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Travel Singapore: 6 Dishes You Have to Try!

I just got back from Singapore which was basically just me eating everything in sight for 4 days straight.

Here are 6 things I had a loved, but keep in mind there are a billion other things you have to try there as well! (Not listed: chili craaaaaaaaaaab!!!!!!)
Pictured above: Teh O Limau (black tea with lime!)

1. Murtabak

Murtabak is a super tasty dish from the Middle East that I could probably eat every day. You can get nearly any filling you want (we chose one Chicken and one sardine) and it will be wrapped up in a delicious bread similar to na'an or paratha.
We got curry to dip it in and it tasted fantastic!

2. Fish Ball Soup

For the unadventurous or those who avoid spice, this fish ball soup is perfect. If you find that traveling gave you an upset stomach, this simple broth with some onion, noodles, and a few balls made from fish will have you feeling better in no time. Serious comfort food.

3. Carrot Cake

Carrot cake is my favorite thing on this earth. Rather than carrots, it is made using radish that has been pounded into a soft almost noodle. Think gnocchi, but with radish! It's then fried up with egg and chilis, then (if you get black carrot cake) tossed around in some soy sauce.
It's DELICIOUS.

4. BBQ Sting Ray

The dish to the left is bbq string ray, the first thing I ever ate in Singapore. Its a fishy taste covered in a really awesome chili sauce.
Once I got the fact that it was sting ray out of my mind, it tasted just like any other fish I love eating!

5. Popiah

See that egg roll looking thing? That's popiah.
At first I expected something like the Filipino dish lumpia, but it is so much sweeter than that. These spring rolls are common in Singapore, Taiwan, and Malaysia and are filled with fresh veggies. You can get them spicier, but they'll always have a distinctly sweet taste to it.

6. Kaya Toast (with Teh O)

Made from a mixture of coconut and egg (which I just found out last week, after years of eating kaya...) Kaya jam is one of the yummiest things you can spread on toast.
Traditional kaya toast has kaya and a few thick slices of butter sandwiched between two freshly toasted slices of bread. Usually its also served with soft boiled eggs which you can add soy sauce to.
Get your kaya toast with some kopi or teh o (black coffee or black tea) to start your day right!
I also tried Salted Egg Yolk Croissant, since salted egg yolk ANYTHING is a huge deal in Singapore right now.

And to be honest, I really didn't like it.

It tasted like what happens when you make icing and add too much powdered sugar. It was really dry and didn't even taste like salt or egg at all. Maybe it's not supposed to and I'm missing the point, but I wasn't a fan :/

Have you ever had Singaporean food? What's your favorite?!

19 Comments
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Guuuuuuuuuurl, now I'm hungry. And right now I don't have any kind of money right now to leave the country but when I do, a lot of food will be involved in this adventure
These look amazing!!!!
i've only had fish ball soup, but more like i made shabu shabu w those ingredients rather than having a singaporean version of it. but ahhh, dying to go to asia!! idc about the sights, i just want to eat everywhere :3
Ohmygosh...I just want to travel the world to see new sights and try new foods! I'd walk a couple hundred miles to try a dish I've never tasted before! This looks delicious!
great dushes
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