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This dish looks so freaking good!
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American Foods That Canada Does Actually Better!!
I lived in Canada and in the U.S - No offense - but I feel like Canadian foods are better at some point :) I still miss Timhortons so bad!!! Coffee tasted great, Timbits and Iced Caps were just great in everyway. (1) Fries with Poutine Canadians take plain french fries to a whole new level by adding cheese and gravy to them. I used to eat this almost everyday in the back old days~ (2) Beer Okay, beer may be a drink, but it is definitely something Canadians do better than Americans. In Canada, the average “normal” beer has a higher alcohol contentthan American beer, with a range of 4.0 percent to 6.1 percent alcohol by volume (ABV) as compared to America’s 4.1 percent to 5.9 percent ABV. (Oh come on it's better than Coors for sure) (3) Chips Forget salt and vinegar, barbecue, and sour cream and onion potato chips. Canada has thebest flavorsthat you cannot buy in the US. Try Lay’s Ketchup chips, Ruffles All Dressed chips, Lays Dill Pickle chips and Hickory Sticks. And yes, we even havepoutine-flavored chips. I still miss the ketchup one <3 (4) Coffee I know America runs on Dunkin’, but that’s only because you guys do not have Tim Hortons (in most states). Tim Hortons’ coffee isfar superiorto that of Dunkin’ Donuts and if you haven’t heard of a “double double,” you sure are missing out. Try Ice Caps - I remember it was under $2 and tasted so much better than Starbucks coffee frap (which is like $3-4). (5) Milk You might be confused by this one. How can milk be better in Canada? Two words:bagged milk. Stop that face you’re making right now and understand just how amazing bagged milk is. Not only does ittaste better out of a bag, but it also is much more fun to pour, not to mention cheaper. It's cheap and tasty. You can use the milk one at a time - put the bagged milk in the plastic jar and once it's done, just thow away the garbage~ VOILA!! Click LIKE <3 if you agree!!!!
World’s most beautiful clock towers
A welcoming view in San Francisco San Francisco’s Ferry Building, a Beaux-Arts building with a 245ft-tall tower, was the city’s primary point for arrivals and departures between 1898 and the late 1930s, when the Golden Gate and Bay bridges were built. Inside, a 660ft-long skylit atrium that once provided access to ferries now houses shops and restaurants, including Blue Bottle Coffee and the Asian restaurant Slanted Door. It is especially crowded on Saturday mornings when a farmers’ market takes over the space in front and in the rear of the building, overlooking the bay. (Julie Clarke-Bush) Colombia's grand gateway From a mosque-like tower in Malaysia to one of London’s most iconic structures, these five landmarks were designed to stand the test of time. In Colombia, the four-sided Torre del Reloj gate grants access to the most charming part of Cartagena – a walled section of 18th-century mansions, leafy squares and street cafes. The tower and clock were added in 1888; in the foreground, a statue of city founder Pedro de Heredia keeps watch. (Guillermo Vasquez/Flickr) Prague’s macabre mainstay Clockmaker Hanuš, who perfected Prague’s Old Town Hall Tower in 1490, was supposedly blinded so that he wouldn’t make a more beautiful version elsewhere. As the perfect revenge, Hanuš stopped the clock from functioning, and it was 100 years before someone would figure out how to repair it. The clock is known for its 12 marching apostles; a skeleton on the right, depicting Death, starts the show by pulling on a string and looking at his other hand, in which he holds an hourglass. Then, two windows open, allowing the apostles to make their moves. A magnificent late-Gothic door in the adjacent house serves as the main entrance to the Old Town