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Ait Ben Haddou Kasbah
The ksar, a group of earthen buildings surrounded by high walls, is a traditional pre-Saharan habitat. The houses crowd together within the defensive walls, which are reinforced by corner towers. Ait-Ben-Haddou, in Ouarzazate province, is a striking example of the architecture of southern Morocco. Located in the foothills on the southern slopes of the High Atlas in the Province of Ouarzazate, the site of Ait-Ben-Haddou is the most famous ksar in the Ounila Valley. The Ksar of Aït-Ben-Haddou is a striking example of southern Moroccan architecture. The ksar is a mainly collective grouping of dwellings. Inside the defensive walls which are reinforced by angle towers and pierced with a baffle gate, houses crowd together - some modest, others resembling small urban castles with their high angle towers and upper sections decorated with motifs in clay brick - but there are also buildings and community areas. It is an extraordinary ensemble of buildings offering a complete panorama of pre-Saharan earthen construction techniques. The oldest constructions do not appear to be earlier than the 17th century, although their structure and technique were propagated from a very early period in the valleys of southern Morocco. The site was also one of the many trading posts on the commercial route linking ancient Sudan to Marrakesh by the Dra Valley and the Tizi-n'Telouet Pass. Architecturally, the living quarters form a compact grouping, closed and suspended. The community areas of the ksar include a mosque, a public square, grain threshing areas outside the ramparts, a fortification and a loft at the top of the village, an caravanserai, two cemeteries (Muslim and Jewish) and the Sanctuary of the Saint Sidi Ali or Amer. The Ksar of Ait- Ben-Haddou is a perfect synthesis of earthen architecture of the pre-Saharan regions of Morocco. Criterion (iv): The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou is an eminent example of a ksar in southern Morocco illustrating the main types of earthen constructions that may be observed dating from the 17th century in the valleys of Dra, Todgha, Dadès and Souss. Criterion (v): The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou illustrates the traditional earthen habitat, representing the culture of southern Morocco, which has become vulnerable as a result of irreversible socio-economic and cultural changes Integrity (2009) All the structures comprising the ksar are located within the boundaries of the property and the buffer zone protects its environment. The earthen buildings are very vulnerable due to lack of maintenance and regular repair resulting from the abandonment of the ksar by its inhabitants. The CERKAS (Centre for the conservation and rehabilitation of the architectural heritage of atlas and sub-atlas zones) monitors, with difficulty, respect for the visual integrity of the property. Authenticity (2009) In comparison to other ksour of the region, the Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou has preserved its architectural authenticity with regard to configuration and materials. The architectural style is well preserved and the earthen constructions are perfectly adapted to the climatic conditions and are in harmony with the natural and social environment. The large houses in the lower part of the village, with well conserved decorative motifs, are regularly maintained. The construction materials used still remain earth and wood. The inclination to introduce cement has so far been unsuccessful, thanks to the continued monitoring of the «Comité de contrôle des infractions» (Rural Community, Town Planning Division, Urban Agency, CERKAS). Only a few lintels and reinforced concrete escaped its vigilance, but they have been hidden by earthen rendering. Particular attention is also paid to doors and windows giving on to the lanes, to ensure that the wood is not replaced by metal. Protection and management requirements (2009) Protection measures essentially relate to the different laws for the listing of historic monuments and sites, in particular the Law 22-80 concerning Moroccan heritage. The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou currently has a five-year management plan (2007-2012). This management plan is the result of two years of reflection and workshops involving all the persons and institutions concerned with the future of the site, in particular the local populations. The recommendations of this plan are being implemented. Furthermore, two management committees have been established (a local committee and a national one) in which all the parties are represented and cooperate in decision-making. As well as managing the property, CERKAS ensures coordination in the implementation of this management plan. visit our site for more informations...
Why Do You Have To Wait 10 Days Between Driving Tests?
