YinofYang
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Alder House

My Photography/©CGeske Photography The Alder House is the oldest of all the glass blowing studios in the Northwest. It's still run by the same man who established it years ago. One of the great things about this place is you can sit down and watch them make glass in front of you. It was such a cool experience. If you're ever in Lincoln City, Oregon, check this place out.
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@roselee89 I totally agree with you. I also wish it received more recognition. I went to this place twice and spent a lot of time there. It's so fascinating and their works are so beautiful. Yep, machines can never do what glassblowers do.
Glass Blowing, it's so inspiring and definitely one of the most forgotten jobs. I wish that they would get more credit about their work without everything having to be replaced by machines.
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The Works of Dale Chihuly The Atlantis Collection
ABOVE - A detail of "The Crystal Gate" installation in the Atlantis Resort, Nassau, The Bahamas. Dale Chihuly is a blown glass designer/sculptor whose works are considered unique to the field of blown glass, "moving it into the realm of large-scale sculpture". His works are legendary in the realm of art glass and he is considered a modern master through his mixing of traditional glass blowing techniques (learned in Venice Italy) and new techniques he’s developed to create works of mind-blowing intricacy and scale. Since a serious car accident in 1976 left him blinded in one eye and a body surfing accident in 1979 left him unable to hold the glass blowing pipe. He has since hired others to do the manual labor in bringing his designs to life. He calls himself “more of a choreographer than a dancer… more of a supervisor than a participant… more a director than an actor.” His large installations are on display in permanent collections all over the world, including in the United States, Canada, England, Singapore, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, and Nassau, the Bahamas at the Atlantis Resort. ABOVE - A detail of "The Crystal Gate" installation in the Atlantis Resort, Nassau, The Bahamas. The challenges in shooting such amazing works of art are many: SCALE - These massive installations are so large and complex that to capture the truly amazing detail and unique beauty of each you really need to shoot close-up images. The scale is then lost. But to shoot wide to establish each work in the environment they were places (designed for), you loose the finer details that make these works so awe inspiring. I knew when I was booked to shoot a corporate event in the Atlantis that the four large Chihuly installations were top of my list for my own "must shoot" items for the trip. I'd seen wide photo after wide photo and once on site and standing in amazement at their complexity and detail I decided to shoot long and tight - opting to not focus on scale so much as detail but knowing that certain angles would convey the size of their settings and therefore express their monumental size. LOCATION - These works of art are the show pieces of the busiest part of the resort, the casino. There isn't a time day or night that these works of art are not surrounded by people. Having the time to set up a shot and take it would be difficult. LOCATION - Because photography in the casino proper is not allowed, I was limited to the angles I could select. This meant going for my 300mm f/2.8 lens - large, heavy, and in need of some sort of support (i.e. tripod or monopod). It wasn't going to be possible to stop in a busy walkway and set up a tripod - so I decided to experiment with hand-held shots. LOCATION - Again, because of the location I couldn't increase shutter speed with the use of a speedlight. Flash photography was strictly prohibited inside the resort. The areas these installations occupied were dimly lit, which worked to the advantage of their display (since they are all internally lit), but with large lenses you have the hand-held rule of photography - if you don't want blur from the lens shaking you must shoot the second equivalent of the total focal length of the lens. Meaning I had to shoot at 1/350 second or higher to keep from having shake/blur in the images from holding that massive lens hand-held. I adjusted ISO to compensate and I used anything I could to steady my body/arms as I hoisted 12lbs of camera and lens up to get my shots. ABOVE -At the main entrance of the Atlantis Casino, "The Crystal Gate" installation stands 18 feet tall. Made of individual crystal glass shafts (3,100 to be exact), it is an amazing work of beauty as well as being a feat of design and engineering. Weighing over 30,000 pounds, it simply is an astoundingly beautiful and complex sculpture. Chihuly Atlantis Exhibits – Dale Chihuly was commissioned by the owner and builder of The Atlantis to make four grand statement works for the casino. Each is insured for over a million US dollars, they