esraozcelik376
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Turkey - Muğla / Bodrum

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@esraozcelik376 I tried the Jordan coffee way, they boild it in the pot, and then drink it. It is completely different with what we drink in Vietnam. I think in Vietnam, we did also the different unique style to drink coffee up till now :) You should google vietnamese coffee drinking culture. YOu would suprised as well :)
You did a pretty congratulations research. :) I know it would be more painful than the Arab coffee with sugar, we might as well on request ..
Well, it is good for me to read more about Turkish coffee hehee
In the Arab world, "Turkish" coffee is the most common kind of coffee. It is called Arabic coffee (qahwa ‘arabiyya, قهوة عربية ). Constructions such as "Egyptian coffee," "Syrian coffee," "Lebanese coffee," and "Iraqi coffee" draw a distinction in the flavor, preparation, or presentation of different kinds of Turkish coffee. In Jordan many drive-through coffee shops call it boiled coffee (qahwa ghali, قهوة غلي ) as opposed to the other kind of coffee that is pre-boiled in a big container and continuously heated which is called poured coffee (qahwa sabb, قهوة صب ).
@Tapsamai Turkish coffee is optionally sweetened or unsweetened. Served with a glass of water as a chocolate or Turkish delight is served, is also a very nice smell of coffee ..
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Visiting the City of Gunsan in South Korea
Korea has a complicated, heartbreaking history, but in Gunsan the struggle to grapple with the past is especially strong. In cities like Seoul, most of the city was torn apart first by the Japanese then by the Korean war, and then again in the 80s by the desire to "modernize." So when you look at Seoul, you have to actively look for pieces of hardships of the 20th century. Gunsan though was not touched by the Korean war (except for losing their train station) so all of the architecture from the 1920s that the Japanese built while they colonized the country and set up a system of taking all of their food, remains. Gunsan does a fantastic job of showcasing the history while also standing up for Korea and sharing the hardships the citizens went through during this time. It was a great history lesson and I'm thankful that they had so much info in English! First stop was Cafe Teum, an old grainery that turned into a cafe after it was abandoned and in disarry. Then I went to the Hitotsu House, a two story Japanese style house in the center of the Shinheungdong neighborhood where all the rich Japanese people lived before the 1950s. It's very rare to see any Japanese architecture in Korea because it was all torn down by the war or by citizens wanting to tear down what the colonizers left behind. Next was Dongguksa, the only Japanese style temple left in Korea. It was stunning and so peaceful with a little tea house and tons of bamboo. Last up was the rail town and architecture museum which I adored. I learned so much on this trip and I hope you learned something too :) Watch my trip there here:
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