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How To Make Oyakodon (親子丼), Donburi with Chicken and Egg
A 'donburi' - or 'don' for short - in Japanese cuisine is any type of meal that is eaten over a steaming bowl of rice. Among the most internationally popular are katsudon, a rice bowl topped with a fried cutlet and covered in katsu sauce, or gyudon, which is topped with simmered cuts of beef and chopped onion. Perhaps my favorite of all the donburi meals out there, however, is oyakodon, which literally translates to 'parent-and-child' donburi because it uses both the egg and the chicken. (A little gross when you think about it, but whatever. It's delicious.) A warm bowl of oyakodon gives me the same kind of wholesome 'well-being' feeling I would get when I ate a bowl of chicken noodle soup growing up. I blame this either entirely on the chicken and onion itself or the aromatic flavors the donburi is cooked with. In any case, oyakodon is perhaps one of the simplest donburi bowls to make, and I highly suggest you try it out yourself! Pretty much all of the harder to find ingredients (particularly dashi and mirin) should be easy to find in the international section of your local supermarket. ------------------------------------------------------------- Oyakodon, Chicken and Egg Rice Bowl Chicken thigh, skin on (You can use any cut of chicken really, but I prefer using boneless skin-on chicken thigh because of all of its flavor.) 2 eggs 1/2 cup dashi broth (or chicken broth if you have trouble finding dashi near you) 2 teaspoons soy sauce 2 teaspoons honey 2 tablespoon sake (or mirin) a pinch of salt green onions, chopped 1. Place your chicken onto a cold saute pan with some oil, making sure as much meat is making contact with the pan so that cooking will be nice and even. Adjust to medium heat and continue pressing down the meat with a spatula as it cooks to make sure that every bit of the chicken is touching the pan as it goes from cold to hot. It'll make your chicken nice as crispy! 2. As your chicken cooks, mix dashi, soy sauce, honey, and a little bit of salt in a small bowl. In another bowl, throw in two eggs and lightly beat them just enough to break up the yolk. 3. Once the chicken skin is browned, remove from heat and cut the meat into small, bite-size pieces. Don't worry if your chicken isn't cooked thoroughly because it will be put back in the pan later. 4. Drain excess oil in the pan, and put it back on your stove to medium-high with the chicken. Add sake or mirin and cook until the liquid is evaporated. before adding the dashi/soy sauce/honey mixture. Cook until the liquid boils. Add the green onions and egg mixture, and cover until the eggs reach a preferred consistency. 5. Serve over rice, and as an option, garnish with flat-leaf parsley or furikake, a seaweed-based garnish you can find at most Japanese markets. Enjoy!
How To Make Gyeran Bbang (계란빵), A Popular South Korean Egg Muffin
When I first got into Korean cooking, I had never actually eaten at a Korean restaurant. I didn't actually know what most of the dishes I was making were supposed to taste like, but as I live in a town with no real Korean restaurants, I was curious to find out more about the different foods the region had to offer. The nice thing about Korean food is, for the most part, the recipes are simple and easy to follow. The trickiest part about Korean cooking is being able to get all of the ingredients in place, which might require you to locate a nearby Asian grocery store or find a nice place to buy them online. (If that is your situation, I would recommend ordering from H-Mart's official website, one of the larger Korean grocery chains here in the US.) However, gyeran bbang - which translates to 'egg bread' - is a pretty simple Korean food to make without needing to dig that much for ingredients. In fact, you probably already have most if not all the ingredients in your refrigerator right now! Gyeran bbang is a popular street food that is often sold by vendors in South Korea. It was also made recently popular in the Korean television show "The Return of Superman" when actor Jang Hyunsung made them with his two sons. Gyeran bbang is perfect for any time of day, but is especially delicious when served warm for breakfast or on a cold winter day. An oval muffin pan is traditionally used to make the bread's shape, but a standard muffin pan works just as well. I've even seen gyeran bbang in adorable heart shapes! --------------------------------------------- Gyeran Bbang (Egg Bread) 3/4 cup flour 10 eggs 1/2 salted butter, melted 1/3 cup sugar 1/4 cup milk 3/4 teaspoon baking powder Salt, to taste 1. Preheat the oven to 350F. Whisk two eggs in a mixing bowl until they are slightly foamy. Add the sugar and continue whisking until all of it has dissolved. 2. Sift the flour and baking powder into the egg mixture. Add the melted butter and milk and mix well. Place the batter in a ziplock bag. 3. Brush the inside of the muffin pan with melted butter. Cut a 1/4" hole in one corner of the ziplock bag and squeeze 2 - 3 tablespoons worth of batter into each space. It should cover about the first 1/4". Smooth the batter with a spoon, if needed. 4. Carefully break an egg on top of each muffin. Sprinkle each egg with a generous pinch of salt, then cover each egg with the rest of the contents of the ziplock bag. (Make sure each muffin space is only 3/4 of the way full so that each muffin has room to rise.) 5. Bake the muffins for about 24 - 26 minutes or until golden brown. Turn off the oven, but leave the muffins inside for an additional five minutes to continue cooking the egg yolks. Serve warm.
