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'Train to Busan' as Critique of Korean Society
I still haven't been able to see Train to Busan for myself, but I found this article on NPR to be really interesting! It doesn't ruin any plot points (other than the fact that there is a zombie apocalypse which I'm pretty sure we could gather from the trailer...) According to the article: Without giving too much of the story away, the film blames corporate callousness for the death toll. The government covers up the truth — or is largely absent. And the crew? Rather than rescue passengers, it follows the wishes of a businessman. Sewol Ferry Reference: These themes are particularly resonant in South Korea, which in 2014 faced national tragedy after 300 people, mostly teenagers, died when a ferry overturned in the sea. Investigators found the ferry's corporate owners overloaded it to save money. And the captain and crew got into lifeboats without rescuing passengers. News media, toeing the government line, originally reported that everyone survived, blamed rescuers for not working hard enough (when in reality the government refused to let them go into the water and rescue the children), etc. The Korean president's whereabouts on that day are still unexplained. Then the MERS Outbreak: Last year, as Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, spread in South Korea, the government wouldn't share key information about where patients were being treated, where it started, and how officials would contain the outbreak. The government refused to communicate with the public, so the Seoul mayor had to go against the president and form his OWN plan to fix the problem. As a result, he's now in the running for next president (since Koreans have lost all respect or trust in the current pres) You can read the full piece by NPR right HERE. Has anyone seen this yet?!
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You'll Never Guess What People Eat At The Movies Across The Globe
Yuck. There are hundreds of countries around the world sitting in movie theaters across the globe. One big difference is the food they eat while in the audience. From dried bugs to salted candies, world customs really have their own distinct palette. Though Americans believe there's nothing in the world that could be better than a nice bag full of buttery popcorn, they are in for a huge surprise. Check out the movie theater snacks from around the world. You're going to be shocked. USA: Salted, Buttery, Popcorn It's crunchy. It's addicting. It's SO American. Popcorn is a very traditional snack without a ton of calories...that is, if you don't drench it in a pool of butter and salt. Popcorn has had a long standing reservation in our culture, primarily since corn is such in abundance within our country. We've muti-purposed corn to be just about anything but popcorn is still our favorite creation. Just remember, a small popcorn won't get you through intermission. A large popcorn will make you feel fat. But who cares, right? Great Britain: Sugared Popcorn Why am I not surprised that Great Britain would have a seamlessly more proper snack? Compared to American, the Brits always seem to do the exact opposite. From my personal view, I just don't understand the thrill of sugary popcorn. However then again, kettle corn and caramel corn is a huge success in the States. Brits are notorious for their bitter drinks such as coffee and tea paired with a very decadent and sweet dessert. I guess it's only fitting, pinkies up. Japan: Iwashi Senbei The first idea that popped into your mind was probably not that these are sardine rice crackers. The crisps are baked in sugar and soy sauce to give them their distinct taste. Rice is a very traditional food within the country so it's no surprise it is a snack as well. And with Japan being a very dependent country on its seafood industry, it's obvious that a leading snack brand would be fish based. Still interesting. Brazil: Roasted Ants Okay GROSS. As an American, I will never understand the love for eating bugs. We get it, they are packed with a ton of protein and have a nice crunch. But it's so taboo in American culture. On the other hand, Brazilians loves them. It's an aphrodisiac, or food that stimulates sexual desire, which could be the reason for why Brazilians are such a fan. Talk about a passive aggressive way to show your date that you want to hook up. Norway: Dried Reindeer Meat Somewhere in the North Pole, Santa is crying. This food seems so fitting though for the region. Reindeer meat is cut and then dried for a chewy taste. Very similar to beef jerky in the States. Reindeer meat boasts very low fat and high protein. However, I can't seem to feel sympathy for Rudolph & his gang once they find out that the Norwegians are snacking on their friends. Guess Norway is going to become the land of misfits toys soon enough... South Korea: Dried Cuttlefish I guess this goes hand in hand with popcorn in the Asian nation. With a meaty texture and briny flavor, apparently South Koreans can't get enough. It can be seasoned in a variety of flavors. Though they're also fans of roasted chestnuts, dried cuttlefish still frequently comes out as the fan favorite. I still don't know what a cuttlefish is. Russia: Beluga Caviar This is reserved for the rich and only the rich but a very common wealthy delicacy. Though the average folk may not be accustomed to eating the beluga caviar themselves, they know exactly who is receiving it when they attend the movie theater. Apparently movies in Russia are a more fancy affair, something Americans and other world countries would gawk at. With Russia being known to have extreme customs, this one tops the cake. Greece: Souvlaki Okay, this looks delicious. Lamb or beef souvlaki will be a fit for an Grecian attending an outdoor movie. They're tender and savory and it's already making my mouth water. Grecians are notorious for having the best food in the world and it's no surprise that their movie theaters also come with a wide delicious variety of choices. Please fly me to Greece because I'm starving. Netherlands: Salty Licorice This could be the most hated snack in America. Black licorice is a very distinct taste that very few people enjoy. In America, our black licorice contains a lot of sugar. However in the Netherlands, they salt their licorice with ammonium chloride which gives eaters a tongue-numbing sensation. Is this candy a drug? No thank you. India: Samosas This is my favorite. Look how good that looks! Bollywood theaters are all the rage in India far more popular than any Western movie. Samosas are potato stuffed pastries that taste as good as they look. With Bollywood movies comes a delicious combo of chutney and cheese sandwiches and vada pav, potato fritters in a bread bun. I could definitely ship this idea in the USA.
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