rmayra1
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Easy thing to do!

Dreamcatchers originated with the Ojibwe people, who wove these magical webs from willow hoops and sinew. The hoop represents the travel of giizis, the sun, through the sky. At night, the hole in the center only lets bawedjige, good dreams, pass. Bawedjigewin, bad dreams, are trapped in the web, and dispelled at the first light of morning.
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Graphic Design Tip: How to Brainstorm an Effective Logo
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