ufosfootage
10+ Views

Military Plane Chases UFO And Films It In Night Vision

Even when you think all the facts are in, UFO sightings still catch people off guard, was it a helicopter or was it a plane!

Turns out it was a plane chasing the UFO.

We had to dig deep on this one as it certainly caught us off guard as this is probably the best UFO video that we've seen!

So, you can understand how we wanted to get it right and present this well.
Guys, your probably looking at historic Ufology here.


Comment
Suggested
Recent
Cards you may also be interested in
Cosplaying while black: are we making our communities unsafe for nonwhite members?
It's all fun and games. Until it's not. I've mentioned Marvel's race problem before, but the truth is the problem is everywhere. There are very few positive representations of people of color in the media today. Some of this is because those in charge of casting, writing, and producing the media we love are almost all white. There are about three nonwhite people in America for every nonwhite character we see on screen, and of those characters, how many of them get screentime or character arcs that don't pidgeonhole them in a stereotype? If you don't think there's a problem, you might want to look again. These problems are psrt of fandom too. Since the media we're celebrating is flawed, it's extremely difficult for us to avoid internlizing the harmful messages that we consume. It's not somehing that can be done passively- it takes real work. Chaka Cumberbatch has been a cosplayer for years, and has been the target of harassment because she cosplays as characters that aren't black like- she is. It's not like she has a lot of options- how many black female characters can you name off the top of your head? Storm, Princess Tiana- she's built some amazing costumes for these characters. But why should Hollywood's diversity problem be hers? The underlying message feels very much like: "This isn't for you, you're not welcome here". Why would anyone want to send that kind of message to a fellow fan? In an interview with HaveYouNerd, she mentioned that even people who didn't overtly exclude her could sometimes make her feel like she didn't belong: "Sometimes, you’ll run into some tokenism, or people will start to get a little too comfortable with you – and it’s always painfully awkward because then it’s like you’re forced to walk this tightrope between sticking up for yourself and forcing the group to have an uncomfortable conversation about race, stereotypes, and why the things they’re saying are problematic. I’ve had times when I was hanging out with a group that was predominately male, that I was accused of “playing the race card,” “overreacting” or “taking things too seriously...” Fandom, we need to do better than this. We need to make our fellow fans of color feel like they're in a safe environment, where they can voice their discomfort and not have their feelings dismissed. Where they can come out and have fun and not worry about being tokenized or harassed. We get so enthusiastic over every new trailer release- why can't we show cosplayers of color the same enthusiasm? We freak out every time nerds are misrepresented in the media, but we can't be bothered to stand up for our fellows when they feel attacked or hurt? And before you say that it's "just about hurt feelings" (like feelings don't matter!?), consider this... On September 10th, 2014, Darren Hunt was shot and killed by the police. While the initial report suggested he had been "lunging towards officers", witnesses and the autopsy confirmed that he had in fact been going in the opposite direction. He was shot in the back. Furthermore,, he was still in costume from a character cosplay. He had a toy sword with him. The police shot an unarmed black man, and they blamed their mistake on his cosplay. Part of making our communities safer needs to include effort to make the WORLD we live in a safer place. It should never be acceptable for the police to recklessly commit homicide like this, but we've seen this story repeating over and over again. Darren Hunt was a fellow fan, but the silence from fan communities was deafening. We're fans. We love heroes in capes that swoop in to save the day when all hope is lost. It's an escape. The thing about escaping into fantasies (like we do with films and comics and tv shows), is that all the problems of the real world follow us there. As nerds and as fans, we have no excuse when we ignore the very real problems our fellows face because of their race (or their gender, their sexuality, or the size of their bodies). Silently ignoring the problem, or taking a "neutral" stance does nothing to help the people endangered by racism. All it does is give more power to those whose actions are deliberately harmful. We as fans need to do so much more to make our communities safer. We need to educate ourselves. We need to demand more diverse guests and panels at our conventions, vocalize your support for fans of color (not talking over them, but listening to their needs and adding your voice to theirs), support writers that are diversifying their work, and advocating for change when the systems that are supposed to be protecting us are applying uneven, brutal force against people of color. We need to listen. If you're still scratching your head, just ask yourself: what would my favorite hero do?