Hall. (Reed Kaestner/Corbis) Moorish notes in Malaysia Completed in 1897 by the British colonial administration, the Sultan Abdul Samad Building anchors Kuala Lumpur’s Merdeka Square. Its Moorish style can be attributed to the mosques that architect AC Norman observed while in India. The Union Jack flag was replaced by the Malaysian flag on 31 August 1957, and many national events have taken place here since. (Boris Henriot) A storied sight in London “Big Ben” was originally a nickname used for the gargantuan bell inside the London clock tower. These days, the moniker refers to the bell, the clock face and the 315ft tower too – though the beloved icon was officially renamed the Elizabeth Tower in 2012, as part of Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee celebration. Built from the inside out, the stone and granite tower got its finishing touch with the clock tower’s installation in 1859. The cast-iron minute hands proved too heavy, so they were replaced with today’s lighted copper hands. (Paul Hardy/Corbis)
How To Make Mee Goreng Mamak (印度炒面), Fried Noodles with Indo-Malayan Flair
I love Indonesian food. Based on their history and interactions with the rest of Asia, the cuisine has subtle nods to Chinese, Thai, and Indian dishes, but with their own special (and usually nice and spicy) twist. Mee goreng is perhaps my favorite of the Indo-Malayan dishes. From the picture, it looks like a standard chow mein-esque stir fry, but the flavor involved is absolutely incredible and definitely sets it apart from its 'noodle cousins'. (Especially when you top it with fried onion pieces and just the right amount of sesame oil.) Mee goreng is such a popular dish that you can buy instant packages of it all over Asia. In fact, I have some friends who lived in Western Africa that enjoyed instant mee goreng as a steady staple through the week. (You can buy instant mee goreng at a majority of Asian supermarkets in America, but try this recipe for the real deal and super authentic stuff!) ------------------------------------------------------ Mee Goreng Mamak (Fried Noodles) 500 grams of yellow noodles Handfuls of beansprouts depend on liking 2 small tomatoes, quartered 2 small onions, chopped Handful of chicken breast meat, thinly sliced, or minced beef 2 eggs, lightly beaten 1 potato, boiled and cut into cubes 1 small size dry bean curd, cut into small pieces 3 tablespoons of cooking oil (I usually use soybean.) 1 tablespoons of minced green onion and garlic 2 fish cakes, sliced (optional) Handful of shrimp, de-shelled and de-veined, optional 1 green chili or Thai chili or red cut chili, optional 3 tablespoons of ketchup 3 tablespoons of chili sauce or chili paste 1 tablespoon of dark soy sauce 1 tablespoon of light soy sauce 1 teaspoon of garam masala/curry/turmeric powder, optional (but highly recommended!) For garnishing (optional): Some cucumber slices Some fresh coriander leaves or green onion Some lime or Calamansi lime (cut into half) Some deep fried shallots Some grounded peanut + sugar mixture Sesame oil 1. Assemble all the ingredients that need to chopped or sliced. In a big frying pan, sauté the onion and minced garlic until fragrant. Add in turmeric or Garam Masala (if preferred). Add the chicken breast/minced beef, stir fry for 1-2 minutes. Add the dry bean curd, fish cakes and potato cubes. 2. Add in the yellow noodles and stir fry until well mixed. If the yellow noodles is too dry, add about 1/4 cup of water. Add the tomatoes, prawns, tomato ketchup, chili sauce or paste, freshly cut green/red chili (if any). Stir fry until well combined (about 2-3 minutes). 3. Add in the beaten egg, sugar and salt to taste, followed by the beans sprout. Stir fry until the beaten eggs dries up. Off the heat and transfer to the serving plate. Top with sesame oil to taste.
These Street Vendors Engage In A Battle Of The Bods.
