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Learn Korean with BTS - DNA
Hey this is Soobak :) Let's learn Korean with BTS again friends :) Follow along the numbered vocabs :) ์ฒซ๋ˆˆ์— ๋„ ์•Œ์•„๋ณด๊ฒŒ ๋์–ด ์„œ๋กค ๋ถˆ๋Ÿฌ์™”๋˜ ๊ฒƒ์ฒ˜๋Ÿผ ๋‚ด ํ˜ˆ๊ด€ ์† DNA๊ฐ€ ๋งํ•ด์ค˜ ๋‚ด๊ฐ€ ์ฐพ์•„ ํ—ค๋งค๋˜ ๋„ˆ๋ผ๋Š” ๊ฑธ ์šฐ๋ฆฌ ๋งŒ๋‚จ์€ (1)์ˆ˜ํ•™์˜ ๊ณต์‹ ์ข…๊ต์˜ ์œจ๋ฒ• ์šฐ์ฃผ์˜ ์„ญ๋ฆฌ ๋‚ด๊ฒŒ ์ฃผ์–ด์ง„ (2)์šด๋ช…์˜ ์ฆ๊ฑฐ ๋„ˆ๋Š” ๋‚ด ๊ฟˆ์˜ ์ถœ์ฒ˜ Take it take it ๋„ˆ์—๊ฒŒ ๋‚ด๋ฏผ ๋‚ด ์†์€ ์ •ํ•ด์ง„ ์ˆ™๋ช… (3)๊ฑฑ์ •ํ•˜์ง€ ๋งˆ love ์ด ๋ชจ๋“  ๊ฑด ์šฐ์—ฐ์ด ์•„๋‹ˆ๋‹ˆ๊นŒ ์šฐ๋ฆฐ ์™„์ „ ๋‹ฌ๋ผ baby ์šด๋ช…์„ ์ฐพ์•„๋‚ธ ๋‘˜์ด๋‹ˆ๊นŒ ์šฐ์ฃผ๊ฐ€ ์ƒ๊ธด ๊ทธ ๋‚ ๋ถ€ํ„ฐ ๊ณ„์† ๋ฌดํ•œ์˜ ์„ธ๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๋„˜์–ด์„œ ๊ณ„์† (4)์šฐ๋ฆฐ ์ „์ƒ์—๋„ ์•„๋งˆ ๋‹ค์Œ ์ƒ์—๋„ ์˜์›ํžˆ ํ•จ๊ป˜๋‹ˆ๊นŒ ์ด ๋ชจ๋“  ๊ฑด ์šฐ์—ฐ์ด ์•„๋‹ˆ๋‹ˆ๊นŒ ์šด๋ช…์„ ์ฐพ์•„๋‚ธ ๋‘˜์ด๋‹ˆ๊นŒ DNA I want it this love I want it real love ๋‚œ ๋„ˆ์—๊ฒŒ๋งŒ ์ง‘์ค‘ํ•ด ์ข€ ๋” ์„ธ๊ฒŒ ๋‚  ์ด๋„๋„ค ํƒœ์ดˆ์˜ DNA๊ฐ€ ๋„ ์›ํ•˜๋Š”๋ฐ ์ด๊ฑด ํ•„์—ฐ์ด์•ผ I love us ์šฐ๋ฆฌ๋งŒ์ด true lovers ๊ทธ๋…€๋ฅผ ๋ณผ ๋•Œ๋งˆ๋‹ค ์†Œ์Šค๋ผ์น˜๊ฒŒ ๋†€๋ผ ์‹ ๊ธฐํ•˜๊ฒŒ ์ž๊พธ๋งŒ ์ˆจ์ด ๋ฉŽ๋Š” ๊ฒŒ ์ฐธ (5)์ด์ƒํ•ด ์„ค๋งˆ ์ด๋Ÿฐ ๊ฒŒ ๋ง๋กœ๋งŒ ๋“ฃ๋˜ ์‚ฌ๋ž‘์ด๋ž€ ๊ฐ์ •์ผ๊นŒ ์• ์ดˆ๋ถ€ํ„ฐ ๋‚ด ์‹ฌ์žฅ์€ ๋„ ํ–ฅํ•ด ๋›ฐ๋‹ˆ๊นŒ ๊ฑฑ์ •ํ•˜์ง€ ๋งˆ love ์ด ๋ชจ๋“  ๊ฑด (6)์šฐ์—ฐ์ด ์•„๋‹ˆ๋‹ˆ๊นŒ ์šฐ๋ฆฐ ์™„์ „ ๋‹ฌ๋ผ baby ์šด๋ช…์„ ์ฐพ์•„๋‚ธ ๋‘˜์ด๋‹ˆ๊นŒ ์šฐ์ฃผ๊ฐ€ ์ƒ๊ธด ๊ทธ ๋‚ ๋ถ€ํ„ฐ ๊ณ„์† ๋ฌดํ•œ์˜ ์„ธ๊ธฐ๋ฅผ ๋„˜์–ด์„œ ๊ณ„์† ์šฐ๋ฆฐ ์ „์ƒ์—๋„ ์•„๋งˆ ๋‹ค์Œ ์ƒ์—๋„ ์˜์›ํžˆ ํ•จ๊ป˜๋‹ˆ๊นŒ ์ด ๋ชจ๋“  ๊ฑด ์šฐ์—ฐ์ด ์•„๋‹ˆ๋‹ˆ๊นŒ ์šด๋ช…์„ ์ฐพ์•„๋‚ธ ๋‘˜์ด๋‹ˆ๊นŒ DNA ๋Œ์•„๋ณด์ง€ ๋ง์•„ ์šด๋ช…์„ ์ฐพ์•„๋‚ธ ์šฐ๋ฆฌ๋‹ˆ๊นŒ ํ›„ํšŒํ•˜์ง€ ๋ง์•„ baby ์˜์›ํžˆ ์˜์›ํžˆ ์˜์›ํžˆ ์˜์›ํžˆ ํ•จ๊ป˜๋‹ˆ๊นŒ ๊ฑฑ์ •ํ•˜์ง€ ๋งˆ love ์ด ๋ชจ๋“  ๊ฑด ์šฐ์—ฐ์ด ์•„๋‹ˆ๋‹ˆ๊นŒ ์šฐ๋ฆฐ ์™„์ „ ๋‹ฌ๋ผ baby ์šด๋ช…์„ ์ฐพ์•„๋‚ธ ๋‘˜์ด๋‹ˆ๊นŒ La la la la la La la la la la ์šฐ์—ฐ์ด ์•„๋‹ˆ๋‹ˆ๊นŒ La la la la la La la la la la ์šฐ์—ฐ์ด ์•„๋‹ˆ๋‹ˆ๊นŒ DNA (1) ์ˆ˜ํ•™: math Pronunciation: [soo hak] (2) ์šด๋ช…: destiny Pronunciation: [woon myung] (3) ๊ฑฑ์ •: worry Pronunciation: [gok jung] (4) ์šฐ๋ฆฐ: we are Pronunciation: [woorin] sentence example: we are weird --> woorin i sang hae (5) ์ด์ƒํ•ด: weird Pronunciation: [i sang hae] (6) ์šฐ์—ฐ: coincidence Pronunciation: [woo yeon] Ask any Korean related questions to SOOBAK <3 Play & Talk about Korean Here!!
