keshie
1,000+ Views

A peek into Ubud’s hidden rooms

With its plethora of accommodation choices, it is not too hard to find the perfect place to stay during your Ubud getaway. Most of the time, staying in Ubud means keeping away from the bustling crowd of the coastal towns in southern Bali. If that is the case, private villas available in Ubud would be the best choice for your lodgings. The Jakarta Post Travel picks five villas that best represent the various types of uniquely built accommodations in Ubud. Each offers different experiences that are often missing from the generic type of villas built by big chain hotels. These are our choices: 1. Fivelements Puri Ahimsa – a healing and wellness retreat. Located the furthest from Ubud’s central area, Fivelements is the perfect place to attain tranquility – an essential condition for a wellness retreat. Another nice aspect of Fivelements’ location is its close proximity to the Ayung River, filling each room in the resort with the hypnotizingly calm sound of the river. With the structure built from bamboo materials on 10,000 square meters of lush grassland, you can feel the natural harmony that Fivelements is trying to achieve. Large indoor and outdoor spaces are available for you to conduct your healing routines. The place offers flexible programs for you to experience, from a quick three-night retreat to a 21-night-long healing journey guaranteed to make you feel like new again. Great for travelers looking to recharge themselves, either through your own method of replenishment and detoxification, or just by letting the place do the magic for you. Banjar Baturning, Mambal Phone: +62.361.469206 Fax: +62.361.469822 2. Pandawas Villas – living the epic tale. The name “Pandawas” is not something that this villa uses for some shallow Balinese image – it means much more than that. In fact, the whole place is built with a design and philosophy based on the tale of the Pandawa brothers, who waged war against the evil Korawas in the ancient epic poem Mahabharata. In the villa, you will find a hall named after Arjuna, one of the Pandawas, and four other rooms named after his brothers: Yudistra, Bima, Sahadewa and Nakula. Each room is designed with similarities to the characteristics of its namesake. The Bima room, for example, is adorned with a white-and-grey checkered mural symbolizing the color of Bima's battle armor. Pandawas Villas is a really exclusive resort with only four lavish rooms available on a stunning 7,000-square-meter site. The communal layout of the place, with the rooms built close to each other, produces an engaging atmosphere while maintaining privacy at the same time, which is ideal when one wants to book the whole resort. “We have several celebrities who have booked all the rooms during their stay here,” villa owner Monica Mohindra said. Great for families who want to book several rooms altogether in a resort without having to be too separated from each other. Jl. Raya Kendran No.1 Banjar Kepitu, Tegallalang Phone: +62 361 971877 3. Chapung SeBali – romantic private getaway. Ubud is also famous for its green rice paddies, and Chapung SeBali takes advantage of that. This is not just for show, though, because the majority of vegetables served in the villas are homegrown products. Yet, when you take a peek at the rooms that they offer, you will see that Chapung SeBali manages to pull off a great blend between the beautiful natural environment of Ubud and the contemporary lifestyle of modern people, which creates a pleasant fusion of local tradition and urban living. Among the many non-chain villas in Ubud, Chapung SeBali is one of the rare few with direct access to pools next to the rooms. Furthermore, the famous rice paddies of Ubud are very close to gaze upon, right in front of your room, along with epic views of the river valley. With such great scenery, as well as the high walls that give you total privacy, it feels like you can just spend your time there without the need to leave your room. High-class service is also apparent in their culinary department as you will be treated to delicacies made by George, their chef from Greece who specializes in Mediterranean food. In short, Chapung SeBali gives you the same class that is offered by 5-star brands, such a great achievement for a villa nicely hidden away in Keliki village. Great for honeymooners who want to experience that luxurious feeling of having the world stand still in front of them. Jl. Raya Sebali Keliki, Ubud Phone: +62 361 8989102 4. KajaNe Mua & Yangloni – choosing sides By having two resorts built in Ubud, KajaNe gives you the flexibility to choose how far you want to be from the central area of Ubud. If you hate the thought of walking more than 20 minutes just to get to Ubud Market on Jl. Raya Ubud, it would be better to stay at KajaNe Mua at Jl. Monkey Forest – one of Ubud’s busiest streets. KajaNe Yangloni, on the other hand, would be more appropriate if you are looking for something further away with minimum traffic noise pollution. Either way, both places offer nice accommodation. KajaNe Mua is built with modern architecture overlooking the Campuhan river valley, while Yangloni will give you a great experience in their wooden villas with large rice paddy in the center of the complex. Great for those of you who have not made a decision on whether to stay in the center area of Ubud or not. The staff will be delighted to take you between the two villas so you can assess them better. Jl. Monkey Forest (KajaNe Mua) Jl. Raya Peliatan (KajaNe Yangloni) Phone: +62 361 