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love this idea and the last one!!!! it reminds me of fruits basket!!! XD
What a cute XD
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What Your Birthstone Says About You
January - Garnet Garnet, the birthstone for January, signifies eternal friendship and trust and is the perfect gift for a friend. Garnet, derived from the word granatum, means “seed,” and is called so because of the gemstone's resemblance to a pomegranate seed. References to the gemstone dates back to 3100 B.C., when the Egyptians used garnets as inlays jewelry. Constancy, Loyalty. February - Amethyst Amethyst, the birthstone for February, is believed by ancient Greeks and Romans to ward off temptation, also is said to keep the wearer clear-headed and quick-witted. Throughout history, the gemstone has been associated with many myths, legends, religions, and numerous cultures. English regalia were even decorated with amethysts during the Middle Ages to symbolize royalty. Serenity, Peace. March - Aquamarine The name aquamarine is derived from the Latin word aqua, meaning water, and marina, meaning the sea. This gemstone was believed to protect sailors, as well as to guarantee a safe voyage. The serene color of aquamarine is said to cool the temper, allowing the wearer to remain calm and levelheaded. Its pale, cool color beautifully complements spring and summer wardrobes. Courage, Health. April - Diamond As the April birthstone, diamonds are the ideal gift for a loved one, with more choices now than ever. These stones are strong, eternal, and came from time and extreme pressure. Innocence, Love. May - Emerald As the birthstone for May, the emerald, a symbol of rebirth, is believed to grant the owner foresight, good fortune, and youth. Emerald, derived from the word smaragdus, meaning green in Greek, was mined in Egypt as early as 330 B.C. Happiness, fertility. June - Pearl, Alexandrite For centuries, pearls have been used as an adornment., and were one of the favorite gem materials of the Roman Empire. Later in Tudor England, the 1500s were known as the pearl age. Pearls are unique as they are the only gems from living sea creatures and require no faceting or polishing to reveal their natural beauty. Balance, Joy. July - Ruby There’s no better way to demonstrate your love than by giving a ruby in celebration of a July birthday. Rubies arouse the senses, stir the imagination, and are said to guarantee health, wisdom, wealth and success in love. Nobility, Beauty. August - Peridot Peridot is said to host magical powers and healing properties to protect against nightmares and to bring the wearer power, influence, and a wonderful year. As peridot is a gemstone that forms deep inside the earth and brought to the surface by volcanoes, in Hawaii, peridot symbolizes the tears of Pele, the goddess of fire and volcanoes. Felicity, Protection. September - Sapphire Sapphire, the September birthstone, has been popular since the Middle Ages and, according to folklore, will protect your loved ones from envy and harm. Medieval clergy wore sapphires to symbolize heaven, while commoners thought the gem attracted heavenly blessings. Wisdom, Calmness. October - Opal, Tourmaline The name opal derives from the Greek Opallos, meaning "to see a change (of color)." Opals range in color from milky white to black with flashes of yellow, orange, green, red, and blue. Balance, Endurance. November - Topaz Topaz is a gemstone available in a rich rainbow of colors. Prized for several thousands of years in antiquity, all yellow gems for a time were called topaz. The most prized color of topaz is called Imperial topaz after the Russian Czars of the 1800s, and features a magnificent orange body color with pink undertones. Friendship, strength. December - Turquoise, Zircon The name turquoise, from the French expression Pierre tourques or Turkish stone, originated in the thirteenth century and describes one of the oldest known gemstones. Wisdom, wealth. What is your birthstone!?
