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Korean Legends: What Is A Gumiho?

A Gumiho (구미호) is a creature that appears in ancient Korean folklore.

Deriving from ancient Chinese myths, a gumiho is a nine-tailed fox that has lived a thousand years. It can freely transform into many things, but most usually into a beautiful woman. They set out to seduce boys, and eat their liver or heart (depending on the legend).

It is similar to the Japanese legend of the kitsune.

However, unlike the kistune which can be good and bad, the gumiho is almost ALWAYS depicted as a bad figure.

Some tales say that if a gumiho doesn't kill or eat humans for a thousand days, it can become human.

On the other hand, it is also said that if a gumiho eats the total amount of 1000 men's livers/hearts in a period of 1000 years, it can become human, otherwise it will be dissolved into bubbles.

You've probably heard about it from the drama, My Girlfriend the Nine Tailed Fox!


I love reading about folklore so I wanted to share this with you all :3

Let me know if you'd like more folklore posts!
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I love the dynamics of the fox legends, they have the most interesting of stories 😊🐾 🐺
Yes I do ! Tag me please .
You forgot about the male version is the guardians of the mountains like in my favorite show, Gu Family Book
I still need to watch that drama, I think this folklore is really cool.
Gumiho's are very fascinating to hear about and unique creatures!
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