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Q: Where can I learn Korean for free? (online/offline)

Every province (si, gun, gu) has a multicultural family support center, women's vocation support center, and welfare center from which you can take Korean language courses at no cost.
You can download Korean language worksheets from Kosnet. It comes in many languages for foreigners from various countries to use.
You can find additional on/offline Korean courses from Sogang University's Korean education site
You can also watch the program 'Let's Speak Korean' on the television channel Arirang TV. You can also use the Educational Foundation for Koreans Abroad website.....
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Hi~ I am korean and..i want to say that "thank you "is not 강사합니다 is감사합니다. not 강, 감is right ^0^ I hope you speak korean bettet than before !!
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