972877, +62 361 972875 5. Bambu Indah – the ultimate escape to nature “They have traveled a long way [to get here], why would they want to watch TV?” said Bambu Indah manager Meliana Salim in response to my amazement at not seeing any televisions in any of the villas at Bambu Indah. Bambu Indah whole-heartedly embraces the “eco-friendly” concept by using wood and bamboo in most of its structures. Famous Asian top model who recently became a big endorser of green living, Nadya Hutagalung, personally recommended this place to The Jakarta Post Travel. You would be hard-pressed to find another place in Bali that could match Bambu Indah's natural buildings. Staying at Bambu Indah will give you the ultimate rustic experience of living in the forest. But, don’t worry, it is still a luxurious resort – air conditioners, hot-water baths and electricity are among its features. Aside from the environmentally conscious concept, Bambu Indah also happens to have the best location in Sayan village – on a cliff edge, overlooking magnificent rice paddies far across the Ayung River. Seeing the sunset from the villa's front porch is just heavenly. It may be one of the best sunset views in Bali. Great for those wanting to get as close as possible to nature. Banjar Baung, Sayan Village Phone: +62 361 977 922
2 Comments
Suggested
Recent
@nokcha yeah I think so too!
Whoa this is beautiful!
Cards you may also be interested in
Magnificent Madakaripura
If you don’t take a picture it never happened, or so it seems nowadays with the popularity of selfies and all and sundry owning a selfie stick. But with the popularity of most tourist sites it’s hard to get a composition that doesn’t include someone in the background. However, Madakaripura falls provides an all-natural backdrop without another soul for miles. Dubbed as the final meditation place of Gajah Mada, the elephant general of the Majapahit Empire, a visit to the misty, streaming falls is the ideal post-Mount Bromo excursion: It offers a much less strenuous experience than climbing up the 250 steps to the sulfur caldera. The falls are located roughly 35 kilometers from Bromo near a village called Sapih and can be reached via Jl. Raya Bromo to Lumbang on the way to Probolinggo. It is a pleasant ride — ideally on motorcycle — on which you will find yourself unconsciously pressing the brakes as the villages you pass on the snaking mountainous roads are enshrouded in lush and equally mesmerizing greenery. Five kilometers away from the waterfall’s parking lot a man will appear from what seems to be a bus stop and will charge the entrance fee of Rp 3,000 (3 US cent). A narrow dirt road flanked by banana and durian trees along with casuarina and some colorful apiaries will lead you to another “check point” which is unchecked and abandoned with a permanently raised barrier. From there, it is another kilometer to the stall-laden parking lot with a statue of the great Gajah Mada in the lotus position and an empty fountain sitting dryly right in the middle of it. Be assertive and be on your guard. No sooner than alighting and touts will hound you. The trail however is quite visible making the falls easily accessible. A guide is in fact not necessary but if you choose one — or passively allow one to latch on to you — the cost will range anywhere from Rp 100,000. There have been instances of groups being charged over Rp 400,000, an outrageous price especially for a local doing nothing more than hold your hand when crossing the river. Negotiating is as advisable as bringing common sense since the area is still wild and mildly challenging to get through. You may have to cross the river about five times in total so proper footwear is essential as some rocks are deceivingly slippery. En route you will also encounter a number of stalls selling fried bananas, kopi panas (hot coffee) and tempeh (fermented soya bean cake) as well as hawkers selling ponchos for the stretch of trail which is rained on by bigger streams of cold and refreshing water. Do bring your own raincoat, unless you don’t mind getting drenched and riding home using the wind as your natural blow dryer. After a kilometer trek you will find yourself wading anywhere from shin-deep ripples to a mid-chest pool before getting to the lagoon, the hidden reward for your hard work. This last step requires clambering over a crest of rocks. There, the 200 meter-high waterfalls reveals itself in full showing how the canyon is really like a special chamber of sorts of all things natural. Apart from the several waterfall cascades, when light pours in at the appropriate time of day it illuminates the basin making the cliff’s fauna even brighter and more vibrant in color. The rushing water makes it difficult to hear and the large boulders lining the river are reminiscent of dinosaur eggs. It isn’t recommended to visit during the wet season as the water gets pretty muddy and the risk of flooding and landslides are much greater. Though we didn’t see any macaque monkeys, I heard that in fact it’s a good thing—they sometimes toss rocks off the cliff’s edge. But don’t worry, helmets are not required and if they were, I’m sure there would be several hawkers renting them out for a nominal fee. Finding yourself away from the frenzy of shutter-pressing tourists will make you really appreciate the pristine waterfalls and the feeling of being like Indiana Jones trekking right into the heart of the jungle. Crossing barefoot a river and pushing through branches sticking out into the pathway, your only obstacle to good times and people-free selfies!