are all uniquely individual yet collectively appropriate for the design and theme of the Atlantis's main casino. The Crystal Gate - The Crystal Gate is a glittering tower of crystal soaring nearly 20 feet into the air at the entrance to the Atlantis Casino weighing 30,000 pounds and is made of 3,100 hand-blown crystals. It is the grand statement piece as you enter the casino – a marvel of crystal shapes and forms. It was by far my favorite piece, the pure scale and ambition of it spoke to me. I took dozens of photos of it and each angle reveals a new character and symmetry. ABOVE - The Temple of the Moon rests atop a large elevated platform. It sits opposite the casino from The Temple of the Sun. Between the two in the center of the room, suspended from the ceiling, is the Seaform Chandelier. Temple of the Moon & The Temple of the Sun - The challenge was to bring beauty to paradise -- and the Sun and Moon. Chihuly was commissioned to make dazzling yet approachable sculpture for the new Atlantis Resort Hotel on Paradise Island in the Bahamas. SPECIAL NOTE - Having the ability to step OUTSIDE the casino and shoot a photo such as the one above is one of the many reasons why I will ALWAYS travel with a super-telephoto lens. Having a 300, 400, 500, or 600mm lens available makes shots like the one above a reality. ABOVE - The Temple of the Moon – Each of the surface "plates" of the Temple of the Moon in itself is an amazing work of art. Cobalt blue mixes with silverish white and translucent blues to create a soothing and symmetrical opposite to the Temple of the Sun across the casino. “I knew I could create the sun very successfully, but the moon would have to somehow be blown and constructed in an entirely original way. I knew it would be difficult and force me to make something new.” ~ Dale Chihuly Beautifully rendered relief paintings of the twelve signs of the zodiac circle the Sun and Moon installations. BELOW - The dynamic and explosive colors and design of the Temple of the Sun are indeed a striking contrast to the relaxing and calming coolness of the Temple of the Moon. Temple of the Sun – The Temple of the Sun is a giant ball of flame-like tentacles of yellow, orange, and red elements radiating from its globe. It resembles a fearsome underwater creature of beauty and mystery while at the same time it could also easily be said that it is a representation of the violence and danger that reaches out from the center of every star into space. The Temple of the Sun has more than 2,300 yellow, orange, and red elements radiating from a fiery globe atop a replica of a Mayan temple. AND THEN THERE WAS THE SEA - BELOW - In the center of the room, caught between the two extremes of the sun and moon rests the Seaform Chandelier. The Seaform Chandelier – Featuring 900 unique hand blown elements depicting a wide assortment of ocean life in abstract form; this stunning 12ft diameter glass sculpture is located in the center of the Bacarat Lounge within sight of the two massive “Temple” sculptures. It features a number of instantly recognizable ocean shapes such starfish and then flows into shapes reminiscent of dolphins and other aquatic life. It is also an interesting "buffer" between the two extremes of the Temples. There are hints of gold and reds found in the Temple of the Sun, and cooler whites and bluish grey found in the Temple of the Moon. BELOW - In and around the casino are numerous smaller Chihuly works known as Macchia Bowls. Macchia Bowls - Derived from the Latin macula, the Italian word “macchia” connotes simply a stain or a spot, but it has a much richer range of meaning. Since the Renaissance, macchia has been associated with a sketchy way of applying the initial color to a drawing or painting. Particularly appropriate for the late style of the Venetian painter Titian, the word characterizes his emphasis on brushwork and summary treatment of form. In the seventeenth century, macchia designated the special quality of improvisational sketches that appear to be nature’s miraculous creation rather than mere human work. When Chihuly appropriates the term “Macchia” for his series, he gives back to the word some of its traditional meanings, particularly the emphasis on spontaneity, on artistic collaboration with technique rather than mere control of it. There is an undeniable sense of continuity and purpose to the master works on display at the Atlantis. Each piece although completely unique in design, shape, and color, flows into the next as a collective series should. Each alone is breathtaking and awe inspiring; but together they are an experience. The Atlantis is a destination without question, but the entire island of Nassau offers a unique treasure of culture and history that should not be missed if you ever have the chance to visit. For me, the chance to experience these beautiful installations in person and then be challenged in attempting to capture their beautify in photographs was one of the many highlights of my trip. © Copyright 2011-2015, Jon Patrick Hyde, All Rights Reserved.
