JamesBurns
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This Frog Doesn't Care

Not only is this picture just plain hilarious, but also I think it captures how beautiful the Red-Eyed Tree Frog really is. As its name suggests, the frong has red eyes with vertically narrowed pupils. It has a vibrant green body with yellow and blue vertically striped sides. Its webbed feet and toes are orange or red. The skin on the red-eyed tree frog's stomach is soft and fragile skin, whereas the back is thicker and rougher. Nature is freaking amazing.
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LOL
no fucks given
hahahahaa! what a cutie
and I sure as he'll don't neither
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Ait Ben Haddou Kasbah
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Agathis borneensis - Borneo kauri, Malayan kauri, Western dammar, Dammar minyak (Malay)
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