Working in the Anime Industry: A Struggle
The Japanese Animation Creators Association just recently released the results of a survey taken in 2015 of over 750 different people working in the Anime industry in Japan. Coming from an American standpoint, where our entertainers are paid staggering amounts of money, you might think it would be similar for Anime creators, considering how popular the medium is. You'd be wrong. Here's a collected set of averages from Kotaku that shows the median salary for each different position in the creation of anime. Series Director Average Age: 42 years old Average Monthly Salary: 540,833 yen ($5,036) Average Yearly Salary: 6,490,000 yen ($60,437) Chief Animation Director Average Age: 43 years old Average Monthly Salary: 470,000 yen ($4,378) Average Yearly Salary: 5,640,000 yen ($52,521) Producer Average Age: 39 years old Average Monthly Salary: 451,667 yen ($4,206) Average Yearly Salary: 5,420,000 yen ($50,471) Character Designer Average Age: 38 years old Average Monthly Salary: 425,000 yen ($3,958) Average Yearly Salary: 5,100,000 yen ($47,491) Animation Director Average Age: 38 years old Average Monthly Salary: 327,500 yen ($3,045) Average Yearly Salary: 3,930,000 yen ($36,602) 3DCG Animator Average Age: 34 years old Average Monthly Salary: 320,000 yen ($2,980) Average Yearly Salary: 3,840,000 yen ($35,764) Episode Director Average Age: 41 years old Average Monthly Salary: 316,667 yen ($2,949) Average Yearly Salary: 3,800,000 yen ($35,391) Storyboarder Average Age: 49 years old Average Monthly Salary: 310,000 yen ($2,887) Average Yearly Salary: 3,720,000 yen ($34,647) Art Director (Background Art) Average Age: 35 years old Average Monthly Salary: 285,000 yen ($2,655) Average Yearly Salary: 3,420,000 yen ($31,864) Color Designer Average Age: 38 years old Average Monthly Salary: 278,333 yen ($2,593) Average Yearly Salary: 3,340,000 yen ($31,120) Cinematographer Average Age: 34 years old Average Monthly Salary: 265,833 yen ($2,476) Average Yearly Salary: 3,190,000 yen ($29,723) Production Assistant Average Age: 30 years old Average Monthly Salary: 257,000 yen ($2,394) Average Yearly Salary: 3,090,000 yen ($28,788) Key Animator Average Age: 36 years old Average Monthly Salary: 235,000 yen ($2,189) Average Yearly Salary: 2,820,000 yen ($26,271) Inbetween Checker Average Age: 35 years old Average Monthly Salary: 217,500 yen ($2,026) Average Yearly Salary: 2,610,000 yen ($24,314) Layout Artist/Rough Keyart Average Age: 38 years old Average Monthly Salary: 195,000 yen ($1,817) Average Yearly Salary: 2,340,000 yen ($21,800) Paint Staff Average Age: 26 years old Average Monthly Salary: 162,000 yen ($1,509) Average Yearly Salary: 1,950,000 yen ($18,167) 2nd Key Animation/Clean-Up Average Age: 27 years old Average Monthly Salary: 93,333 yen ($870) Average Yearly Salary: 1,120,000 yen ($10,434) Inbetween Staff Average Age: 24 years old Average Monthly Salary: 92,500 yen ($862) Average Yearly Salary: 1,110,000 yen ($10,340) The people at the top of the pyramid make the most; that's something we can understand universally. However, even at the highest salary, the numbers still pale in comparison to what series directors would be receiving here in the States. It only gets more depressing as you go down the list, where some of these positions mean that these employees are making less than minimum wage. Considering the amount of work and pressure these people are under, it's a little disheartening to see how little they earn for their efforts. So, maybe rethink your foray into the industry for now...
Children who grow up with pets become more sensitive and sympathetic adults!
Contact with animals gives children a greater sense of responsibility, enhances empathy and increases their understanding of the cycle of life. But Why? Several studies show how children who live with pets have a more developed emotional intelligence (EI), i.e. the ability of effectively understand, manage, and express oneโ€™s feelings and interpreting those of others. This is considered to be a key factor for a better quality of life. Unlike the intelligence quotient (IQ), which experts consider to be unalterable, the emotional intelligence can progress with time, through practice. Animals can help children do this. Here are the benefits our four-legged friends can have on our kids. 1. Empathy Children living with pets early learn to take care and feed another creature, initially by observing their parents, storing up all elements they will use in every future interaction with animals. Several studies demonstrate that children who own pets feel more empathy towards other people and animals. 2. Self-esteem Taking care of animals necessarily entails responsibilities, which give children a sense of personal fulfilment and help them feeling independent and competent. Nienke Endenburg and Ben Baarda, authors of the book The Waltham Book of Humanโ€“Animal Interaction, reports an experiment in which children with low self-esteem showed great progresses after they spent 9 months with a pet in their classroom. 3. Cognitive development Spending time with pets can ease the acquisition of language and improve oral competences in children. They donโ€™t only play with animals, but also talk to them and often read stories in their presence. Moreover, โ€œconversingโ€ with animals helps children fighting stutter. 4. Stress reduction Animals offer a unique emotional support, and are able to weaken negative feelings. During a research children were asked to tell who they would talk to if they find themselves in a spot, and most of them mentioned their own pets. Effectively, we often feel unconditionally supported by them, whilst other people would judge and criticise certain situations. What do you think?
