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Viral Star "Damn Daniel" Meets Ellen
Daaaaaaaamn Daniel. If you haven't seen the viral video of the newly famed star "Damn Daniel" then you're probably living off the grid. With a hilarious voice coming from high school sophomore Josh Holz, he has been making hilarious vines of his friend, Daniel Lara. Daniel is only 14 years old and a freshman at Riverside Poly High School, CA. The young heart throb is now raking in thousands of fans across social media attracting super-fandom overnight. Hundreds of crazy rumors have flooded the web, everything from Daniel being attacked to he's in hiding. Everyone is just looking for a story to add to the media craze. There are currently a pair of white vans online selling for $300,000 hoping to get someone gullible enough to buy them. This quick rise to fame though hasn't come without consequences. A recent news article hit that fans are pranking and storming Holz's home in California to get a glimpse of the kid behind the voice. The vine has also led to some negative parodies online which have garnered some heat. Of course it was a given that "Damn Daniel" and the voice behind it would appear on The Ellen Show. After a hilarious interview between Ellen and the boys, she surprised them with gifts. For Holz, she gave him an epic and brand new surfboard to commemorate his visit to the show. However, Damn Daniel was the one who truly came home with a winning prize by receiving a lifetime supply of Vans shoes thanks to Ellen partnering with Vans HQ. Talk about an awesome gift! "Back at it again with the white vans!"
10 Tea Bags Designs That Are Anything But Ordinary
I am a sucker for interesting product design, and when it comes to trends in the world of food and beverage, tea bags are definitely what has me reaching for my wallet. (Just in case you weren't a tea hoarder already, they had to go ahead and make the bags cute too!) Here are tea bag designs that I'm currently obsessed with. If you're someone who equally enjoys being aesthetically pleased, you have to check these out! Charm Villa's stunning goldfish tea bag is in such high demand that it's only sold individually - for $20 a piece! This chamomile tea by BOH goes from stress to serene - shifting from 'bird of prey' to 'dove' by just adding water. Got a bouquet? Give your tea bags a DIY update by tying the string to the ends of your favorite flower buds. This tPod design by Austrian artist Elisabeth Soos taps into your inner child with a charming paper boat that actually floats! What would a royal tea be without sharing a 'cuppa' with your favorite British monarch? Thanks, Royaltea! Here's another DIY that anchors your tea in place with charming paper 'Polaroid'-style cut-outs. These ceylon tea 'cigaretteas' by concept artist Anton Schnaider are the only cigarettes I could ever want! Bungee jumping might be a high-stress activity, but these bungee jumping herbal blends will calm you down in no time! Head to Etsy to find some adorable tea bags for the culture vulture in your life - from TMNT to GoT's Jon Snow. And speaking of epic independent designers, check out this Gaga tea set by graphic design student Nathalie Hallman - which was actually part of her art school application! So which one of these was YOUR favorite tea? Do you have any cute or interesting tea bags at home? Let me know in the comments below!
My Experience as being a Graphic Designer.
Hi Guys! As most of you may know that I've recently (September 19th, 2018) graduated from my college campus with my Bachelor's in Bachelor's of Fine Arts Graphic Design. However I'm stil looking for a job in my field. There are always going to be struggles with my career. If you don't know, Graphic Design is the most Competive job that is out there, thou any job will be competive to get, but being a Graphic Designer is the most difficult when you have many other designers competiting for the position and sometimes you may get picked or someone else will. I mean if they got pick they obviously deserved it. While in college I've made a lot of friends that are in Graphics Design. Honestly I loved making friends that were in my field of study however they were also my competition. Some I won't even call my competition because there work was questionable. However there was atleast 2-3 girls that are my competition and still are to this day. One of them she is my number 1 competition but I really love her style, however we would talk a lot about what we like and our art style and give each other feedback which to me is the reason why she's ranked number 1 on my list. You'll get Harsh critiques I can't tell you how many times I've gotten critiques or seen others get mad over critiques. When someone critiques your work, critiques are there to help you improve your art work, I've seen so many students totally avoid them because they take it to personally or they don't think that they need them. You'll get better at handling as you go on, because I've gotten praised on it before, at my first internship, it was the most harsh critique I've had however he was more surpirse at how composed I was to understanding it, and I explained that the school I go to help prepare for these moemtns because they're going to happen. Interviewing Skills You'll get a lot of interviews . If you aren't that good thats ok, you work on those skills through practice, also your artwork will speak for itself as well when they see your portfolio work. My college had help practiced with these skills as well, when asked "what skills have you acquired working at your current job" I had working at my school, my first response was "I didn't have any".....don't say that...a year and a half later, I actually got better and had said "I have good customer service skills, planning out our schedule, answering tech support questions" etc... It jsut takes practice and