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What are the Korea's most useful hotlines?

What are the Korea's most useful hotlines?

what are Korea's most useful hotlines for foreigners living in Korea?
please save these numbers and safe time!

1. Fire and medical emergencies – 119
119 Fire and medical emergencies provides Fire Prevention & fire fighting and 119 rescue & first-aid services.
you can use the website to report and be assisted in various emergency situations on this website.
2. Police – 110 & 112
110 is the number to call when you want to contact the police-when it's less urgent than 112
112 is the number to call when you want to contact the police in an EMERGENCY.
Or, you can visit the website below.
3. Immigration contact center – 1345
Immigration Contact Center is a representative government contact center for foreigners that provides a comprehensive advice and information to settle down in Korea. Dial 1345 anywhere in the nation using landline or mobile phones ※ Dial 82-1345 from abroad (without an area code) * Service Hours : 09:00~22:00 * Language : ① Korean, ② Chinese, ③ English (09:00~18:00) ④ Vietnamese, ⑤ Thai, ⑥ Japanese, ⑦ Mongolian, ⑧ Indonesian/Malay, ⑨ French, ⑩ Bengali, ⑪ Urdu, ⑫ Russian, ⑬ Nepali, ⑭ Khmer, ⑮ Burmese, ⑯ German, ⑰ Spanish, ⑱ Filipino, ⑲ Arabic, ⑳ Sinhala Or you can visit the website below. http://www.hikorea.go.kr/pt/main_en.pt
4. Emergency medical information ─ 1339
For more information on disease or to report a case of infectious disease, please call KCDC call center. KCDC Call Center is available 24/7/365. All the services are toll free only in Korea (international rates are charged outside of Korea. from oversees, Please call +82-2-2163-5945.).
5. Korea Travel Hotline & Complaint Center ─ 1330
1330 Korea Travel Hotline, operated by Korea Tourism Organization (KTO), is a one-stop helpline available as a public service for local and international travelers. For any inquiries or complaints relating to Korean tourism, either beforehand or during your stay in Korea, you can seek assistance here as well.
*dial - Phone: 1330 (in Korea), +82-2-1330 (from overseas)
*time - The 1330 Korea Travel Hotline is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
Or, you can use the website below.
6. 120 Dasan Call Center
120 Dasan Call Center provides foreigners, travelling through and living in Seoul, with a variety of information services about life, transportation, and tourism.
Or, you can visit the website below.
Do you need more information? Click, here!

If you have a question, click here.
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