A practical driving test is the last step to get a driving license. But it is also a very difficult and challenging step because, in this step, the examiners observe your skills very carefully, and a small mistake may lead you toward failure. Today I am going to share my practical driving test cancellation experience with you. When I started learning to drive, my father was there to teach me. But due to his office and work, he didn't have enough time to teach me. We get up early in the morning and go to the racing ground. My father gave me the keys and asked me to drive. He always told me the right way to drive, and when I performed something wrong, he taught me like a professional instructor. But due to the office work, he has to go early in the morning, and I have very less time to learn new things. After some time, my father asked me to submit the request to get the driving test license. I don't have any idea or previous experience to do that, so I asked my father for help. We go to a net cafe and opened the Dvsa website with the help of the internet. There are many forums, and we have to fill all of them. They asked to give the basic personal information like; provisional number, name, father's name, address, etc. After giving all these things, they asked to give the bank account number to pay the applying fee. After giving the application fee, I received a confirmation mail with the mentioned date of my driving test. My Experience Of Driving Test: First, I have to go for the theory test, and I passed the test with a good score. There are many problems, and hard questions are there, but I solve all of them and pass my theory driving test. This builds my confidence, and unfortunately, my confidence turns into overconfidence very soon. After passing the theory driving test, I started thinking that the practical driving test will also be very easy, and I don't need to practice more. My father asked me for the practice, but I refused them all the time by saying, "it is very easy for me to pass the practical driving test without practising". and after some days, the date of my practical test arrives, and I come to my center with full aggression and overconfidence. My examiner took a look at me and then sat with me in the car. I performed very well but also made some minor but important mistakes that led me toward failure. This is very heartbroken, and then I start looking to find driving test cancellations to perform the practical test again. With the help of a website, "Test Swap," I found the cancellation very soon and then again performed the test after 10 days. Remember, don't be in a rush; if you fail your test, you should have to wait for at least 10 days to clear your mistakes and learn them very well to perform them rightly during your practical test. After 10 days, I performed my test again and passed it very well. My experience with Test Swap: If you also fail the practical driving test, don't panic! Apply for your driving test again and then find driving cancellations to perform it earlier. I suggest you find driving test cancellations by Test Swap because they are very trusty, and I have experience of using the services of Test Swap. I highly recommend everyone who fails their practical driving test to use the great and excellent services of Test Swap to find driving test cancellations.
Thursday Is Donut Day!
To celebrate the incredible progress of my plastic surgery journey, which you can read all about here, I decided to call a couple friends of mine to join me for donuts this morning. WHY? Because LA donuts from random mom and pop shops are the best, and can turn any post-op rhinoplasty into something called bliss! @Butterflyblu knows all about these dreamy eats in and around LA. This time, however, I wanted to venture out to a different donut shop. One that I'd never been too. And this is what happened: Kettle Glazed! Coming from the Valley, take the 101 S. to Vine street and go East, which turns into Franklin. Just passed Argyle. If you hit Gower, you've gone too far! Turn around! I know, parking is hit or miss, but if you have to park further than you like, imagine all the calories you'll be burning, which will make diving into these nuggets of sweet heaven all the more decadent! Their Cronut is A REVELATION OF ALL THAT IS RIGHT AND GOOD. Don't skip this!!!!!!! I think this is my new hotspot for donuts. For realz. If you live in LA, and you've never been here before--VINGLE ME! LET'S GO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Would you ladies care to join me for some donuts here sometime?! :) it's not a date, just a time to chill... @jordanhamilton @kaminisingh @alywoah @TessStevens @ChelseaHeyes @QueenYuki @KyotieWolf @kristenadams @Donnas @stargaze @flymetothemoon @ImUrBestFriend @galinda @Bekka @RaquelArredondo @jazziejazz @rmayra1 @prgurl4u2envy @DemiP @alannasofia @danidee @daniachicago @simplysam12 @TAIJIOTTER