Mobile Phone Photography with Dima Gavrysh
If anyone tells you that a real photographer can't use a mobile phone camera to take pictures, tell them they are wrong. Any device that captures an image can be used in photography, and any of these devices can create (subjectively) beautiful imagery. Dima Gavrysh is a photographer who has mastered the use of his mobile phone camera in his work. Dima has been embedded with the US Army in Afghanistan documenting and creating projects such as Soldiers of Zerok and Inshallah (pictured). He approaches the subject matter of war with an outstanding ability to capture the tension and charge of the experience with an artist's eye. Dima has produced many compelling series involving this subject in collaboration with charitable organizations such as Doctors Without Borders. Dima's project Inshallah explores the romanticization of war that intertwines with his personal experiences growing up in Ukraine. Here is was Dima says about the project: "Inshallah (God willing in Arabic) is a project that explores the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan, and draws on my childhood fantasies that romanticize the military and intertwine with my past and present personal conflicts I create a dark fairytale filled with my fears and dreams, based on my fascination with the army’s strength and order, set on the front lines of what has become America’s longest running war in history. Mesmerized by the complexity of the Afghan chaos, I strive to better comprehend my personal relationship to these wars: two empires, two mentalities, same battlefield, twelve years apart.."
LGBT Pride Playlist
In light of the tragedy in Orlando, I want to make sure that everyone in this community regardless of your sexual orientation, your religious beliefs, or your political opinions, knows that you're loved. Everyone deserves to love and be loved, to live their lives how they wish, and to feel safe being themselves. Here are a few songs of encouragement, and I hope that anyone affected (which, really, should be all Americans) find peace. Amber - Borders Stand up, fall down, up again Up against the pressure I am in Slowly but surely I begin Jumping trains ‘cause I know I can win I know there’s a plan So thick the fog but I know I can trust The feelings that I feel when the roads rough Park Jungmin - Not Alone I can believe I’m not alone Not alone now, not sad anymore and I can feel it I’m not alone Definitely not alone, never be exhausted again Song Jieun - Don't Look At Me Like That Don’t look at me like that We’re just in love, that’s all Don’t hate on us, however you’re viewing us We’re just a little different Just leave us alone Can’t we live in a world where time stands still? Why? Why not? We did nothing wrong Why? Why not? We’re so in love Ailee - Heaven You taught me love in this harsh world I am happy with you alone Heaven Heaven Heaven Heaven Heaven If we're together we will never cry never never cry Heaven Heaven Heaven Heaven Heaven Forever, together never gonna be alone BTS - Save Me Listen to my heartbeat It calls you whenever it wants to Because within this pitch black darkness You are shining so brightly Go spread love today, and every day.
Ignorant Shaming of Our Veterans
Attention: Women can be veterans, too. The following story is just another lesson as to why you should never make generalizations: On Monday, when Rebecca Landis Hayes parked her car in a veterans-only parking spot in Concord, North Carolina, she returned to her car to find a very nasty note. This parking is for Veterans, lady. Learn to read and have some respect. But here's the thing: Landis is a veteran. She served eight years in the US Navy. She had every right to park in that spot. Talk about a very sexist, epic fail. Landis responded to this incident with a perfectly worded post on Facebook: To the person who left this note on my windshield today at the Coddle Creek Harris Teeter in Concord, NC: I know I parked in one of the Veteran Parking spaces today, it was hot. I had been in and out of my car several times already this afternoon, and I was only going to be a minute. Besides, the parking lot was full, so I just did it. It was the first time, and I won’t do it again. I’m sorry... I’m sorry that you can’t see my eight years of service in the United Sates Navy. I’m sorry that your narrow misogynistic world view can’t conceive of the fact that there are female Veterans. I’m sorry that I have to explain myself to people like you. Mostly, I’m sorry that we didn’t get a chance to have this conversation face to face, and that you didn’t have the integrity and intestinal fortitude to identify yourself, qualities the military emphasizes. Which leads to one question, I served, did you? Indeed, someone probably should’ve informed the person who left that note that there are over 2 million female veterans all over the US. They are just as deserving of respect and recognition as their fellow male veterans. Thank you veterans, of all genders, races, and creeds.
3
Comment
Share