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Want to Get Fit? Here Are the Most Expensive and the Cheapest Sources of Protein
Getting fit is a common goal for many people, but achieving it often proves to be quite hard. Although regular exercise, calorie deficits and eating a lot of protein are three of the most important rules to get fit, sticking to a strict diet and exercise regimen can test one's willpower very much. Further, since high-quality gyms can sometimes cost a couple of thousand rupees or more per month, a fitness plan can be fairly expensive. Saving on a gym membership could be straightforward, as one can simply choose to work out at home, outside or switch to budget-friendly facilities, which can cost under Rs. 1,000 per month. Regarding protein consumption, many online articles only highlight foods which have "high levels of protein" irrespective of their cost. So, to help people find the most financially-friendly sources of protein, we analysed the most popular ones in terms of their cost per 100 grams of protein. Meat, Fish, Yogurt and Certain Cheeses Are Expensive As one would expect, certain sources of protein are significantly more expensive than others. As an example, greek yogurt has gotten quite popular recently as a healthy food. In fact, it's a good source of protein, calcium and probiotics. It also helps one feel full for a relatively small amount of calories. But, it's actually a fairly expensive source of protein, costing more than Rs. 500 per 100 grams of protein. For instance, a 90g container of low-fat Epigamia Greek Yogurt costs Rs. 40 on BigBasket. This product contains approximately 7.4 grams of protein, netting an effective cost of Rs. 541 per 100 grams of protein. Above all, we found swiss cheese to be incredibly expensive for the protein one gets out of it. Steak and fish are very expensive too. These tend to be higher in fat and calories, so they may be better to avoid if one is also dieting. Not All Seeds and Grains Are Made Equal Seeds and grains such as almonds or quinoa are often a part of suggested diet food lists. However, such foods tend to vary dramatically in price. We found hemp seeds and almonds cost around Rs. 500 - 700 per 100 grams of protein, while chickpeas and oats cost under Rs. 200 for the same amount of this muscle-building nutrient. If one wants to maximise the amount of protein while minimising cost, pick specific nuts with care and go for something like sunflower seeds rather than almonds. Surprising Winners Most of the winners on this list are pretty obvious: tofu, chicken breast and eggs have commonly been known to be some of the most popular effective protein sources that also help you feel full. So, it's not a surprise that they are some of the cheaper options. One of the items on the winner list was somewhat surprising: peanut butter. It only costs Rs. 167 for 100 grams of protein. However, peanut butter is relatively high in fat and sugar, so it shouldn't be heavily relied on for building lean muscle mass and reducing belly fat. Staying Healthy Physically & Financially If one wants to get into better physical shape, it requires a deliberate commitment to change one's lifestyle, increasing the frequency and intensity of one's workouts while also strictly regimenting one's diet. Just pumping out sets at the gym won't provide the desired results if one isn't following a well-structured exercise routine and using proper form. It's also important to control one's diet properly so that one consumes a wide variety of nutrients. Worrying solely about protein and calories can be counterproductive and cause ailments. Focusing on certain financial aspects related to getting into better physical shape will make the whole process easier on one's bank account. For example, as we have done here, researching the most cost-effective sources of protein can help one efficiently build muscles while also helping one save money. There are several other aspects related to one's health that could potentially result in cost savings, too. For instance, one could use a rewards credit card to pay for gym memberships or groceries, which could offset the total economic cost. Further, it's possible one may be overpaying for health insurance if one simply took the advice of a salesperson without researching other viable options. Properly researching different endeavours in life will help one focus on what is most important and effective, while weeding out sources of inefficiencies that impede reaching your goals. This article originally appeared on ValueChampion’s blog
Spring Vegetable Pad Thai
My roommate headed off to Thailand last week leaving me with nothing to do but to stare at her Instagram updates of all the fun and food she is having over there. As a result, all I have been craving for the past few days is Pad Thai. Normally I go the Panang Curry route, but I feel like returning to the basics. I saw this recipe and felt like my food prayers were answered. This looks like summer in a bowl! "Ingredients: 14 ounces pad thai rice noodles, or rice noodles of choice 1 yellow bell pepper, thinly sliced 1 carrot, shredded 3 cups red cabbage, thinly sliced 2 cups edamame, shelled 6 spears asparagus, chopped - you'll cook them with the rice noodles and soy beans For the Sauce: 2/3 cup liquid aminos, or soy sauce 1/4 cup sesame oil 2 tablespoons creamy peanut butter 1 teaspoon ginger, peeled and grated (fresh) For Serving: sesame seeds fresh cilantro, chopped soy sauce, to taste Directions 1. Add all ingredients for the sauce to a small blender and blend until smooth. Set aside. 2. Bring a pot of water to a boil and add the rice noodles. 3. Allow the noodles to cook until softened, about 8 to 10 minutes. 4. 6 minutes in to cooking, add the shelled edamame and the chopped asparagus to the hot water in order to cook the vegetables (you want to leave the asparagus al dente and not over-cook it). Note: if you aren’t using Pad Thai rice noodles, follow the instructions on your package of rice noodles 5. Strain the vegetables and noodles into a colander and immediately place in a large serving bowl. 6. Add the remaining vegetables, pour the sauce over everything and toss together. 7. Add salt and soy sauce to taste."
