danidee
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How To Be Annoying: An Illustrated Guide

So you think you're annoying. Or maybe you don't think you're annoying at all. Either way, your annoying could probably use some work. In all aspects of life, there is always room for improvement - your personal quotient of annoyingness included.
Fortunately for you, creative studio Last Lemon surveyed people to find out exactly what things annoy them and compiled this adorably illustrated list of some of the top answers. So if you're looking to up your obnoxious game up, check out some of my favorite from the site below!

Be that friend always texting or scrolling through Facebook.

NEVER ENOUGH EXCLAMATION MARKS!!!!

A wittle annoying, don't you think?

Extra points if they're working on a project or taking an exam.

Because no one is more annoying than the smartass.

If you do this to me, you are asking for quick and certain death.

Second place in the annoying race? Cracking your knuckles.

So basically, every barista you've ever met at a Starbucks.

My evil cousins used to do this to me for fun when I was a kid.

And if you're doing it all on a hands-free device? Even better.

So which of these is the most annoying to you? What other things annoy you?

Let me know in the comments below!

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HAHAHA i loved this!! do you make those memes yourself?
I have a guy at work who doesn't do anything and gets paid more than me so I don't like my boss
oh yeah git to do some if these
I hate when people ask me to repeat myself when I'm talking to them. Like, just listen. That's all you gotta do. lol
Tbh I do some of these annoying things. But the fiddling with your phone is annoying, the being literal, and messing with my hair is annoying. What also annoys me is when people,other than the ones I give permission to, touch me, send each sentence you want to say over txt message individually, and people who have no power over me try to boss me around.
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