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3 Korean Authors To Add To Your Reading List

I recently made a video about Haruki Murakami, and a few of oyu asked about some Korean authors you might like.


Here are 3 and a half suggestions

First is Kyungsook Shin, who I haven't read yet. She wronte "Please Look After Mom" which was a huge success internationally. She has had some scandals surrounding her though, because she plagarized a bit of her work from other authors...

Now onto the authors I HAVE read!


1. Han Kang

Most recently known for The Vegetarian, she writes in a creepy but realistic style. Everything that happens is believeable which makes it so much scarier. I'm about to read her historical fiction piece, Human Acts!

2. Chang Rae Lee

I read On Such A Full Sea sometime last year and really enjoyed it. It takes place in a distopian society and is a really interesting look into how we interact with people around us!

3. Young Ha Kim

I adore this author and if you're going to read anything on this list make sure you read Black Flower. It is about the true history of hundreds to thousands of Koreans being brought over to Mexico to essentially be slaves on plantations. Its a part of history I never knew about, and Young Ha Kim explains it in a really fascinating way.


Have you read any of these authors?!


Here are links to the books if you're interested in picking any of them up^^

Young Ha Kim
I Have The Right To Destroy Myself: http://amzn.to/2m1fyGG

Han Kang
The Vegetarian: http://amzn.to/2lLKvOn

Chang Rae Lee
On Such A Full Sea: http://amzn.to/2m1jEyQ

Kyung Sook Shin
Please Look After Mom: http://amzn.to/2m1uXqs
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Thank you for posting these!! I've been wanting a new read and now I have 3!! πŸ˜„πŸ˜„πŸ˜„
Enjoy :D
I only know of Haruki Murakami
I've read Please Look After Mom and it was amazingly written. I surely recommend it,you wont regret it.
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