20년간 배웅하는 부모님을 기록한, 포토그래퍼 디에나 다이크먼
헤어짐과 배웅(Leaving and waving) 20년간 배웅하는 부모님을 기록한 사진이 세간의 화제다. 이는 미국 출신의 포토그래퍼 디에나 다이크먼(Deanna Dikeman)이 포착한 것. 그녀는 수많은 다른 부모들처럼 집을 나설 때면, 문 앞까지 인사해 주시는 부모님이 계셨다. 1991년 어느 날, 이런 평화로운 세월이 영원히 지속되지 않을 것이라는 걸 깨달은 후 20년이 넘는 기간 동안 똑같이 자동차 창문을 내리고 손 흔들어주시는 부모님을 찍게 된 그녀. 디에나 다이크먼은 1995년 다정히 서있는 모습부터 자동차 뒷좌석에서 손녀딸을 쳐다보는 사진, 지팡이를 든 채 배웅하는 장면 그리고 2009년 아버지가 세상을 떠난 뒤 어머니 홀로 있는 상황 등 모든 순간들을 담아냈다. 세월이 지날수록 노쇠해지는 부모님과 링거를 맞은 채 손 흔드는 모습, 마지막 텅 빈 앞마당까지. 2017년을 끝으로 이 시리즈는 마무리되었으며, 2018년 캔자스시티에서 <헤어짐과 배웅(Leaving and waving)>이라는 주제로 전시회가 개최되었다. 변치 않는 자식을 향한 사랑을 기록한 디에나 다이크먼. 가슴을 뭉클하게 만드는 이미지와 전시 당시 그녀가 남긴 말은 아래에서 찬찬히 확인해보자. " 작품의 대부분은 차 안에서 바라본 부모님의 모습이다.시간이 지나도 부모님과 함께 하는 시간은 변하지 않는다는 것을 전하고 싶었다. " 1995 1996 1997-1998 2000-2001 2001 2002-2004 2006 2008 2009 2013 2014 2015 2017 2017 2017 더 자세한 내용은 <아이즈매거진> 링크에서
Best 20 Travel Alarm Clock Under 50$ You Must Buy [2020]
While you are traveling you need a best travel alarm clock to manage your sleep time. The important thing matters in Travel clock is Size and it should be light in weight and easily portable. It is a must that your clock should have a long battery life. Travel clocks are now modified by adding temperature, humidity and date. It is important in the clock that the display is better and can be visible in day and night. So if you’re going to travel somewhere and you’re confused which alarm to buy so don’t worry we’ve listed here some best travel alarm clocks. Wazdorf Digital travel Alarm Clock:- Wazdorf Digital travel alarm clock has an LED screen display. Not only time but Temperature is shown in both F and C. Snooze interval can be set from 5-60 minutes as you need. Both AL and PM format is available in this travel clock. There are five buttons i.e, Mode, Alarm, Sanz/light, Up and down. Pros:- The clock having LED means less effort. There is a Temperature scale available to check the day is good to travel or not. Contains a long 3 AAA battery, Rechargeable. Many customization as you need. The very stylish mirror looks trendy. Cons:- The dimensions of the clock are very big. The glass on LED makes it very attentive we have to travel very carefully. You have to read the manual before using not very handy. Not for very long use. Conclusion:- The clock is very good in terms of looks. Having many functions sometimes make it more complicated. It can be used as a Gift. Long battery life and durability makes it better. It also has ambient display when the clock is charging the screen remains awake but when it is not charging the clock screen sleep after 15 seconds. Buying Guidance:- Battery and built:- The main thing in the travel clock is battery now there are several types of batteries like A battery, AA battery, AAA battery. The battery is made up of lead or poly-lithium. Mainly the button battery is used which are non-rechargeable and made up of graphite. If you want a long-lasting battery then re-chargeable batteries are best. Function:- Sometimes we watch about the functions of the clock. But if too many functions combined and stored in a small space then it may start malfunctioning. So don’t run toward many functions. If there are a temperature scale and time that’s OK. Display:- There are two kinds of display i.e, LED and LCD. But the LED are good because they made up of pixels which can be seen from a distance. The main thing in the display is brightness if there is manually adjust brightness level then it considered as good. https://travellercolic.com/travel-alarm-clock-reviews/
I Went To The Most Haunted University In The USA
