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Children who grow up with pets become more sensitive and sympathetic adults!
Contact with animals gives children a greater sense of responsibility, enhances empathy and increases their understanding of the cycle of life. But Why? Several studies show how children who live with pets have a more developed emotional intelligence (EI), i.e. the ability of effectively understand, manage, and express one’s feelings and interpreting those of others. This is considered to be a key factor for a better quality of life. Unlike the intelligence quotient (IQ), which experts consider to be unalterable, the emotional intelligence can progress with time, through practice. Animals can help children do this. Here are the benefits our four-legged friends can have on our kids. 1. Empathy Children living with pets early learn to take care and feed another creature, initially by observing their parents, storing up all elements they will use in every future interaction with animals. Several studies demonstrate that children who own pets feel more empathy towards other people and animals. 2. Self-esteem Taking care of animals necessarily entails responsibilities, which give children a sense of personal fulfilment and help them feeling independent and competent. Nienke Endenburg and Ben Baarda, authors of the book The Waltham Book of Human–Animal Interaction, reports an experiment in which children with low self-esteem showed great progresses after they spent 9 months with a pet in their classroom. 3. Cognitive development Spending time with pets can ease the acquisition of language and improve oral competences in children. They don’t only play with animals, but also talk to them and often read stories in their presence. Moreover, “conversing” with animals helps children fighting stutter. 4. Stress reduction Animals offer a unique emotional support, and are able to weaken negative feelings. During a research children were asked to tell who they would talk to if they find themselves in a spot, and most of them mentioned their own pets. Effectively, we often feel unconditionally supported by them, whilst other people would judge and criticise certain situations. What do you think?
Playboy BANNING Nudity From Their Magazines?
The editors behind Playboy Magazine are making a bold step toward revamping its image - one that will require fans to truly only 'read it for the articles'. Playboy has decided to no longer feature the nude pictorials of models and female celebrities it has been famous for since its first publication in 1953 - instead focusing on more diverse articles and toned down 'provocative' photoshoots. That's right, Billy Madisons of the world. Your Nudie Magazine Day has been forever changed. But why? Editor Cory Jones (pictured above) has decided that the Internet porn industry has made the Playboy centerfold a bit redundant and that changing the way the magazine's direction will help them reach a newer demographic - the 'Vice Magazine' young urban male. "The difference between us and Vice is that we're going after the guy with a job." This move might be risky, but certainly one the magazine should make. At the height of Playboy's popularity, the magazine was read by 5.6 million, but currently only circulated to roughly 800,000. The Playboy website, for similar reasons, stopped publishing nudity in August 2014 and has since enjoyed an increase of four million unique visitor per month. So what will happen to the centerfolds that have developed Playboy's trademark culture? Well, nothing's been said thus far, but Cory has made a heavy implication that they, too, have seen their demise: "Don't get me wrong, 12-year-old me is very disappointed in current me, but it's the right thing to do. You're now one click away from every sex act imaginable for free. And so it's just passé at this juncture." So now I want to know: How do YOU feel about the new Playboy? Do you think the magazine will be able to change its image, or do you think it'll be a huge marketing flop in the making?