How to incorporate antiques into your home decor
You know what magic is? It is a happy home with exquisite interiors. Wish to design a home with majestic antiques? Incorporating vintage home decorative items in a modern home seems almost unbelievable right? You might have never thought that centuries-old home decorative items would take place in a 21st-century household. Well, let us tell you, antiques are a key to modern interiors. Antiques are growing popular day by day. Many people have antique furniture passed on from generation to generation, making space in the 21st-century world. But, if you look for ideas to help to mix vintage home decorative items in a modern home, it is no cakewalk. If you're looking for the best tips to incorporate antiques into your home decor, we've got your back! So, to unlock the door to a modern home with antiques, scroll right away! ● Group antiques by colour palette The basic aspect of astonishing interiors is following a colour palette. If your home decorative items are chosen keeping in mind the colour palette, it brings a sense of uniformity to your home decor. When it comes to colour blending, going for neutral hues can never go wrong. You can always try & bring life to the neutrals by popping a classy metal wall decor on your walls. If you wish to get your hands at the perfect metal wall decor, our website welcomes you with open hands! Colour popping or resting neutrals, antiques will definitely bring a breeze of grace to the room. ● Layer antiques meet new home decorative items Try to mix and match. What's a more eclectic and intriguing way to incorporate antiques in your home decorative items? Layer multiple styles and mix contemporary and modern home decorative items. An interior design with a chandelier and classic table lamp can be contrasted and layered with a vibrant hand wall painting. The hand wall painting shouldn't be too loud and modern in look. It would not just ruin the vibe of your home decor, but also look like a disaster. So, while selecting a hand wall painting, consider the colours and designs of it so that it flows well with your space. ● Let your antique be the show-stopper Keep all eyes on the antiques now! A bold antique home decorative item always makes a statement. It becomes the focal point in the room. Don't know how to do it? Well, a perfect home decorative item to make a statement would be a chandelier or metal wall decor that stands out in the room. You can also add a vibrant hand wall painting to add life to the walls of your room. To grab some of the most remarkable hand wall paintings, visit our website now! Remember to not go overboard with the interior design. Minimalistic home decorative items make the room aesthetics look more eye-catching. ● Keep them accessible Always remember that antiques also have a functional value along with aspirational value. You must not just keep them out of reach, as a home decorative item, but also as a useful resource. Keep them accessible. Make a place for antiques on your coffee tables, shelves, slabs and walls. Some home decorative items like hand wall paintings and metal wall decor would just add aesthetic vibes to the room. Yet, understand that it's important to add such decorative items too - Masterpieces that turn your room into no less than a dream. ● Mixing antiques of different styles and eras When it comes to antique home decorative items, don't limit yourself to just one style. Experiment, experiment, experiment! You can mix and match an antique wall clock decor with a contemporary hand wall painting. It will add layers to your room aesthetics. Adding on, putting up different sized mirrors, metal wall art and contemporary hand wall paintings would maintain the eclectic vibe of the space. This sort of arrangement of the home decorative items would make your room look as charming as ever. It would convince your guests that smart efforts are put in to make it a dream home! For buying, astounding antique home decorative items, you must gaze through our website. ● Keep it minimal One of the most stupid mistakes people make while decorating their home is overdoing it. You must understand that your home is not a canvas filled with colours and designs & elements. Keep it minimal and classy. A plane wall with classic metal wall art would look stunning as ever. Since antiques are already heavy home decorative items, it's best to stick to the basics like mirrors, metal wall art, hand wall paintings, etc. (You can also find magnificent wall mirrors on our website!) Keep in mind that the less cluttered your interiors are, the more sophisticated they look. ● More lights! It is a tip not just for antique home decor but also a door to breathtaking interiors. Light plays a significant