danidee
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Make A Fist. Then Read This Card.

So I just learned about something cool today called Kobushi Shindan. Have any of you heard about it?

Kobushi Shindan (literally, 'fist analysis' in Japanese) is an ancient samurai personality test. All you need to do to take it is make a fist!

So make a fist, any fist, and find out what your personal fist form says about you!

Fist #1: Your thumb rests on your index finger.

People with this fist shape tend to be natural leaders. You like helping others and, likewise, appreciate being leaned on for support. However, despite a strong exterior, you have the tendency to be a bit insecure. In relationships, you are extremely devoted and expect that same kind of loyalty in return. You put others before yourself, and since you're not necessarily good at words, you put that love into compassionate action.

Fist #2: Your thumb rests in the middle of your fist.

You're a free-spirit with a wide range of talents and plenty of friends. However, you tend to be afraid to try new things because you fear failure. And despite the fact you have a wide group of friends, the amount of friends you consider close is considerably smaller. In love, that fear of failure makes it hard for you to begin romantic relationships, but because of your kind and sociable nature, you're a pretty attractable potential mate!

Fist #3: You tuck your thumb underneath fingers.

You're much more introverted than the other two personality types. You're a sensitive and private person, and while you don't have a huge social network, the few friends you do have are extremely close and loyal to you. You hate conflict and tend to internalize your feelings, but your compromising nature makes you very attentive in your romantic relationships, which tends to make them pretty long-term.

So which fist did you guys get? Do you think Kobushi Shindan has got you all figured out, or are there some things you disagree with?

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#2
I got Fist #2. But I don't agree with bc I don't have a wide group of friends and I'm not afraid to try new things, bc I know if I fail, I can try again.
#2
#2
I'm fist 1 heheh yay
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