The Ultimate Guide to Resume Writing - Part 2/6 - The Audience
So by now hopefully we've realized why putting effort into writing a resume is important, it helps you stand out when your face isn't there to do the talking for you. I've pulled a couple statistics out of the link above, and I'd like to share those. On average, for every 200 resumes read, one (1), interview will be granted. This gives your resume about 10-20 seconds to make an impression on whomever is reading it. Let's talk about the components that go into making that impression. When writing a resume, you have to know your target audience. Is your target a large, well-established corporation? Chances are you'll be writing a more formal resume. A brand new start-up focused on sending the word "Yo" to anyone with the app (actually exists....)? Changes are your resume will be much more conversationally written. Knowing your audience enables you to tailor both what you list on your resume and how you list it. What values and skills does the target company need? What experiences do you have that will address those? These are two of the main questions to be asking yourself when writing (which we will get to in part 3). I like to ask myself another question here. What superficially unrelated experiences have I had that I can link to the target company/position. For example, when I was applying for positions at a company that works in an international market, detailing my experiences with adapting to foreign environments and customs helped get me interviews and a position there for next summer. Even though these were not always jobs (just travel in many cases), it showcased an adaptability that the company did not know it wanted, and as such made a great impression! Talking about yourself when writing a resume can be an awkward experience, to say the least. It is hard to draw a line between advertising yourself and bragging or being arrogant. Day to day, we don't have to advertise ourselves (generalizations I know), and as such tend to be more modest about accomplishments and skills. A resume is not the place to downplay your achievements. Make assertions about what you have done, and make sure these assertions are based in facts. Don't exaggerate to the point where a past employer would say that your description is inconsistent with the work you did in that position. You want to make sure that you accurately and glowingly describe yourself to whomever reads your resume. To pull another quote from the article I linked, "People more often buy the best advertised product than the best product." You need to show how your combination of skills and mindset (or whatever characteristics you are focusing on) put you at an advantage. You may not have a perfect 4.0 in university, but having a broader skillset can easily make up for differences in abilities. Companies aren't hiring robots, they are hiring people to work within teams and those who can progress and learn. Now we come to an interesting subject, summaries. I have seen resumes that have summaries, I personally do not have one. I feel it is more important to keep your resume to a single side of a single page (at least early in a career) than it is to summarize what you are planning to say in person. Granted, this approach is based on my personal situation, as my resumes are given out in person and are accompanied by conversations with a recruiter or such. For applications online, a summary may be more in order, but I've still left my summary to the cover letter (a more personalized note to whomever/whichever company you are applying to). (I'm thinking about doing explanations about cover letters after I finish my sections on resumes). Long story short, a summary is your choice, but don't get bogged down in tedious wording, it will tire the reader and will get your resume tossed (often literally into a bin). Once you've identified who you are speaking to, what you want to communicate to them, and how you want to do just that, you are ready to start writing your resume! Remember as we go forward, resumes are not to be set in stone, let yours be flexible, change it, update it, personalize it to the company you are applying to, trust me, it makes a difference. Next time we will actually begin the process of writing your resume!
Graphic Design Tip: How to Brainstorm an Effective Logo
Before I started going to art school, my parents (as a lot of parents do) really overestimated my own abilities. During my high school years, they launched their own non-profit organization for breast cancer advocacy, where the entire group was essentially run out of a room of our house. My father was in charge of building the website and making sure that it ran smoothly. My mother was the spokesperson, often attending various conventions and symposiums to address those in the medical field about breast cancer and HER2+, a more aggressive expression. Launching the group was running quite smoothly until my parents approached me with a favor. They wanted me to design their logo. Andddd it didn't go so well. They gave up and found a professional. Fast forward to my life after art school, and I'm looking back at my high school years wishing I could have helped teenage me come up with a great logo design. While creating a logo is not as easy as it looks, it really is perhaps one of my favorite design challenges. There is a lot to consider when you're making a logo, and I've decided that it might be helpful to make a simplified list for all of you Vingle designers so that you can go out into the branding world and create beautiful things! 1. Keep it simple. As fun as it is to be given the opportunity to really utilize your creative side, it really isn't the appropriate time to start busting out all of those fancy and elaborate tricks you might have learned doing other projects. Creating a visually 'busy' logo is just not effective marketing. 2. Keep in mind that you're creating a symbol to represent a company. It can be pretty direct symbolism, ie: the apple logo for Apple or the red cross for American Red Cross, or it can be more abstract, similar to the Nike swoosh. Another popular logo option is to reduce down to a strictly typographic design. Disney or Kellogg's is a good example of effective typographic logos. Get creative, but keep it simple. My favorite example of balance between creativity and minimalism is the FedEx logo. Have you ever noticed there's an arrow between the E and the X? 3. Do your research. Before thumbnailing your own logo ideas, think of all of the logos you've seen that really caught your attention. Even try drawing them out freehand. Look up interviews with the advertising designers behind some of the world's most famous logos. I would recommend "To Inform and Delight", a documentary about Milton Glaser, the artist who designed the I♥NY logo. 4. When you're finally ready, begin making a list of all the descriptive words you associate with the company and how you want your audience to feel when looking at your logo, like 'friendly' or 'sophisticated'. Then think about your nouns. When you think about your company, what images come to mind? If you were creating a logo for Tropicana Orange Juice, for example, maybe the first thing you think of is a tree or an orange or a glass. Try to think of as many nouns as possible, as these will definitely help you when you start putting pencil to paper. 4. USE YOUR SKETCHBOOK. I can't stress the importance of this. I feel like a lot of artists go straight to their laptops and begin working on Photoshop or Illustrator over working on actual thumbnails first. Technology can really stifle the creative process that is so important in the early stages of design. Draw at least 100 thumbnails in your sketchbook. It will really help you push your own boundaries and give you a number of ideas to choose from. 5. When considering which thumbnail you want to use, think about the different ways your logo will be translated for pamphlets, packages, and other promotional materials. Does your logo translate well to color AND black and white? How does it look on a dark background versus a light background? How does the logo look with text and without text? Is it as visually effective when you adjust the scale? Manipulate your logo over and over, and if it is still recognizable, you probably have yourself a really iconic logo! I hope this can help some of you designers and marketers, especially those of you who might be in the middle of branding or rebranding a company. The logo is always the first start! Happy designing!