Why Do You Choose a Private Transfer from Rome to Capri?
How is your vacation going on in Italy? Getting the most out of your time with friends and family? Each and everything is perfect if your trip goes well. You’re having fun and unwinding yourself with the near and dear ones. The more you visit the more you explore. You would really like to see the most part of the places Italy is famed for. Maybe you’re at Positano, Ravello, Sorrento, and Naples or could be on the Amalfi Coast. You would like to explore the Capri Island that you’ve been listening to all the time – it’s stunning and magnificent. Well, are you heading to Capri Island? You can take a private transfer from Rome to Capri. Otherwise, you can prefer to hire airport transfer from Naples to Capri Island. No matter whatever the option you wish to go with, your visit to Capri Island with your family will be a memorable one for sure. But, how is it possible? We have the perfect guide for you and will take this opportunity to provide you the chance to do it on the sea!! Still, not convinced? Please check out this blog. Why Choose a Private Transfer to Capri Island? A private transfer from Rome to Capri can be a great option to discover the splendid delights of Capri Island. Upon booking your transfer service, you will be led by highly qualified English speaking skipper who will allow you to get the most out of your experience. Capri Island is one of the picturesque islands in the Gulf of Naples, located just opposite of the Sorrentine Peninsula. Situated just a short distance away from the chaos of the city, the island offers a full package of magical landscapes and beautiful views. However, the panorama of Capri Island is famous all across the world and its nightlife is simply magnificent. This means, visiting this island through airport transfer from Naples to Capri, you will have a great experience but what you could see from a boat it’s completely different. The spectacles you will admire during your excursion to reach Capri Island include different taste and they will leave you with an unforgettable memory at the end of the day. Also, you will have some beautiful photographs of your journey – which will tell the unique story of your boat excursion to access Capri Island. Rest assured that, your private transfer from Rome to Capri will be planned perfectly, including a scheduled pickup from your hotel, airport, port, train station or every other place you may need. You will be provided with a private expert driver and experience the journey with all the comforts. Conclusion – Still, you’re thinking? Or counting how many of your family and friends you have to take? You might’ve got your list and planned your vacation in Capri Island. It’s time to book your airport transfer from Naples to Capri through Napoli Limo Service and we’ll handle all of your transportation needs. Don’t hesitate to contact us today for any special request, if you’ve any! Capri Island with its magnificent landscapes is waiting for you to live them!! Don’t miss this chance for a wonderful Mediterranean Sea experience with Napoli Limo Service!! Please stay connected with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus social networks.
