TheGurpreetKing
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Truth or not

I am amongst that 5% trying to wake you all up. But, one day, either the 1% will drop or will we.
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@TheGurpreetKing i'm not a pessimist myself, and i personally think the percentage of sell-outs is higher😁 but i'm afraid this is the awful truth here........ thank you for bringing it up, and maybe downgrade the percentage of sleeping souls........👍
@nuurussubchiy although maybe the percentages are not accurate, i'm affraid it still is the awfull truth.....
@jULsJ hahaha ok.
look in deeper, you'll find it yourself.
interesting. but what do you know, @TheGurpreetKing ? please don't go "if i tell you, i would have to kill you" on me. 😂😂
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