time, and don't be afraid to ask for help. Finding a Job Finding a job isn't that difficult believe it or not. However My location isn't a good plave to find my position. I live in Michigan, and if you know Michigan....its known for the automobile and professional buisness. Honestly Michgian isn't really known for a creative state. I suggest being open to traveling to a different state that you have a higher chance at getting a job. Computer / Software Computer: My advice is to not ask someone what computer they should get. either way of a PC or a MAC they're both good for design work. It personally comes down to your personal preference of what you like. For me I like both PC and MAC I like MAC's becuae they're more user friendly with Graphic Design than a PC but I can work on both platforms. Software: The Software that Graphics Designers use are Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. You can pay monthly or yearly for the programs however if you have the money to buy the programs then I would do that it would save you lots of time and money when you have the full software. Want to know More? Here is a YouTube video I found for Graphic Design Major & Career if you're interested looking at. Anime Obsession Tag Crew! Please let me know if you’d like to be added or removed. Thanks {A} - @AimeBolanos @AnbuRose @AnimeFreak484 @AnimeLove300 @animerg13 @AustinThurston @assasingod {B} - {C} - {D} - @DragonShaow @DripDrop {E} - @EmilyPeacock {F} - {G} - {H} - {I}- {J} - {K} - @KingHamura {L} - {M} - @MorganAlys {N} - {O} - {P} - {Q} - {R} - {S} - @SimplyAwkward {T} - {U}- {V} - {X} - {Y} - {Z} -
Graphic Design Tip: How to Brainstorm an Effective Logo
Before I started going to art school, my parents (as a lot of parents do) really overestimated my own abilities. During my high school years, they launched their own non-profit organization for breast cancer advocacy, where the entire group was essentially run out of a room of our house. My father was in charge of building the website and making sure that it ran smoothly. My mother was the spokesperson, often attending various conventions and symposiums to address those in the medical field about breast cancer and HER2+, a more aggressive expression. Launching the group was running quite smoothly until my parents approached me with a favor. They wanted me to design their logo. Andddd it didn't go so well. They gave up and found a professional. Fast forward to my life after art school, and I'm looking back at my high school years wishing I could have helped teenage me come up with a great logo design. While creating a logo is not as easy as it looks, it really is perhaps one of my favorite design challenges. There is a lot to consider when you're making a logo, and I've decided that it might be helpful to make a simplified list for all of you Vingle designers so that you can go out into the branding world and create beautiful things! 1. Keep it simple. As fun as it is to be given the opportunity to really utilize your creative side, it really isn't the appropriate time to start busting out all of those fancy and elaborate tricks you might have learned doing other projects. Creating a visually 'busy' logo is just not effective marketing. 2. Keep in mind that you're creating a symbol to represent a company. It can be pretty direct symbolism, ie: the apple logo for Apple or the red cross for American Red Cross, or it can be more abstract, similar to the Nike swoosh. Another popular logo option is to reduce down to a strictly typographic design. Disney or Kellogg's is a good example of effective typographic logos. Get creative, but keep it simple. My favorite example of balance between creativity and minimalism is the FedEx logo. Have you ever noticed there's an arrow between the E and the X? 3. Do your research. Before thumbnailing your own logo ideas, think of all of the logos you've seen that really caught your attention. Even try drawing them out freehand. Look up interviews with the advertising designers behind some of the world's most famous logos. I would recommend "To Inform and Delight", a documentary about Milton Glaser, the artist who designed the I♥NY logo. 4. When you're finally ready, begin making a list of all the descriptive words you associate with the company and how you want your audience to feel when looking at your logo, like 'friendly' or 'sophisticated'. Then think about your nouns. When you think about your company, what images come to mind? If you were creating a logo for Tropicana Orange Juice, for example, maybe the first thing you think of is a tree or an orange or a glass. Try to think of as many nouns as possible, as these will definitely help you when you start putting pencil to paper. 4. USE YOUR SKETCHBOOK. I can't stress the importance of this. I feel like a lot of artists go straight to their laptops and begin working on Photoshop or Illustrator over working on actual thumbnails first. Technology can really stifle the creative process that is so important in the early stages of design. Draw at least 100 thumbnails in your sketchbook. It will really help you push your own boundaries and give you a number of ideas to choose from. 5. When considering which thumbnail you want to use, think about the different ways your logo will be translated for pamphlets, packages, and other promotional materials. Does your logo translate well to color AND black and white? How does it look on a dark background versus a light background? How does the logo look with text and without text? Is it as visually effective when you adjust the scale? Manipulate your logo over and over, and if it is still recognizable, you probably have yourself a really iconic logo! I hope this can help some of you designers and marketers, especially those of you who might be in the middle of branding or rebranding a company. The logo is always the first start! Happy designing!