So a few months ago, I wrote a card about the McDonald's Goddess, a Taiwanese fast food cashier that took the Internet by storm for her good looks and adorable sing-songy voice. Today, it was brought to my attention that there's options out there for the ladies too - in the form of hunky street vendors. Ladies, meet the guys serving up your streetside groceries with a little extra eye candy. (Warning: There's no way to write this without sounding like an issue of TeenBeat magazine. Gentlemen, please divert your eyes.) So the trend hit the Internet all thanks to Chen Yi-Tin, a Taiwanese part-time model turned street vendor that had his picture shared by women in Taipei after spotting him selling bean curd in a local market. Since blowing up the Chinese blogging site Weibo last summer, Yi-Tin's career's been on serious lock, grabbing him plenty of Instagram followers and campaigns modeling anything from fitness clothes to underwear. (GET ITTTT.) Not to be outdone, Malaysia soon called everyone's attention to their own male-model-slash-vendor Jordan Yeoh, who saw what Yi-Tin was going in Taiwan and thought, "Hey, why not go help my aunt and uncle with their durian stand?" And then, boom. Overnight Internet celebrity and fitness guru. Asia's social media game doesn't mess around. If you don't know what it is, durian is a fruit that smells a whole lot like used diapers. So I guess if your durian shake can still bring the ladies to the yard even though you smell kind of like where Chiquita Banana would go to die, you must be really, really, ridiculously good-looking. The vendor dude 'arms race' (pun intended) continued with Wang Xiang Hong, another Taipei native who's been pulling in droves of female consumers. As a busy college student, Xiang Hong never modeled professionally and was simply helping out a friend whose fruit stand was understaffed for a few months. However, Xiang Hong did get to enjoy a brief modeling career before enlisting in the military shortly after. Lastly, there's a Taiwanese cake shop employee simply known as "Cake Boy". (It sounds better in Taiwanese, I'm sure. Trust.) He first caught local attention after picking up part-time work at a streetside cake shop while attending college for sports, his specialty being volleyball. He began to go viral on Weibo after women visiting the shop noted his good looks pose something of a striking resemblance to various Korean pop stars popular in the region. (I know we've got some K-Pop fans here on Vingle. Do you ladies agree?) So what do you guys think of the hunky street vendor trend? Is it shameful vanity or smart business?
How to reduce your food waste in 7 days (and save money!)
Day 1 Store your ingredients in the proper place to extend the shelf life and preserve quality. Keep root vegetables and onions in a cool, dark place. Leafy green vegetables, apples and grapes in the fridge between 1c-4c. Bread will become dry if stored in the fridge, however, if you plan on using it just for toast, it will certainly extend its life. Opened jars are best kept in the fridge. Day 2 Before you start cooking, consider the amount of ingredients you really need to use. An average portion size for uncooked rice is between 80-90g per person, and 80-100g dried pasta per person. Cooking a larger amount than needed of these basic ingredients can be costly and wasteful. If you intentionally cook more than needed so you can save some for another time, make sure you plan when you are going to use it- and stick to it! Day 3 Treat "best before" dates on food labelling as guidelines and not rules. Imagine that your food doesn’t have packaging or a use-by date. Use your senses to determine if it is edible and of course, use your common sense. If a vegetable appears a little limp, it can be chopped up and used in a cooked dish, but if there is visible mould or an odour, it shouldn’t be eaten for the purpose of food safety. Day 4 Have a selection of food storage containers and labels on hand for storing leftovers. This will maximise the space in your fridge / freezer and allow you to recognise what is in each container. Keep leftovers of sauces in glass jars in the fridge, again to make it easy to recognise and locate, and keep them fresher for longer.  Day 5 Rotate the items around in your fridge, freezer and cupboards to ensure that everything gets used before it passes its best quality and taste. This also reminds you of what you have available before you go shopping, so you can create meals around these products.  Day 6 Make an informal list of the food you throw away, so you can recognise any patterns. Throwing away half a loaf of bread? Think about how better to store it and use it up. Throwing away that leftover pasta sauce you made last week? Remember to add leftovers to your meal plan. Throwing away an unopened bag of spinach? Base your shopping list around what you’re actually going to cook that week. Day 7 Get creative with your leftover ingredients and cooked foods. Reducing waste and saving money on food bills doesn’t have to be a struggle, there is a world of new recipes and meals available when you think outside of the box - just have fun with it. 
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