Thai Cauliflower and Sweet Potato Flautas with Spicy Peanut Sauce
In pursuit of the perfect sweet potato flautas recipe for dinner tonight, I found this little game-changer. Not only are these sweet potato flautas amped up in nutrition with the inclusion of cauliflower, but Thai-style Mexican food? This is about to attack like, five different cravings in one. Word. ------------------------------------------------------------- Thai Cauliflower and Sweet Potato Flautas Peanut Sauce: 1 cup peanuts 1 cup water 1 tsp brown sugar 1 tsp toasted sesame oil 2 Tbsp soy sauce 1 Tbsp lime juice 1 small red Asian chili Flautas: 2 tsp toasted sesame oil 1 stalk lemongrass, beaten and finely chopped 1 medium head cauliflower, finely chopped ½ yellow onion, diced 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 small red Asian chili, minced ½ sweet potato, grated ½ cup Thai basil ¼ cup cilantro, chopped salt & pepper cooking oil for frying 8 small tortillas (corn or flour) 1. First, make the sauce. Combine all the sauce ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. IF you have time, add another half or full cup of water and bring to a simmer in a saucepan as you prepare the flautas. If not, no worries! You can also just use peanut butter, instead of peanuts, if that's what you have on hand. 2. In a frying pan over medium heat, add the sesame oil and lemongrass. Let cook for a minute or two before adding the cauliflower. Cook for another minute (assuming the cauliflower is very finely chopped, if not — cook it longer! It needs to be softening before you proceed) before adding the onion, garlic, and Asian chili. 3. Cook for one minute before adding the grated sweet potato and half of the Thai basil. Cook for another two minutes before removing from the heat and adding the remaining basil, cilantro, and salt & pepper to taste. 4. In a clean, heavy frying pan, heat ½" of cooking oil over medium heat. Let it heat for at least 3-4 minutes before proceeding. Roll about ⅓ cup of filling in each tortilla to make eight flautas. 5. When the oil is hot, work in batches placing each flauta seam-side-down in the oil. Cook until each side is golden-brown, rolling over to get all sides. 6. Top with extra basil, cilantro, peanuts, and lime. Serve with peanut sauce.
Meatless Monday Recipe: Quick & Easy Pad Thai Spring Rolls
Making pad thai at home is deceptively easy, but making spring rolls is ridiculously fun! Combine both, and you have the pad thai tofu spring rolls below - a quick and creative meal you'll definitely find yourself making more than once. You should be able to find spring roll paper, tamarind, and chili garlic sauce in the ethnic food aisle of your local supermarket and most Asian grocers. 10-Ingredient Pad Thai Spring Rolls (Adapted From Minimalist Baker) MAKES 8 ROLLS INGREDIENTS: For The Spring Rolls - 14 ounces extra firm tofu 8 ounces white or brown rice noodles 8 - 10 white or brown rice spring roll papers 2 cups thinly sliced carrots 1 large handful fresh cilantro For The Sauce - 3 tablespoons tamarind concentrate 3 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce + more for tofu 3 - 4 tablespoons coconut sugar, agave, or maple syrup 1/2 lime, juiced 1 - 2 teaspoons chili garlic sauce + more for tofu For Serving (Optional) - Peanut sauce (Check out my Vegan DIY: Thai Peanut Sauce recipe card.) Sriracha Directions: 1) Preheat oven to 400 degrees F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Wrap tofu in a clean towel. Set something heavy on top - such as a cast iron pan - to press out liquid for 15 minutes. Then cut into 1/2-inch wide rectangular strips. 2) Arrange tofu on the baking sheet, giving each piece some space so it can firm up. Bake for 28 - 30 minutes to dry and firm the tofu. For softer tofu, bake for 20 minutes. For firmer, bake for 30 - 35 minutes. Set aside. In the meantime, prep carrots, cilantro, and cook rice noodles according to package instructions, then drain and set aside. 3) To make the sauce, add tamarind, tamari, coconut sugar, lime and chili garlic sauce to a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Once it begins bubbling, lower heat to low and cook for 3 - 4 minutes, stirring frequently.Taste and adjust seasonings as needed, adding more tamari or soy sauce for saltiness, chili garlic for heat, coconut sugar, agave, or maple syrup for sweetness, or lime for acidity. Remove from heat and set aside. 4) Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Once hot, add baked tofu and 1 teaspoon each chili garlic sauce and tamari or soy sauce, plus 1 tablespoon of the Pad Thai sauce. Sauté, stirring frequently, for 1 - 2 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. 5) Add cooked noodles to the still-hot pan over medium heat and add remaining Pad Thai sauce. Use tongs to disperse sauce and toss noodles. Cook for 1 - 2 minutes, then remove from heat and set aside. 6) Assemble a station for preparing the spring rolls with a shallow bowl or plate (for dunking the rice paper), bring a kettle or pot of water to a boil (to cook the rice paper with), and a clean work surface (such as a large cutting board). Gather all ingredients and add hot water to the shallow bowl or pan. Let it cool for 1-2 minutes, then add 1 rice paper at a time and cook/soften for 45 seconds to 1 minute. Lift and let excess water drip off, then transfer to your clean work surface. 7) Top with pad thai noodles, tofu, carrots and cilantro, then roll over once, tuck in sides, and continue rolling all the way up. Place seam-side down on a serving plate or baking sheet and cover with a damp, room temperature towel to keep fresh. Continue until all spring rolls are prepared - about 8. 8) Serve as is with a bit more chili garlic sauce or sriracha! Another great addition is the aforementioned peanut sauce posted above. Best when fresh, though leftovers keep covered in the refrigerator for 2-3 days.
