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What's Your Favorite "Asian Food?"

Ugh, the other day I overheard someone talking about how much they love Asian food.

Which, like, yeah I love pretty much all food too, but Asia is soooo huge with so many different kinds of food, its really weird to blanket statement it. Like "I like European food" sounds funny, right? Spanish food is SO different from Swedish food. It's just odd.

So, let's try to pick a FAVORITE!

I'm going to give you 6 choices, but you can add your own opinion that isn't on the list :)

Japanese Food

Korean Food

Chinese Food

(and let's not even try to break down Chinese food...It's SO different depending on the region so let's just be really broad haha)

Vietnamese Food

Thai Food

Filipino Food

Leave your vote below~

Again, if your fav isn't on the list, you can add it :)
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Filipino food (my mom is from the Philippines abd she makes awesome Filipino food) and I also like Katsu don
same here
thai lol
Korean and Thai food.
Japanese and Vietnamese😊
Filipino
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