How to make a ring jewelry candle | Jewelry In Candles Rings
If you're looking for a way to make your home smell great, give jewelry candles a shot. These candles are made with real jewelry and actually burn down like regular candles. While they cost more than the regular run-of-the-mill scented candles you can buy at the store, they sure have an impressive visual effect that makes them worth it. This post takes us through all the steps involved in making your own jewelry candle and gives tips on how to get really creative with it. 1. What you'll need to make a jewelry candle To make a jewelry candle you'll need: candle wicks, votive holders, jewelry findings, jewelry, and essential oils (optional). To make a jewelry candle, you’ll need ingredients you can find at a jewelry store. The general ingredients are: Cotton (linen preferred, but hemp works as well) Eggs (colored varieties are greatest), Pellets or brick, Chaff Distilled white vinegar Freshly ground black pepper Oil These are the basic tools you’ll need to prepare the candles. It is recommended to invest in a candle maker for the process, as they make it a lot easier when applying the wax and other products to the candle. You can buy candles directly from jewelry stores or directly from cosmetic supply companies such as chemhalt — they make candle containers, handles, holders, and the like. Wire cutters, a small piece of cardboard, a tin can, and a knife are useful tools for cutting up candles for candles. To get started, take a wick from your jewelry store. For this jewelry candle, I used an ivory candle wick from Sally Hansen. Craft wax will usually work, but it’s probably a good idea to try wax candles if you choose to do so. Pellets and bricks should cost around $10 each, but if you can find them used, they’re probably not too expensive. You can also find candles pre-sterilized in jewelry stores. Next, you’ll need to find votive holders. I suggest purchasing gray votive holders because they’re easier to see your candle in the light. Next, you’ll need to find jewelry. You can buy jewelry at the jewelry from unrivaled candles, but it’s going to have to be colored. If you have a lot of pink jewelry, you can really use the candles to lighten up the room and make it feel more festive. 2. How to make a ring-shaped jewelry candle Ring-shaped candles are a neat way to make a candle that looks like jewelry. If you want to make one, you’ll need a candle mold, which you can get from unrivaled candles. It will give you the opportunity to make variations of the same ring shape that will fit nicely inside your candle mold. The jewelry candles we made had practical uses. One I made was a sort of travel mug that took up very little room. Another was meant to give off a warm ambiance in my office for cooking. First, you’ll need to empty your jewelry drawer. Then you’ll need clean, dry, and free of oils (unflavored) jewelry screws. And finally, you’ll need something that looks nice (preferably cotton). When used correctly, the jewelry screws will hold ceramic rods in jewelry molds and make the candle bigger and therefore better smelling. One way to clean your screw heads is with a cotton bud soaked in pink Master Cleaner (it comes in a can). You can also use a toothbrush dipped in it, but wire brush will also cause the jewelry to become powdery and you won’t be able to see the patterns that you’re creating or stain your fingers. Next, you’ll need to make your ring. As stated above, you want your beads to be wearable, not precious. These links will give you ideas for what kind of beads to use. You should be able to fit around 30–40 beads in your candle. Aside from choosing a distance between beads and ring, you may want to experiment with sewing or gluing the beads together. If you’re squirreling away in your jewelry drawer as little as I do, you’re probably bored of clicking pictures of plexiglass boxes and rings that look almost identical. To make your beads go in more easily, you can also use a special ring punch to punch them out. You’ll also need something to fill your candle with. 3. How to make a necklace-shaped jewelry candle If you're looking for a project to do with your daughter, or just for yourself, making a necklace-shaped candle is a fun project that can also be made in a variety of colors and styles. You can find all the materials you'll need at a craft store, and the project itself is pretty simple. You can use metal or plastic beads ornaments, ordinary household items, or jewelry. Beads can be purchased already made or otherwise perfected, and things can be salvaged that you may have discarded, like old locket pins, metal fish scales, ornaments from party stores, or even jewelry cut down to the right size or in the appropriate vintage settings.  The instructions for making your necklace candle are fairly flexible, and you can find extensive step-by-step instructions on the unrivaled candles website. The general steps are to cut the beads to size or to buy smaller versions of the beads you want.  You can make the candle factory scent or any of the pleasant scents like bay leaf or sandalwood. I opted for trying out a variety of real pieces of jewelry to scent. If you intend to just use a basic plastic beads jewelry box, you can find the instructions for making a jewelry box here. To start, lily of the valley scented candles are the way to go. Previously, I used beeswax candles with mixed results, so I was pleasantly surprised when I used a box of crystal jewelry beads. They are nice because they magnify the scent from your finger, creating an entire floral scent that goes well with the candles. You could also use real ball-peen hammers, moon balls, or stars as the candle-holder. 