When we think of ghost stories we think of bumps in the night, voices, shifting objects and light flickers. When I think of ghost stories, I think of Ohio University. OU is the oldest University in Ohio, and is home to several terrifying legends. Athens, Ohio houses The Ridges (a formerly bonkers insane asylum where they practiced the art form of "Ice Pick" lobotomies EEK), five cemeteries that form a perfect pentagram around the center of campus, and Wilson Hall (a haunted classroom building that used to be a dormitory. Many students heard the screams of a student who committed suicide there in the 1970's). The paranormal activity touches every person that attends OU. It doesn't matter if you're a teacher or student. Somehow, the ghost stories become real. I remember checking in to Ewing Hall on Ohio University's glorious South Green as a lowly freshman. It's the perfect college setting, full of bustling students going to class, people playing Frisbee and catch on the green. A few months into college I remember waking up in the middle of the night to a loud thumping noise above me. I turned over and forgot about it, because it was probably the person above me. Then, I remembered I lived on the 4th floor. [Here I am in my haunted room, Freshman year of college] That was my first encounter with a ghost my friends and I later named Chester. I ended up moving out of that room later in the semester because one opened up next to my friends on the other side of the floor. Chester ended up slamming doors and knocking things over, groaning in the night loud enough for everyone to hear, but he never did anything too spooky. When I moved across the floor to the other side, I thought I had rid myself of Chester the ghost. People on the other side of the floor heard furniture moving around...things being knocked over, screaming from inside my now empty room. We ended up unlocking it with our R.A. and noticed that things had been moved around. The matress was off the bed and the desk had been flung three feet from where I had left it. Chester wasn't happy that I had left. A few days passed and I hadn't heard from my ghost friend. I guess he didn't want to make the trek across the floor to visit me. And that was a good thing. Sophomore year I was in the building next to Ewing...Wray Hall. Herman returned, moving things, flickering lights and stomping violently on the ceiling. I remember yelling "Chester STOP!" and he would. He wasn't exactly friendly, but didn't hurt me any either. Though my personal ghost story might not scare you, these legends from OU's campus definitely will. Let's start with The Ridges. I mentioned that it was a mental hospital, insane asylum not unlike what you saw in the second season of American Horror Story. Some of the Ridges campus is used as a Kennedy Center for Art, but most of it lies abandoned. Though the grounds are lush and green there is something wicked in the air. You have to drive up a steep-ass hill to get to The Ridges. It sits atop an appalachian giant overlooking the busy Ohio University campus. You can see it from almost anywhere. It's a hulking structure, mostly post-victorian with bars all over the windows. As soon as you set foot anywhere near it, you can feel the haunting presence of its ghosts. Trust me. After the great mental health collapse of the early 1900's The Ridges turned into a nightmarish place where patients were treated with electro-shock therapy, ice baths and ice-pick lobotomies (you know, that thing that happens to McMurphy in One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest). Essentially they jammed an ice pick through your eye socket and into your brain to "alleviate pressure" and make you a "normal" person. It ended up killing lots of people and leaving the ones that survived totally brain dead. Several freaky things happened at The Ridges before its doors were shut forever. December 1st of 1978, a patient named Margaret Schilling vanished. According to legend she was playing hide and seek with some nurses. They got distracted and stopped looking for her. She was gone for over a month, until her body was found in her room by a maintenance worker in January of 1979. The fact that someone died at the Ridges isn't too creepy, considering it was a primitive mental hospital, but this is: A stain was left on the floor of her room. And after countless bleachings and cleaning attempts the stain would re-appear. The Journal of