What Is Wage Theft?
And more importantly: What can you do about it? Wage theft can take a lot of forms. It can mean that an employee is being paid less than the minimum wage in their state, or that any work considered overtime is not paid at the overtime rate. It also includes labor that an employee is doing off the clock (i.e. not being paid for). Deductions in wages due to fabricated workplace violations, pressure not to take paid sick or vacation days, and misclassification of employees as contractors also falls under this term. Some figures estimate that in 2008, workers in Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York City lost more than $2.9 billion due to employment and labor law violations. That's an appalling number! How is that even possible?! Lots of employees either don't realize their rights, or are worried that they'll lose their jobs if they try to report the issue. Additionally, the justice system often fails people who do report- even if they win their cases there's very little enforcement of labor laws, which means employers can continue to withhold the money the employee was rightfully due (via the UCLA Labor Center). This isn't an issue of a few bad employers, it's a systemic problem. Laws and enforcement of them simply aren't doing enough to protect working people. What can you do? If you feel that your employer hasn't properly compensated you for your work, the National Consumers League has a great resource ---> HERE about how to file a claim. If this ticks you off as much as it does me, I recommend writing to your representatives. At the State AND Local level (you can do that HERE). Often issues regarding wage theft are dealt with on the state level, not the national. Which means that the politicians closer to home are the ones you need to speak to- and because local elections see less voter turnout it means that every vote really does matter.
Adventures of an Entrepreneurial Introvert
Week 2 So, I'm gonna let you all in on a little secret....I'm starting a business! As an introvert, what kind of business would you imagine I would start? Crafting? Transcription? Graphic design? Anything to avoid social settings, right? Nope, not me. I am opening an errand service. I thought...I'd really like to help the elderly and disabled and public service providers (police, fire fighters, social workers, etc.) get their groceries, pay their bills, and get all of their other errands done. Make life easier for them. I thought about how time consuming errands can be, and I thought about how if doesn't really bother me. I thought about how happy folks might be, with someone to lighten the load a little. What I didn't think about was just how much I might have to interact with people. No, I'm not antisocial...I just have a small, quickly drained social battery. I don't have any customers yet, but I have been beating pavement to advertise my services. And it has been awkward, to say the least. Stuttering and brain dead when they ask what services I offer or what my rates are. Nervous shifting...starting to leave, then lingering momentarily as I try figure out if they're still wanting to talk. Focusing a little too much on maintaining eye contact, so that I have to ask them to repeat what they just asked. In the past two weeks, it hasn't really been that bad...I suppose it's because the excitement of starting my own business kept it mostly at bay. But now the doubts are nibbling at the edges as the excitement wanes a little and I notice my anxieties and discomfort. The utter lack of customers doesn't help. But it's okay, I'm okay...I'm patient and hopeful. I am sure I can tackle these social challenges like I do everything else. What do I do? Honestly, I don't know. But I have been reflecting, and I have identified some interesting points i might be able to use to my advantage. 1. I don't have any trouble with one on one conversations. It's only when there's two or more people that i get anxious. 2. I do better when I have just done something completely different just before. My toddler has been accompanying me as I promote my business (don't worry, it's a small town, and people are surprisingly understanding), and just after we go to the park or stop off at the house to give him a quick change or break, is when I feel most confidant and outgoing. A quick recharge, I suppose. 3. I might need to tap a more extroverted friend to help get the word out there. I don't really like feeling like I'm relying on someone else, but I might just have to swallow my pride to get this business off the ground. So, yeah...I have some hurdles to conquer...I should get on that now, before my procrastination tries to kick in, too.
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