role. You can juggle around with colours and patterns in the lighting of a space. More brightness will highlight the detailings in the antique home decorative items even more. For example, a metal wall art (gold, silver or bronze) would shine bright in the right light, catching everyone's gaze. For putting up a hand wall painting, pretty lights would elevate the essence of the room instantly. Each colour in the hand wall painting would stand out, grabbing everyone's attention. Want to make a home that makes a mark? You can certainly not do it without antique home decorative items. From hand wall paintings and mirrors to metal wall decor & accent tables, each home decorative item in your modern household gives it a unique essence. Hence, when you wish to incorporate antique home decorative items in your home, browse well through the options, compare and then decide. You can get some of the most seamless antiques and modern pieces online (like our own website!). Remember these tips the next time you think of adding some antique decoration to your place to turn it into your dream home! Source url- https://www.dekorcompany.com/blogs/news/how-to-incorporate-antiques-into-your-home-decoration
Antique glass candy containers
Glass candy containers were originally designed as treasure-filled toys or souvenirs; they still attract collectors nearly a century after they were introduced. When asked Jim Olean how he started his collection of glass candy containers, he said in the fall of 1985, I went out into the woods near my house in search of wild mushrooms. Despite my search for mushrooms, I found an old dump. There was a small glass candlestick telephone, a dog, and a Santa without ahead. These items were taken home, washed, and placed on a shelf in our game room. My uncle, who collects many old things, came over to visit me one day. He saw the glass items I showed him. I was told they were made about 30 minutes away, that they held candy, and that they were made of glass. It was a novelty that a toy and candy were all in one!" Since they were found in the dump, all the parts that came with them were gone. If I went to the local antique flea market, then I could find an all-original one, according to my uncle. The next spring, when the flea markets opened, I went to the best one in town. In the same dump, I also discovered a candlestick telephone. But this one was 100% original like the day it was made, some thirty years ago! My $15 purchase went on the shelf with the one I bought from the dump. Even the candy was still intact on the telephone, which was a far cry from the one from the dump. Due to this, I purchased as many as were available. Having made that purchase, I did not realize how far it would go! History of glass candy containers Where and when this industry began is somewhat dubious. There is some proof that glass toy sweets holders were delivered as right on time as the last part of the 1860s. The initially archived model was the 1876 Liberty Bell, delivered by Croft, a confectioner from Philadelphia, PA. Croft created candy on the grounds of the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Fair and sold them in a glass gift Liberty Bell. Many more likely than not been sold, as this 145-year-old holder isn't uncommon and can be found for under $100 today. The focal point of the glass toy sweets holder industry was Jeannette, PA, a humble community outside of Pittsburgh, PA. It became home to many glass organizations as a result of the spotless consuming petroleum gas that was found there in the last part of the 1880s. The sweets holder industry didn't take off until George West, President of Westmoreland Glass, got included. In 1906, his organization began to patent glass toy sweets compartments for creation. These early Westmoreland holders were straightforward in plan and had a metal conclusion. Plans included trunks, bags, tickers, and horns made in milk glass. They were finished with paint and sold as keepsakes, denoting a year or spot. How many different glass candy container designs were produced over time? For around 100 years, about 550 distinctive glass treats compartments were delivered by no less than 13 organizations including vintage glass candy containers. A few compartments are extremely normal, while others are astoundingly uncommon, with just a couple of known models. I've been gathering these for a very long time and have most, yet not all, of them. No gatherer, past or present, has had the option to secure each model. It's simply excessively hard. In the broadest sense, current costs can go from USD 5 to $5,000, with the state of the compartment fundamentally impacting its worth. Costs expanded throughout the long term and topped around 2006. With the approach of web purchasing and selling, and eBay specifically, costs descended. Media Source: AuctionDaily