10 best new hotels of 2014
Over the last 12 months, many incredible hotels have opened around the world and HotelsCombined recently shared its favorites based on factors such as location, uniqueness of amenities and quality of service. The end result is a phenomenal group of castles, beach retreats and architectural wonders; including one in Bali. The Castle Hotel, Dalian, China Perched atop Lianhua Mountain and overlooking the Yellow Sea, this imposing chateau conveniently provides 292 guest rooms, a spa, fitness center, indoor pool, several restaurants and a “royal cellar” with a micro-brewery. For those really looking to splash out, the 6,674 square foot Presidential Suite has a marble entrance, a dining room for 10, a full-service pantry and a waterfront balcony. Shangri-La at the Shard, London Opened in May, this first UK property of Shangri-La is housed within the 34th to 52nd floors of London’s iconic Shard skyscraper - the tallest building in Europe - and thus offers spectacular city views. Other highlights include a champagne bar, an infinity sky pool on the 52nd floor and an enviable location in the heart of the London Bridge Quarter. citizenM Times Square, New York City Trendy and colorful, this US debut of the citizenM hotel chain is perfectly situated within walking distance of many famous New York sites, including the Rockefeller Centre, the theater district and Central Park. Other perks include the rooftop bar and free in-room screening of the latest movies. With starting price at US$199 per night, it is also a real bargain for Midtown Manhattan. Pikaia Lodge, Galapagos Islands Located on Santa Cruz Island, in the center of the Galapagos archipelago, Pikaia Lodge is an eco-friendly retreat set on top of an extinct volcano crater. Close to a number of major wildlife sites and pristine beaches, the property offers a range of guided excursions and its own private Tortoise Reserve, with facilities including a spa and an infinity pool. Cromlix House, Scotland Owned by tennis superstar Andy Murray, this elegant Victorian mansion provides a peaceful countryside escape. Evoking the grand estates of yesteryear, the manor is furnished in Scottish antiques and onsite activities in the sprawling grounds include tennis (naturally), clay pigeon shooting, fishing, falconry and archery. Sofitel So Singapore Housed in a heritage building near Raffles Place, the Sofitel So’s décor - which includes elements designed by Karl Lagerfield himself – features a 19th century French style with a contemporary twist. Special touches here include in-room iPad minis, a gold-tiled rooftop infinity pool and complimentary mini bar drinks. Alila Jabal Akhdar, Oman Nestled within the Al Hajar mountain range, this serene retreat is surrounded by a stunning natural landscape teeming with caves, valleys, flowers, fruit trees and heritage sites (including the UNESCO-protected Bahla Fort). Guests can take a dip in the heated outdoor infinity pool overlooking the breathtaking gorge below or, for those who prefer, the villas have private terraces with plunge pools. Ace Hotel, Los Angeles This funky new LA abode plays an important part in the city’s cultural legend – housed within the historic United Artists building, the tower was once a movie studio and theater hub for independent artists. Today, it’s a stylishly renovated getaway where an in-room extra perk might include an acoustic guitar. Yemaya Island Hideaway, Nicaragua A tropical getaway, Yemaya offers up to 16 eco-friendly cabanas. Visitors to this retreat on Little Corn Island are encouraged to laze about in a hammock, enjoy a relaxing yoga session, sip on a cocktail at the beachside bar, partake in a variety of water sports, tuck into an organic meal at the onsite restaurant, or simply enjoy indulgent spa treatment. The Sarasvati Luxury Collection Resort, Bali Located in the exotic Seminyak and vibrant Legian areas, this resort offers guests direct access to the beach and upscale retail shops. The sunsets are gorgeous and there are activities for everybody; try a round of golf, mountain biking, go skydiving or relax with some fishing. For first-time visitors, the sacred Sangeh Monkey Forest and the famous scenic drive to Lake Bratan are great options. - See more at: http://www.jakpost.travel/news/10-best-new-hotels-of-2014-Wcd9aZUTOg1VFnhp.html#sthash.l9pepRf9.dpuf
The Works of Dale Chihuly The Atlantis Collection
ABOVE - A detail of "The Crystal Gate" installation in the Atlantis Resort, Nassau, The Bahamas. Dale Chihuly is a blown glass designer/sculptor whose works are considered unique to the field of blown glass, "moving it into the realm of large-scale sculpture". His works are legendary in the realm of art glass and he is considered a modern master through his mixing of traditional glass blowing techniques (learned in Venice Italy) and new techniques he’s developed to create works of mind-blowing intricacy and scale. Since a serious car accident in 1976 left him blinded in one eye and a body surfing accident in 1979 left him unable to hold the glass blowing pipe. He has since hired others to do the manual labor in bringing his designs to life. He calls himself “more of a choreographer than a dancer… more of a supervisor than a participant… more a director than an actor.” His