Art Field Trip: Japanese American National Museum's Hello Kitty Exhibit in LA
Yesterday, my friends and I were able to visit the Japanese American National Museum's Hello Kitty retrospective, "Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty", which opened in the LA-based museum last month. Running through April 26, the exhibit celebrates everything Hello Kitty to commemorate her 40th anniversary. From backpacks and notebooks to toasters and even motor oil, the variety of products that have featured Sanrio's most iconic character is seriously staggering. Here, you get to see some of the most impressive of these. You even get to see Hello Kitty outfits and accessories once worn by celebrity Kitty fans ranging from Cameron Diaz to Katy Perry. (You can even get up close and personal with a Lady Gaga performance dress made of nothing but Hello Kitty stuffed toys!) But perhaps my favorite part of the exhibit is a complete art gallery filled with paintings, sculptures, and interactive works all inspired by Hello Kitty. The artists featured represent both American and Japanese artists, and include such popular ones as Audrey Kawasaki, Gary Baseman, D*face, and Yoskay Yamamoto. Check them out in the attached pictures! Photo 1: The 'halfway point' of this two-story exhibit Photo 2: "Hi Kitty", Audrey Kawasaki Photo 3: "Much Loved Kitty", Mark Nixon Photo 4: "Uh Oh Kitty Ho", D*Face Photo 5: "Hello Kitty Kaiju", Mark Nagata Photo 6: "Space Kitty", Yoskay Yamamoto Photo 7: "Melty Kitty Dream", Buff Monster Photo 8: "Hello Kitty in Bloom", Michael Courville Photo 9: "Play Date", Gary Baseman Photo 10: "Hello Lincoln", Scott Scheidly
World’s most beautiful clock towers
A welcoming view in San Francisco San Francisco’s Ferry Building, a Beaux-Arts building with a 245ft-tall tower, was the city’s primary point for arrivals and departures between 1898 and the late 1930s, when the Golden Gate and Bay bridges were built. Inside, a 660ft-long skylit atrium that once provided access to ferries now houses shops and restaurants, including Blue Bottle Coffee and the Asian restaurant Slanted Door. It is especially crowded on Saturday mornings when a farmers’ market takes over the space in front and in the rear of the building, overlooking the bay. (Julie Clarke-Bush) Colombia's grand gateway From a mosque-like tower in Malaysia to one of London’s most iconic structures, these five landmarks were designed to stand the test of time. In Colombia, the four-sided Torre del Reloj gate grants access to the most charming part of Cartagena – a walled section of 18th-century mansions, leafy squares and street cafes. The tower and clock were added in 1888; in the foreground, a statue of city founder Pedro de Heredia keeps watch. (Guillermo Vasquez/Flickr) Prague’s macabre mainstay Clockmaker Hanuš, who perfected Prague’s Old Town Hall Tower in 1490, was supposedly blinded so that he wouldn’t make a more beautiful version elsewhere. As the perfect revenge, Hanuš stopped the clock from functioning, and it was 100 years before someone would figure out how to repair it. The clock is known for its 12 marching apostles; a skeleton on the right, depicting Death, starts the show by pulling on a string and looking at his other hand, in which he holds an hourglass. Then, two windows open, allowing the apostles to make their moves. A magnificent late-Gothic door in the adjacent house serves as the main entrance to the Old Town Hall. (Reed Kaestner/Corbis) Moorish notes in Malaysia Completed in 1897 by the British colonial administration, the Sultan Abdul Samad Building anchors Kuala Lumpur’s Merdeka Square. Its Moorish style can be attributed to the mosques that architect AC Norman observed while in India. The Union Jack flag was replaced by the Malaysian flag on 31 August 1957, and many national events have taken place here since. (Boris Henriot) A storied sight in London “Big Ben” was originally a nickname used for the gargantuan bell inside the London clock tower. These days, the moniker refers to the bell, the clock face and the 315ft tower too – though the beloved icon was officially renamed the Elizabeth Tower in 2012, as part of Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee celebration. Built from the inside out, the stone and granite tower got its finishing touch with the clock tower’s installation in 1859. The cast-iron minute hands proved too heavy, so they were replaced with today’s lighted copper hands. (Paul Hardy/Corbis)