Forensic Sciences studied the stain and revealed that it was indeed the result of human decomposition. Margaret was left there for 5 weeks. And every time someone tried to remove the mark, it came back, furthering the proof that she was haunting the grounds of the place she was left to die in. The asylum has a cemetery attached to it as well to act as the burial grounds for the patients that were admitted through the court system who had no friends or family to cover burial costs. My senior year of college I shot a short film with some Film studies graduate students in this cemetery. It was one of the most harrowing experiences of my life. There was definitely bad energy all around. Walking through the cemetery, you can see the unmarked graves. People who died without a name...nobody to mourn them. The cemetery in this picture above is elevated, hidden above the grounds. Some of the stones are marked with flags for veterans who came from the Athens area, but most of them are unmarked. Blank. Nothing. [A tour of the TB ward at The Ridges.] The Tuburculosis Ward at The Ridges is by far the scariest part. This was where the most violent and disturbed people would be quarantined. Most of the They ended up tearing it down my Sophomore year of high school due to a number of things, but I think it's because it was too haunted to be kept standing. There was lead based paint everywhere, broken windows and people kept breaking into it and hurting themselves. It's like Pet Sematary up in there...if you go in, you're cursed forever. [The staff of Brick Beats Magazine at OU in front of the TB ward, hey...I'm in the middle!] So of course, I went there. Being the idiot that I've always been, I was intrigued by the antique structure and the haunted, terrifying lore attached to it. I took some of my friends, who were all working for this music magazine I had become the co-Editor-In-Chief of freshman year. We took some pictures for an issue up there. And man...just looking up at that building...the memory of it gives me the chills. This was shortly before it was torn down. On the way up, one of our cars got stuck, we ended up hearing a lot of screeching and rattling and yes...there were open windows covering us in paranormal fear. I never went back. While i could go on for years about how scary The Ridges is, I'd better move on...to the final tale I'll tell. The most haunted point on campus is Wilson hall. It lies in the center of a "pentagram" created by five cemeteries surrounding the campus. See that star in the middle? That's West Green, a major spot for dormitories and a hub for kids on campus. [Wilson Hall was featured on SyFy's "Scariest Places on Earth". Room 428 is referred to as "Satan's Dormitory"] Room 428 of Wilson hall is the most haunted place in all of Athens. A young man died there in the 1970's, his death was never ruled a suicide or a murder. It was just left unsolved. A young female student died in room 428 later, after allegedly practicing some occult rituals there. She used the room's "dark energy" to practice some kind of witchcraft that enabled her to leave her body through her spirit. People call it "astral projection". She also contacted the dead. According to legend, the girl died violently in the room, smearing her own blood on the walls. Apparently all of the dark spirits in room 428 drove her her to kill herself, but we'll never know. Wilson Hall was built on an Indian Burial ground...that may be the reason for all of the paranormal activity and deaths. School officials closed it off and turned it into a boiler room, but screams and horrific sounds could still be heard. The building is still a dormitory. Athens, Ohio was voted the 13th most haunted place in the world. THE WORLD. I haven't thought about these legends, these hauntings that occured at my alma matter in a while. And with Halloween coming up it's no surprise that they're on my mind. You may not believe in ghosts, but if you ask any Ohio University Bobcat? I'm sure they do.