. To what degree this genetic contamination results in any genetic decline is not known. As it is impossible to distinguish between the wild population and the introduced population, the species has to either be assessed as Data Deficient or Least Concern. Larix kaempferi is a species of mesic sites, occurring from the hills to high in the mountains (500 m to 2,300 m a.s.l.), on the south face of Fuji san it reaches 2,900 m. Unlike the other NE Asiatic larches it occupies better soils, often of recent volcanic origin, and is never found on peat. It is commonly found in association with other conifers, e.g. Pinus densiflora, Picea jezoensis subsp. hondoensis, Tsuga diversifolia, Abies homolepis at lower elevations, and Abies veitchii at higher elevations, but it is clearly a sub-climax species. Several broad-leaved tree genera are present at the lower elevations, e.g. Quercus, Fagus and Betula. Pure 'scrub stands' may occur at the upper limit of trees. Has been heavily exploited in the past for its timber – was used for house building, etc. But after logging, seedlings were planted back in the area again. So although the natural population has been logged, because there has been supplemental planting the exploitation can be considered not to have been that damaging as far as we can tell. The question is whether or not the seedlings were from the same subpopulation or were from a different subpopulation, or worse yet, from cultivated (improved) sources. Without further knowledge about the provenance of the seedling material one has to assume that these are introductions and thus over the long-term the population remains fairly stable. Phytopthora ramorum has been recorded to be sporulating in Larix kaempferi plants planted in Europe: if this were to spread to the native population in Japan, it could pose a problem. Japanese larch is an important timber tree in Japan and in Europe (Scotland), where it has been introduced in 1834. The wood is similar to that of European larch and is used for construction, railway sleepers, pit props and the pulp industry. It is also a frequently planted amenity tree in parks and large gardens and a limited number of cultivars are known. In Scotland, a spontaneous hybrid occurred around 1900 between Larix kaempferi and Larix decidua which was named Larix x eurolepis Henry (but is correctly named Larix x marschlinsii Coaz based on an earlier crossing event) and shows marked F1 hybrid vigour or heterosis. Its seed cones resemble those of Larix kaempferi with recurved scale apices, but are larger. This fast growing hybrid became much favoured by foresters and has been propagated and planted widely in many parts of Europe, often involving back-crosses with either parents. Despite this greater production of timber per ha/year of the hybrid, Japanese larch remains an important plantation tree for timber on poorer soils, where neither the hybrid not the other parent do so well and where much of Europe's plantation forestry is situated (the better soils being occupied by agriculture mostly for food crops). Part of the range falls inside a protected area, but much is outside. Larix kaempferi has also been planted back into the Yatsukaga-Chushin Kogen Quasi National Park. https://conifersgarden.com/encyclopedia/larix/larix-kaempferi
Pinus mugo - Dwarf mountain pine, European mountain pine, Mugo pine, Swiss mountain pine
Conservation Status Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern Global and European regional assessment: Least Concern. As this pine is widespread, with a large extent of occurrence (EOO), area of occupancy (AOO) and population, and in most cases occurs in areas where it is not threatened by human activities, and has few significant declines, it is assessed as Least Concern. Pinus mugo subsp. rotundata has a much more limited distribution and is restricted to mid-elevation peat bogs. Habitat loss due to afforestation and drainage has resulted in a reduction in its AOO and this subspecies has been assessed as Endangered. However, as this subspecies represents a relatively small part of the global population of Pinus mugo, the overall assessment for the species does not change. This species has received more names than any other conifer, some of these are still in use especially in eastern Europe. The species has two principal growth forms, commonly recognized as distinct taxa: a shrub-like, sometimes nearly decumbent form (subsp. mugo) and an upright shrub or erect tree (subsp. rotundata), which occupy different habitats. The shrubby form grows on mountain slopes and ridges generally from about 1,000 m to 2,300 m a.s.l. in the mountain ranges of Europe most exposed to storms associated with depression systems in the North Atlantic. Especially in the Carpathians, it forms dense mat-like thickets above montane forests dominated by Fagus or Picea; in the western Alps the upright form (subspecies) dominates on nutrient poor slopes. Pinus mugo in the eastern Alps may have replaced original Larch-Arolla pine woods which were disturbed by human activities and grazing of their animals. The species often occurs on dolomite limestone, but is in fact indifferent to soil type; this prevalence probably has historical reasons. While upright stands of Pinus mugo subsp. rotundata can have fairly rich plant communities, the species associated with the decumbent subsp. mugo are much fewer due to harsh environmental conditions, such as exposure and long-lasting snow cover. Pinus mugo