caricakes
2 years ago5,000+ Views

Tour The Food Capital of South Korea!

Everyone knows Korean food is amazing, but even living in Korea I had never tasted food as good as what I got in Jeonju.


Jeonju is a city in the south of Korea that is famous for its bibimbap, but also just for foods of all kinds!!!

I went there with my boyfriend for a weekend and we ate SO MUCH!


My favorite was the kalguksu (칼국수) and the mandu (만두) but seriously, everything was amazing.

What's your favorite Korean food?!

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bibimbap, bulgogi, and solangtang 👌😍😋
Me and @Helixx are so going there!
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Uggggh fooooood I've never been able to have korean food but I want to try all of it.
I haven't really tried Korean food. What kind would you recommend?
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@caricakes Thank you for the recommendation I will try it in the future!
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