Wine- History and Preparation
Natural wine is ancient, and therefore the latest trend. What makes a wine “natural”? When Jenny Lefcourt captive to Paris within the Nineteen to check French literature and cinema, she and her friends started drinking a very exciting style of wine. This wine tasted “totally different, and alive, and delicious,” she remembers. They found it in an exceedingly few bars, and later stumbled into a tasting of it hosted at a vicinity edifice. Now natural wine has become a word form of bourgeois style in sure social circles and on sure menus across the world. It’s become a supply of indie social capital, with wine labels that are as feverishly followed and obsessed over as album covers within the ’80s. However what makes a wine “natural” isn’t forever clear to customers who are additional accustomed to the under-$10 section at merchant. And it became the topic of heated dialogue within the wine world, with natural wine purists declaring it in virtue and thrilling style, and traditionalists criticizing the perceived flaws and even its idealism. But whereas natural wine is recently fashionable, it's not new: folks are creating hard fruit crush while not additives for thousands of years. (The history of sulfites complicates this; some folks believe that sulfites in one type or another were accustomed preserve wine as early because the eighth century before Christ.) “People assume that natural wine may be a cult or a replacement issue, however it’s the standard thanks to build wine,” explains Krista Scruggs, a wine maker and farmer based mostly in American state and Texas. “It’s typical wine that’s truly new.” Here’s what natural wine is, however we have a tendency to captive off from — and back to — it, and wherever it’s heading next. What it is Natural wine is additional of an inspiration than a well-defined class with agreed-upon characteristics. In its purest type, wine made of pure hard fruit crush “PEOPLE assume THAT NATURAL WINE may be a cult OR a replacement issue, however it’s the standard thanks to yarra valley restaurants. They serve typical WINE that’s truly new. Many people — winemakers, distributors, writers, — disagree with the term “natural wine.” Some like the phrase “low-intervention” wine, or “naked” wine, or “raw” wine. Scruggs calls her product “just fucking hard juice.” however “natural wine” is that the term that's most generally used, and anyone at a natural-inclined wine store, wine bar, or edifice can understand what you mean once you use it. For the aim of this text, I’m operating beneath the idea that natural wine isn’t a fraud, nor is its supporter’s neurotic, however rather that it’s an extremely debated and endlessly difficult topic that ne'er ceases to urge all manner of individuals irritated up. Also, the things are extremely usually delicious. Understanding natural wine needs a basic understanding of the trade method. Within the simplest terms, that method has 2 parts: growing and selecting grapes, and so turning them into wine through fermentation. Natural wine, then, is formed from grapes not sprayed with pesticides or herbicides. Natural winemakers handpick their grapes rather than hoping on machines to reap them. Once it involves turning those handpicked grapes into juice, natural winemakers have faith in native yeast, the things that’s whizzing around within the air and can land on grapes if you set them in an exceedingly vat for long enough, to line off natural fermentation. And in contrast to most typical winemakers, they don’t use any additives (like pretend oak flavor, pretend vanilla flavor, sugar, acid, egg white, etc.) within the trade method. Occasionally, some natural winemakers can add some sulfites, a preservative and stabilizer that winemakers are victimization longer than the other additive. Sulfites make sure that the wine you drink tastes roughly identical because it did once it went into the bottle. Natural winemakers either use no supplementary sulfites or use it in little quantities, whereas typical winemakers dissipate to ten times the maximum amount. They conjointly use it differently: typical winemakers add sulfites to grapes to exterminate natural yeasts, and so add additional throughout the remainder of the trade process; natural winemakers can add a bit simply before bottling. The purest of the pure — naturally hard fruit crush with no sulfites. So, from the above blog we can guess that you have some ideas about the ancient history and preparation of wines.
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