Eiichiro Oda and Hajime Isayama Show Support After Kumamoto Earthquakes
If you missed the news lately, the Kumamoto Prefecture in Kyushu, Japan was recently hit with a series of earthquakes, the foreshock on April 14th and the mainshock on April 16th. The earthquakes reached a magnitude of 7 on the Richter scale and have devastated the communities of the Prefecture and surrounding area, including as far away as the Ōita prefecture. 48 people have been confirmed dead, while thousands more have been hospitalized with injury. Over 40,000 people have been evacuated from their homes as a result of the quakes. The image you see above is a message penned by Eiichiro Oda, the mangaka responsible for One Piece. Kumamoto is Oda's hometown and so he felt personally attached to plights of the people there. The official One Piece twitter tweeted that image of a hand-drawn Luffy and Kumamon, the official mascot of the prefecture. Here's what it says in English: There was a big earthquake in Kumamoto. (all of Kyushu) I was born in Kumamoto, it's my hometown. To those who were greatly affected by the damage, I hope you're doing well from the bottom of my heart. I was able to directly contact my family and friends, but they're all very scared. But they're doing their best. Everyone I got in touch with said things to put me at ease. They're so tough!! But there is a limit to how long people can steel themselves. Before that thread breaks, I want to calm them down somehow. It's crucial that adults don't worry their kids. Most of all, I want to make kids laugh! If they laugh, adults can do their best! It's still hard now for ordinary people to lend a hand, but I will definitely help with the relief effort. Stay strong, however you can!! Oda was not the only member of the One Piece team to speak up in support of the earthquake victims, however. The voice actors for the Straw Hat Pirates also lent their voices to support Kyushu. Ikue Ohtani (Chopper), Kazuya Nakai (Zoro), Akemi Okamura (Nami), Yuriko Yamaguchi (Robin), Kazuki Yao (Franky), Kappei Yamaguchi (Usopp), and Mayumi Tanaka (Luffy) each have promised to do their bests to help the victims in some way or at least encourage them to stay strong and happy. Each of them signed the board above as a gesture of support for the struggling civilians. The Strawhats weren't the only anime/manga stars to lend their voices to the effort, though. Hajime Isayama, the mangaka for Attack on Titan is also from close to the affected region: Hita in Ōita Prefecture. Isayama also contributed a drawing as support for the victims. It shows Eren, Mikasa and Armin with Kumamon and Mejiron, Ōita Prefecture's bird mascot. Isayama wrote on his blog accompanying the image: "When times have been tough for me, even under very harsh circumstances, I'm reminded of manga heroes who fight for their lives, and I remember that they toughed it out. I drew the illustration with those feelings." Though these artists can't do a whole lot in terms of helping on the ground level with the victims, they have chosen to lend their support in the best ways they have available to them; their art. It shows a passion for their homes and their people, and the will of the nation that rallies strongly around their own in times of crisis.
Working in the Anime Industry: A Struggle
The Japanese Animation Creators Association just recently released the results of a survey taken in 2015 of over 750 different people working in the Anime industry in Japan. Coming from an American standpoint, where our entertainers are paid staggering amounts of money, you might think it would be similar for Anime creators, considering how popular the medium is. You'd be wrong. Here's a collected set of averages from Kotaku that shows the median salary for each different position in the creation of anime. Series Director Average Age: 42 years old Average Monthly Salary: 540,833 yen ($5,036) Average Yearly Salary: 6,490,000 yen ($60,437) Chief Animation Director Average Age: 43 years old Average Monthly Salary: 470,000 yen ($4,378) Average Yearly Salary: 5,640,000 yen ($52,521) Producer Average Age: 39 years old Average Monthly Salary: 451,667 yen ($4,206) Average Yearly Salary: 5,420,000 yen ($50,471) Character Designer Average Age: 38 years old Average Monthly Salary: 425,000 yen ($3,958) Average Yearly Salary: 5,100,000 yen ($47,491) Animation Director Average Age: 38 years old Average Monthly Salary: 327,500 yen ($3,045) Average Yearly Salary: 3,930,000 yen ($36,602) 3DCG Animator Average Age: 34 years old Average Monthly Salary: 320,000 yen ($2,980) Average Yearly Salary: 3,840,000 yen ($35,764) Episode Director