nshen1
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Game Over for Zynga?

Former king of web-based gaming really missed the boat when everyone switched over to mobile..tsk tsk.
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How the mighty have fallen.
@garrusvakarian so much truth in what you have said. I really never underestood Farmville
I can't say I'm really broken up about this. They never created a single game I was even slightly interested in (I did play Draw Something for a little while, but they bought that one). I never understood the obsession with games like Farmville.
Was there ever a good game from Zynga?
I really want to see the numbers and rationale that went into determining how Draw Something was deemed to have a value of $180 million....
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