Product Photography - DIY
Make your trinkets look legit in photos--that you happen to take yourself. With just a few tools (that you already own), you can take professional-looking product photos of just about anything that's small. I found this DIY hack on LifeHack.org. You can read the full article here if you'd like. Photo credit: Canon/Little Visuals via littlevisuals.co What you need: Camera Laptop Shiny black surface (like a tablet that's not turned on) Piece of white paper Small light 2 Binder clips (And any item you want to photograph, like a perfume bottle) Get Started 1. Google search for "bokeh" in images. Find an interesting picture you'd like to use as your background. Download the image and open to fill the screen. 2. Lay the item with the shiny black surface, (like a tablet) over your keyboard 3. Angle the screen at a slightly forward to prevent a glare. 4. If need be, lower the brightness setting on your laptop so it's not too bright. 5. Place object (you want to photograph) on the shiny surface in front of the screen. 6. Clip the sheet of paper at two ends using binder clips. 7. Placement of the paper should be at the left corner of your laptop keyboard. 8. Using a small lamp, shine the light through the paper to the object. 9. Face camera straight on in front of laptop. 10. Take photo. This is what your ordinary perfume bottle looks like when you're finished. Photo editing software no longer needed. TIP Make sure your shiny black surface is clean and free of debris, finger prints and lint. A compressed can of air can eliminate dust and lint very well.
Pixar changed multiple scenes in 'Inside Out' to cater to International Audiences
What you see depends on the country you live in. If you walk into a movie theater somewhere else in the world, Pixar's 'Inside Out' may look a little different from the American version you saw back at home. From the food to the sports to the cultural mannerisms, some things are slightly different. Pixar created 28 graphics for 45 uniquely different shots to be inserted for local audiences. So far Pixar has made over $553 million to date spanning multiple countries across the world. Director Pete Docter said they wanted the film to remain complex and emotional while making sense with the foreign audience's culture. Sometimes Pixar films aren't strictly perfect domestically so they make some tweaks to create the best product. This isn't the first company to change it's movie for a foreign audience. Marvel with "Iron Man 3" added scenes for Chinese audiences to incorporate Gu Li Duo, a popular Chinese milk drink, and a scene where Iron Man is saved by a famous Chinese character. In Adam Sandler's "Pixels", a scene was taken out so that Chinese audiences would not see the Great Wall of China destroyed. As you can see, your country has a huge influence. Doctor said for 'Inside Out', “We learned that some of our content wouldn’t make sense in other countries. For example, in Japan, broccoli is not considered gross. Kids love it. So we asked them, ‘What’s gross to you?’ They said green bell peppers, so we remodeled and reanimated three separate scenes replacing our broccoli with green peppers.” In this scene, Riley's dad is having a hard time getting her to eat broccoli. She squirms and turns away in disgust as he continuously attempts to have her eat it. In the United States, it is a normal thing for a child to dislike broccoli. But in Japan, broccoli is substituted by bell peppers since Japanese children think those are gross instead. That slight cultural difference changed an entire scene in the film to be more relatable and to evoke EMOTION. Though Hockey is traditionally a Canadian pastime, Hockey is still largely popular in the northern parts of the United States such as US state, Minnesota. Hockey is still just as American for many people however most of the world isn't exposed to hockey frequently which is why Pixar changed it to soccer. Soccer is the world's most popular sport. Docter also mentioned,“We offered a version with soccer instead of hockey since soccer is huge in so many parts of the world. But some countries that are into soccer actually decided to stick with hockey since the characters in the movie are from Minnesota and it makes sense that they’d be hockey fans.” Did you know that even how we read words is different in various parts of the world? Well Pixar took note of that being noted by Docter, "Bing Bong reads a sign in the film to Joy and Sadness. He points at the letters, D-A-N-G-E-R, saying ‘it’s a shortcut.’ Not only did we translate the sign, but we even went so far as to reanimate Bing Bong so that he points to the letters from right to left, instead of left to right to accommodate certain languages.” Do you think it's necessary to change a movie for a foreign audience?
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