4. Making candles from other pieces of jewelry Ten years ago, I wanted to make a candle out of a ring from my jewelry collection. I thought it would be a fun project and a great way to re-purpose my old jewelry. I tried it and it worked. The result was a beautiful, personalized candle. I decided to make the same candle for my home to make it work better. I wanted it to last longer, look nicer, and smell like real jewelry. I didn’t want it to smell like replacement jewelry. I also didn’t want it to burn down like regular candles do, so I skipped the aluminum ring and went with sterling silver instead. To get started, I cut rings exactly the size and shape I wanted my candle to have! Then I decided on the design I wanted and the design I bought. I used hot glue to secure it to the metal ring. Before using the hot glue, I applied two coats of the wax of my choice. This includes Irish Moss, Kentucky Bourbon Barrel, and Loire Valley Rose. The wax flavor depends on the project or what you’re using it for. Now the fun part. If you have some jewelry already that you don’t need anymore, you can keep it or sell it. After all, you’re not trying to start a business here! I bought rings that repaired a hole I had in my finger. I also bought new earrings just because I thought they would fit better and look nicer in the candle. I sold my earrings after I made my jewelry candle. I used these rings as templates when cutting the rings for the wax candle. I taped them to the metal ring to keep track of where I was cutting. To attach the wax to the rings, I tried to be as accurate as I could. After applying the wax, I screwed in the metal bases to the rings and pressed the small screws into the top of the rings to secure. 5. Tips for making the best jewelry candles Making candles can be a fun and creative craft project. It’s also a great way to repurpose old jewelry you don’t wear anymore. Just melt down old necklaces and earrings, and then pour the molten metal into a mold to create a decorative candle you can burn and enjoy. The first thing you’ll need for making jewelry candle is jewelry. You can find jewelry melts easily online. you can search for a jewelry candle to see what is currently trending. There are tons of options, from traditional pieces like bandanas and medal charms to more modern pieces like earrings and bracelets. Once you have your metal, it’s time to find a gift idea for your loved one. There are so many ways you can show love for someone, from repairing an old broken engagement ring to simply buying them a beautifully-crafted jewelry candle that smells like their heart. What’s a way to give someone priceless as a surprise? While jewelry is an appropriate gift for many occasions, on Valentine’s Day, it’s especially sweet. You can use your existing jewelry collection to give the person a gift that will truly remind them of the special day. It will also make the person feel special. From necklaces to earrings, you can make dozens of look-alike gift items using jewelry melting wax. Fiddle with the sizing of the melted wax to get the perfect look and safety. Keep the gift wrapped in the original packaging and an unopened jewelry candle inside the gift box. Glue it to a small, square scrap of cardboard or envelope, and you’ve got a card they can use to proudly display their lovely gift to someone special. Some people make their jewelry candle permanent for extra love and care. It pretty much ensures the person who receives it is reminded of the special occasion from the moment they receive it.
DIY Macrame Bracelet
You’ll need: 4 yards of 0.5mm chinese knotting cord a connector or charm an embroidery needle a pair of scissors flat nose pliers (optional) a lighter (optional) Start by cutting the knotting cord into two 30 inch, two 20 inch and one 10 inch lengths. Fold the 20 inch piece in half, pull the loop through the ring, fold it over the ring, and pull the rest of the cord through the loop. Repeat the step on the other side of the ring. These strands will be anchored and remain stationary. Center the 30 inch cord under the two middle strands. Fold the right cord over the middle strands and under the left cord. Pull the left cord under the right and middle strands and through the loop on the right side. Pull tightly and slide the knot up to the top. Finish the 2nd half of the square knot by folding the left cord over the middle strands and under the right cord. Pull the right cord under the left and middle strands and through the loop on the left side. Pull tightly and repeat the steps – left, right, left, right . . . Continue knotting until the desired length is reached. Keep in mind that the clasp will take up approximately half an inch. To finish the knots, thread one of the cords onto a needle and sew up the center of 3-4 knots along the backside. Pliers will help pull the needle through the tight knots. Repeat the same step on the other cord. After sewing up both knotting cords, trim away any excess. Save the scraps and melt the tips with a lighter to seal it for extra hold. Repeat the same exact step on the second half of the bracelet. To make a sliding closure, shape the bracelet into a circle and overlap the middle strands. Use scraps to temporarily tie the cords together at each end. Take the 10 inch cord and center it under the strands. Start tying square knots exactly the same way the bracelet was executed. Stop at about half an inch and sew the knotting cords into the backside of the closure. Remove the temporary ties. The two sets of middle strands are now the adjustable ties of the bracelet. Adjust to fit the wrist and tie each end into knots. Trim away any excess. Your adjustable knotted bracelets are finished!! xx