subsp. rotundata occurs mostly in and around peat bogs and its habit, from shrub to upright tree, seems to depend on soil drainage with the low shrub form in wet moor habitat. No significant, range-wide threats have been identified for this species or for Pinus mugo subsp. mugo. Tourist and recreation-related developments (e.g. ski resorts and ski runs) could have some effect at a very localized level and acid rain in the eastern parts of its range may also be a problem (Boratynski et al. 2009). Pinus mugo subsp. rotundata has a more limited distribution than the typical subspecies and is also restricted to peat bogs. Many of these have been drained and afforested with Picea abies. As a result this subspecies has been assessed as Endangered (see Farjon 2013). The shrubby subspecies (mugo) of Dwarf mountain pine has been used in some parts of northern Europe to stabilize drifting sand dunes and as initial shelter belts for plantations with Scots pine in similar sandy areas. In horticulture it is mainly planted in spaces created by roundabouts and other types of road intersection, both in Europe and in the USA. For gardens many cultivars that remain more dwarfish than the subspecies mugo have been and are being selected, and some of these are suitable in larger rock gardens as they grow very slowly. For this reason this species has also been used in bonsai culture. The tree form (subsp. rotundata) is too uncommon and also grows too slowly to be of importance as a timber tree. Its horticultural interest is limited to arboreta, where it is often labelled as a distinct species (Pinus uncinata) and can grow into an erect small tree. Hybrids have been described between subsp. mugo and subsp. rotundata, and such plants may also occasionally be in cultivation. As with other pines, this species produces a resin that has some medicinal uses. The turpentine obtained from the resin of all pines is considered antiseptic and diuretic. It is used internally in the treatment of kidney and bladder complaints and as a rub and steam bath in the treatment of rheumatic disorders. In the form of liniment plasters, poultices, herbal steam baths and inhalers it is also used for respiratory complaints such as coughs and colds and a variety of skin problems, such as sores and boils. An essential oil obtained from the young twigs is used medicinally and also in woody perfumeries. A vanillin flavouring is obtained as a by-product of other resins that are released from the pulpwood. Pitch could also be obtained from the resin and a tan or green dye obtained from the needles and the wood has reportedly been used to make shoes (Plants for a Future 2014). A herbal tea is also made from the needles in Bulgaria (Frankis and Earle 1999). This species is recorded from more than 50 Natura 2000 protected areas throughout its range (EUNIS 2014), such as the Tatry National Park in Poland. It has been planted ornamentally and it is conserved ex situ in 154 botanic gardens worldwide (BCGI 2013). Seed is conserved in seed banks, such as in Paver, Italy (ENSCO 2014). https://conifersgarden.com/encyclopedia/pinus/pinus-mugo
Pinus durangensis - Durango pine, Pino blanco, Pino real (Spanish)
Conservation Status Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened The large extent of occurrence and the area of occupancy based on comprehensive locality sampling and a grid width of 10 km because this is a forest forming species, both place it outside a threatened category. However, exploitation has reduced formerly “extensive pure forests in Durango and southern Chihuahua… to only scattered, open stands over most of its range” (Perry 1991). It is therefore listed as Near Threatened as it nearly meets the criteria A2cd; B2ab(ii,iii,v) for listing as threatened. Although this decline has not ceased there is insufficient data to allocate one of the threatened categories. The change in status since the previous assessment of Least Concern, can therefore be seen as a genuine recent change. Populations have been substantially reduced within the last 25 years due to exploitation, fires and forest clearance. The decline is ongoing. In the Sierra Madre this species is an important constituent of the 'yellow pine' forest, where it occurs in pure stands or mixed with several other species of pine, e.g. Pinus arizonica, Pinus leiophylla, and Pinus engelmannii, or in pine-oak forests. This pine is adapted to grow on shallow, rocky soils, but its better stands are found on deeper soils, where it can successfully compete with most other pines. The soils are mostly derived from volcanic rock. At the highest elevation Pinus durangensis occurs with Abies and/or Cupressus lusitanica, at the lowest with Juniperus deppeana and Pinus oocarpa. Other pines are Pinus montezumae, Pinus teocote and in the southern part of its range Pinus ayacahuite can occur with it. In addition this species is associated with Quercus sideroxyla, Quercus rugosa, Pinus ayacahuite and Pseudotsuga (Garcia and Gonzalez 2003). Durango pine is an important timber tree. It grows straight and tall and is (or was) abundant and wide spread in many areas within its range. Logging from natural stands at the current rate is unsustainable and plantations are now being attempted in the state of Durango. The timber is used for construction such as roof beams, general carpentry, furniture, floors, and plywood. This species is virtually unknown in horticulture. https://conifersgarden.com/rare-conifers/pinus-durangensis