Average Age: 41 years old Average Monthly Salary: 316,667 yen ($2,949) Average Yearly Salary: 3,800,000 yen ($35,391) Storyboarder Average Age: 49 years old Average Monthly Salary: 310,000 yen ($2,887) Average Yearly Salary: 3,720,000 yen ($34,647) Art Director (Background Art) Average Age: 35 years old Average Monthly Salary: 285,000 yen ($2,655) Average Yearly Salary: 3,420,000 yen ($31,864) Color Designer Average Age: 38 years old Average Monthly Salary: 278,333 yen ($2,593) Average Yearly Salary: 3,340,000 yen ($31,120) Cinematographer Average Age: 34 years old Average Monthly Salary: 265,833 yen ($2,476) Average Yearly Salary: 3,190,000 yen ($29,723) Production Assistant Average Age: 30 years old Average Monthly Salary: 257,000 yen ($2,394) Average Yearly Salary: 3,090,000 yen ($28,788) Key Animator Average Age: 36 years old Average Monthly Salary: 235,000 yen ($2,189) Average Yearly Salary: 2,820,000 yen ($26,271) Inbetween Checker Average Age: 35 years old Average Monthly Salary: 217,500 yen ($2,026) Average Yearly Salary: 2,610,000 yen ($24,314) Layout Artist/Rough Keyart Average Age: 38 years old Average Monthly Salary: 195,000 yen ($1,817) Average Yearly Salary: 2,340,000 yen ($21,800) Paint Staff Average Age: 26 years old Average Monthly Salary: 162,000 yen ($1,509) Average Yearly Salary: 1,950,000 yen ($18,167) 2nd Key Animation/Clean-Up Average Age: 27 years old Average Monthly Salary: 93,333 yen ($870) Average Yearly Salary: 1,120,000 yen ($10,434) Inbetween Staff Average Age: 24 years old Average Monthly Salary: 92,500 yen ($862) Average Yearly Salary: 1,110,000 yen ($10,340) The people at the top of the pyramid make the most; that's something we can understand universally. However, even at the highest salary, the numbers still pale in comparison to what series directors would be receiving here in the States. It only gets more depressing as you go down the list, where some of these positions mean that these employees are making less than minimum wage. Considering the amount of work and pressure these people are under, it's a little disheartening to see how little they earn for their efforts. So, maybe rethink your foray into the industry for now...
How to Make Katsu Curry (カツカレー), Japan's Cutlet & Curry Dish (Vegan Option)
Every so often, this is one of those plates I get a serious craving for. I always think that katsu cutlets tend to be a little too dry and that simple curry rice plates are a little bit boring, so when I'm able to order them together, I get really excited. They really balance each other out! Traditionally, katsu curry is made with chicken, beef, or pork, but you can customize this however you would want. For example, I have seen people sub the meat out for thick breaded cuts of eggplant or Portobello mushroom for an equally satisfying vegetarian dish. Katsu Curry (Makes 4 servings) INGREDIENTS: To Make the Katsu (Meat Version) - 4 pork loin chops, chicken breast, or thin steaks (about 1" thick, no bones) Salt & pepper, to taste 1/2 cup flour 1 - 2 eggs 1 cup panko or bread crumbs Oil for deep frying To Make the Katsu (Vegan/Vegetarian Version) - 4 1" thick slices of eggplant, 4 portobello caps, or 4 store-bought seitan-based cutlets (I would recommend trying Gardein's Chick'n Scallopini - thawed - for this dish.) Salt & pepper, to taste 1/2 cup flour 1 - 2 egg replacements (Ener-G Egg Replacer woould be good for this recipe.) 1 cup panko or bread crumbs Oil for frying To Make the Curry - 2 yellow onions 2 carrots 3 potatoes 1 tablespoons oil 3 1/2 cups water 1 box curry sauce mix (approximately 4 ounces) 4 cups of cooked white rice DIRECTIONS: 1) To make the katsu, make small cuts all over your cutlet of choice with tip of knife. Sprinkle salt and pepper on both sides. Coat it with flour, dip in eggs (or egg replacement), then cover with bread crumbs. 2) Heat deep frying oil to 350 F, and deep fry crumb-covered cutlet. (You can check the temperature by dropping a bread crumb. If it comes up to the oil surface right after it's dropped, it's good.) 3) Fry until color turns golden brown and cutlet floats in the oil, about 5-8 minutes, turning once or twice. Set the meat on a cooling rack for a minute. Cut into 5-6 pieces. 4) To make the curry, cut vegetables into bite size pieces. Heat oil and fry onions for 8 minutes. Add carrots and potatoes. Add water to the pot. After it boils, remove from heat and add curry sauce mix. Stir well so the pieces of the mix dissolve. Let it simmer for 10 - 15 minutes (cook longer if you'd like it thicker). If you'd like to add the optional curry powder, stir it in just before serving. 5) Put about a cup of rice on each plate, then place a katsu over the rice. Finally, generously pour curry over it. Serve while still warm.