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To Vinglers: Thank You For Your Strength and Compassion
Vingle is a place to connect with people who love the things that you love. Many Vinglers have become best friends and in a few cases, they've become like family. Recently, the Vingle community was shocked by news of a fellow Vingler @BBxGD's illness. Rather than despairing or falling silent, the Vingle Kpop community's response was absolutely incredible. Hundreds of messages, comments, and cards were written cheering for @BBxGD and offering her support and positivity. When a large group of Vinglers organized a social media campaign to ask Korean entertainers to send encouragement, Vingle did whatever they could to help. Vingle reached out to Big Bang's Taeyang to let him know how brave @BBxGD has been during this tough time, and how incredibly loving and supporting our Vingle community is. He was touched and, wanting to offer his prayers and support, was kind enough to send @BBxGD a personal message and CD. Taeyang asked us to send these to @BBxGD from Korea. We hope this little gift will give her more positive energy and power to get over her illness and recover fast. This is a testament to not only @BBxGD's strength as a person but to how truly loving the Vingle family is. This could never have happened without the support from the Vingle community. The entire Vingle Team was moved by the kindness that was shown, and we are so proud to be the platform of such a caring community. Now we ask all of Vingle to take a moment to send love and positive thoughts towards @BBxGD. Thank you, Vinglers and stay strong, @BBxGD!
How to Deal with Anti-Fans Online
We've been seeing a lot of "Kpop fans" kicking up some hate* on social media and I'd like to enlist the help of Vingle's guardian angel Choi Minho to remind us how to deal with them. Minho, if you please: 1. Do NOT Engage. Do not respond to them. That is exactly what they want. Even if they directly reply to you, DO NOT ANSWER THEM. I know they're infuriating and you want to shut them down, but it never ever works. Think of it like a forest fire, if they have stuff to burn the fire will keep growing. Take away their fuel and they'll die off. 2. Flood the thread. Bury the hate under positivity. Send messages of love and praise and hope, to get rid of the hate, anger, and rudeness. Its so much more fun to watch them get frustrated by your sweet messages (not directed at them, direct them at the person they're attacking!) rather than getting in a fight with them. 3. Watch Your Work Pay Off Slowly you see the haters back away and you can pat yourself and your fellow fans on the back for a job well done. Voila! Keep up the good work Vinglers and fight the good fight! * I would, however, like to mention that pointing out and not supporting your faves’ problematic aspects DOES NOT MAKE YOU ANY LESS OF A FAN BUT MAKES YOU AN ENGAGED AND AWARE CONSUMER. What’s the point of being a fan if you’re not a critical one? What’s the point of absorbing media without the intention of analyzing it? If the argument is a constructive one, then don't write off any random person not wholeheartedly supporting a kpop artist as a "hater" :)
'Train to Busan' as Critique of Korean Society
I still haven't been able to see Train to Busan for myself, but I found this article on NPR to be really interesting! It doesn't ruin any plot points (other than the fact that there is a zombie apocalypse which I'm pretty sure we could gather from the trailer...) According to the article: Without giving too much of the story away, the film blames corporate callousness for the death toll. The government covers up the truth — or is largely absent. And the crew? Rather than rescue passengers, it follows the wishes of a businessman. Sewol Ferry Reference: These themes are particularly resonant in South Korea, which in 2014 faced national tragedy after 300 people, mostly teenagers, died when a ferry overturned in the sea. Investigators found the ferry's corporate owners overloaded it to save money. And the captain and crew got into lifeboats without rescuing passengers. News media, toeing the government line, originally reported that everyone survived, blamed rescuers for not working hard enough (when in reality the government refused to let them go into the water and rescue the children), etc. The Korean president's whereabouts on that day are still unexplained. Then the MERS Outbreak: Last year, as Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, spread in South Korea, the government wouldn't share key information about where patients were being treated, where it started, and how officials would contain the outbreak. The government refused to communicate with the public, so the Seoul mayor had to go against the president and form his OWN plan to fix the problem. As a result, he's now in the running for next president (since Koreans have lost all respect or trust in the current pres) You can read the full piece by NPR right HERE. Has anyone seen this yet?!