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LeBron James signs lifetime deal with Nike!
LeBron James will be "just doing it" with Nike for the rest of his life. Nike, who has been LeBron's official sponsor since he graduated from high school, announced that they have signed a "lifetime deal" with LeBron James. LeBron's first deal with Nike happened in May 2003 (7 years + $90 million). An anonymous source have revealed that LeBron's new deal "easily surpasses" Kevin Durant's $300 million deal that lasts for ten years. LeBron's deal is comparable to Nike's biggest endorser, Michael Jordan. Jordan's attorneys have revealed that MJ received $480 million from Nike between 2000 and 2012. Michael played his last NBA game in 2003. Unlike it's competitors, this is the first time Nike has signed a lifetime deal with an athlete. Adidas has famously (or infamously) signed a lifetime deal with injury-plagued Derrick Rose and Tracy McGrady. And Under Armour is on track with the 2015 NBA MVP, Stephen Curry. Well, do my sports fans think Nike, which is undoubtedly the number one sports brand in the world, made the right choice signing LeBron to a lifetime deal? @ButterflyBlu @superiorsl @Starbell808 @InPlainSight @jokes @BEAUTYgirlARIEL @David19Flo23 @karencorchado @salahabdalla @Moose892 @BrookieyElba @SamuelRodriguez @ValerieAlissaPa @xitlalicordova1 @AndrewMaldonado @Jovi @Shippudenguy21 @AbdulrahmanSaad @trinityarcangel @thefeels @Link4TW @ChriSingularis @sanazsanaz @WilliamBrown @DannyMoses @ClaySharko @Ravenwing92 @FromBlue2U @TravisBeck @LemissaNicole @BossDominata @gatorchick96 @MatthewBoughton @MarcusJiles @BrandonMcNeil @MalikLawary @KyleBerke @manbungo2000 @DerekGumtow @havic @Straightshooter @PhilAnthony @Kirooken @yaakattackk @RodneyYoung @DreJones @JonathanKerns @bnzattoni @TravisManning @GalacticChakra @smothgreen @afxs @johnnolastname @ChristopherKenn @ChasePage @coreywriley91@MikeWolf @MrTenThirty @JasonNilsson @BrunoDutch @SherzTYC @krishntejanand @addri @ChrisStephens @AniBreo @GinnaL13 @VeronicaArtino @mishthi @andwas @TomasVasquez @oct6eg10 @NimishMathur @Sydsocquet @Darlin972 @GingerMJones @starli @kyleatekwana @ALEXCAMACHO @GabrielaAlvarez @strawhatblakley @VadimUsach @BenjiPhilip @Silver925 @Eduardo14 @AshfakEjaaz @brolyxxrborn @FernandaMontalv @coreywriley91 @EmanueleYagoda @DennieySnyder @TiffanyPerez @ShoMoPayton @mackenzieorr186 @EvanYannetti @RaulGamboa
Can 'Crying Michael Jordan' get you sued?
The Crying Micheal Jordan Meme was by far one of the best things to come out of 2015. Social media kingpins relentlessly attack famous people across the globe at their weakest moments with a crying MJ meme centered around their latest blunder. It's pretty low, but I must say, it's pretty damn funny. "It just seems to have an appropriateness for so many different circumstances," said Andrew Selepak, director of the social media graduate program at the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communications. "That face can be used for a meme for a number of different levels, whether it's sports or non-sports related. But because of the passion people have for sports, I think it has legs like few other memes that have been popular in the past." It's had an amazing amount of staying power, and like most things that have this type of power, often comes dollars. So when money gets involved, who owns the rights to this? Could a person be sued over the Crying meme? The Associated Press could pursue legal action if it believes its copyright of the image has been violated. "We own the rights in our photo, which was taken in 2009," Associated Press spokesman Paul Colford wrote in an email to ESPN.com. "We could enforce those rights depending on the use and other factors, as is the case with all AP photos." Likewise, Jordan spokesperson Estee Portnoy recently implied that the basketball icon's camp is keeping a close eye on usage of the meme. "We haven't seen anyone using it to promote their commercial interests, which is something that we're monitoring," Portnoy wrote in an email to the Chicago Tribune. So be careful about letting loose a signature Crying Micheal Jordan meme, it could cost you some dollars down the line.
Steph Curry Broke The Way Video Games Are Made
I know that title seems a little hyperbolic but it's absolutely, 100% true. If you know anything about basketball or if you're friends with anyone who knows anything about basketball, then they probably talk about how much of a beast Steph Curry is on the court. He hits 3-pointers from way beyond the arc and he's consistent with it. And I can see the look on your face, you're like, "Paul what the fuck does this have to do with video games?" Well, Curry's performance this season (in real life) has just broken the way NBA2K builds their video games. In a recent interview with Forbes, Mike Wang (gameplay director of the NBA2K games) said, that they're "looking for new ways to translate his [Curry's] game into 2K". As an avid fan and player of the NBA2K games, I know first hand that they've come up with formulas and rules for the game so the game feels like a realistic basketball game. In the most recent iteration, shot selection is a big factor in making shots. But -- if you watch Curry play -- his shot selection is, sometimes, insane. But that doesn't translate to the video game, like, at all. ESPN even ran an article titled, "Real-life Stephen Curry is better than video-game Stephen Curry" which compares Curry's real stats to simulated video game stats and Steph Curry in real life does consistently better than the video game version of him. And it seems like the next iteration of the NBA2K series will have some careful consideration when they start designing the way Curry plays in-game. If you watch the first minute of the video above (which is from a game that just happened a couple of days ago), you'll see Curry make a 3-point shot with two defenders on him. If you were to do this in NBA2K as Steph Curry, you'd most likely miss. It's insane to me that because of his skill, the people that work on 2K have to develop new ways to deal with his on-court skill. It's kind of insane (and awesome and amazing) to me that Stepch Curry is better than an artificial version of himself who, by all means, should be better. Mostly because it's an AI that doesn't get tired or have thoughts or anything else like that. It's kind of breathtaking, to be honest. And I'm sort of happy to be alive during this sports-historic moment in time. All of that being said, I guess the color-commentators need to stop comparing Curry's skill to something that's "video game-like" instead of saying it's unbelievable because, well, the best basketball video game (and its developer) can't believe it either.