Get Paid To Cuddle Goats!
Feeling the strain of your office job? Has stress reached an all-time high? Maybe you're looking for something a little more? Well, fortunately, you're in luck, as a Virginia-based dairy farm is looking to hire volunteers to cuddle their goats. That's right. You - yes, you! - can be a professional goat cuddler. Caromont Farm is mainly a dairy purveyor, and its base farm in Esmont, Virgninia houses several cows and goats, and as the farm strives to ethically care for the livestock in their possession, all the animals are grass-fed and cared for by someone they describe as an 'assistant goat herds(wo)man'. (That could be you. If you get the job, that is.) According to the official job posting, in order to be an aforementioned goat-cuddling herdsman, these are the requirements the company expects from applicants: Able to lift 50 pounds Committed to local food and agriculture Works well independently and on a team Willing to take initiative Excited to learn Goat lover! Spanish speaking a plus+ Am I the only one that's a little confused as to why something like Spanish-speaking is required to hang out with goats? Anyway, if you know someone in the Virginia area that is willing to get their snuggle on with a billy goat, feel free to send them to the official volunteer website, where they'll be able to sign up for a four-hour cuddle shift. For the rest of you, I just want to know this: Would YOU want to become a professional goat cuddler? Or does your fear of intimacy extend to livestock? (Just kidding. I just wanted to make a creepy joke.) Anyway, leave your thoughts in the comment area below, and for more WTF news, follow the WTF Street Journal collection!
In-N-Out Comes To Australia; Sells Out Instantly
Thanks to the glory that is social media, 'foodie' culture has allowed for plenty of marketing potential in the restaurant industry. When we have a good meal (or, at least, an incredibly aesthetically pleasing one), we take a picture for Instagram, we check-in on Facebook, we leave a review on Yelp. In fact, in a recent survey conducted by Compete.com, 50% of adults aged 18 - 32 years said they become aware of particular foods and restaurants via social media. Which is why, when California fast food chain In-N-Out Burger made its way to Australia this week, the results were unlike anything you would've expected in a pre-Facebook generation. Because of their viral success, In-N-Out is able to open 'pop up' shops all around the world, allowing local food porn enthusiasts just four hours to be able to try their famous burgers for themselves. Because of the limited time and the increasing concept of 'FOMO', the lines are understandably huge, and Sydney, Australia's case was no different. (Aussie food blogger Rebecca Sullivan called it "herd mentality in its most embarrassing form." I call it, "How dare you underestimate the majesty of a dope-ass hamburger!") Unfortunately, the In-N-Out pop-up only had enough ingredients to make 300 or so burgers, so employees gave out wristbands to the first 300 people in line, and then sent everyone else on their way. (Will this make them rue the day they met In-N-Out? Will this only make them try harder next time? Who knows.) But, as a Californian, this whole event had me thinking: Have you had In-N-Out before? Do you want to try In-N-Out? If you don't live near one, and an In-N-Out pop-up came to your neighborhood, would you try to go? Let me know in the comments below what YOU think, and for more WTF news, follow my WTF Street Journal collection.
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