large installations are on display in permanent collections all over the world, including in the United States, Canada, England, Singapore, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, and Nassau, the Bahamas at the Atlantis Resort. ABOVE - A detail of "The Crystal Gate" installation in the Atlantis Resort, Nassau, The Bahamas. The challenges in shooting such amazing works of art are many: SCALE - These massive installations are so large and complex that to capture the truly amazing detail and unique beauty of each you really need to shoot close-up images. The scale is then lost. But to shoot wide to establish each work in the environment they were places (designed for), you loose the finer details that make these works so awe inspiring. I knew when I was booked to shoot a corporate event in the Atlantis that the four large Chihuly installations were top of my list for my own "must shoot" items for the trip. I'd seen wide photo after wide photo and once on site and standing in amazement at their complexity and detail I decided to shoot long and tight - opting to not focus on scale so much as detail but knowing that certain angles would convey the size of their settings and therefore express their monumental size. LOCATION - These works of art are the show pieces of the busiest part of the resort, the casino. There isn't a time day or night that these works of art are not surrounded by people. Having the time to set up a shot and take it would be difficult. LOCATION - Because photography in the casino proper is not allowed, I was limited to the angles I could select. This meant going for my 300mm f/2.8 lens - large, heavy, and in need of some sort of support (i.e. tripod or monopod). It wasn't going to be possible to stop in a busy walkway and set up a tripod - so I decided to experiment with hand-held shots. LOCATION - Again, because of the location I couldn't increase shutter speed with the use of a speedlight. Flash photography was strictly prohibited inside the resort. The areas these installations occupied were dimly lit, which worked to the advantage of their display (since they are all internally lit), but with large lenses you have the hand-held rule of photography - if you don't want blur from the lens shaking you must shoot the second equivalent of the total focal length of the lens. Meaning I had to shoot at 1/350 second or higher to keep from having shake/blur in the images from holding that massive lens hand-held. I adjusted ISO to compensate and I used anything I could to steady my body/arms as I hoisted 12lbs of camera and lens up to get my shots. ABOVE -At the main entrance of the Atlantis Casino, "The Crystal Gate" installation stands 18 feet tall. Made of individual crystal glass shafts (3,100 to be exact), it is an amazing work of beauty as well as being a feat of design and engineering. Weighing over 30,000 pounds, it simply is an astoundingly beautiful and complex sculpture. Chihuly Atlantis Exhibits – Dale Chihuly was commissioned by the owner and builder of The Atlantis to make four grand statement works for the casino. Each is insured for over a million US dollars, they are all uniquely individual yet collectively appropriate for the design and theme of the Atlantis's main casino. The Crystal Gate - The Crystal Gate is a glittering tower of crystal soaring nearly 20 feet into the air at the entrance to the Atlantis Casino weighing 30,000 pounds and is made of 3,100 hand-blown crystals. It is the grand statement piece as you enter the casino – a marvel of crystal shapes and forms. It was by far my favorite piece, the pure scale and ambition of it spoke to me. I took dozens of photos of it and each angle reveals a new character and symmetry. ABOVE - The Temple of the Moon rests atop a large elevated platform. It sits opposite the casino from The Temple of the Sun. Between the two in the center of the room, suspended from the ceiling, is the Seaform Chandelier. Temple of the Moon & The Temple of the Sun - The challenge was to bring beauty to paradise -- and the Sun and Moon. Chihuly was commissioned to make dazzling yet approachable sculpture for the new Atlantis Resort Hotel on Paradise Island in the Bahamas. SPECIAL NOTE - Having the ability to step OUTSIDE the casino and shoot a photo such as the one above is one of the many reasons why I will ALWAYS travel with a super-telephoto lens. Having a 300, 400, 500, or 600mm lens available makes shots like the one above a reality. ABOVE - The Temple of the Moon – Each of the surface "plates" of the Temple of the Moon in itself is an amazing work of art. Cobalt blue mixes with silverish white and translucent blues to create a soothing and symmetrical opposite to the Temple of the Sun across the casino. “I knew I could create the sun very successfully, but the moon would have to somehow be blown and constructed in an entirely original way. I knew it would be difficult and force me to make something new.” ~ Dale Chihuly Beautifully rendered relief paintings of the twelve signs of the zodiac circle the Sun and Moon installations. BELOW - The dynamic and explosive colors and design of the Temple of the Sun are indeed a striking contrast to the relaxing and calming coolness of the Temple of the Moon. Temple of the Sun – The Temple of the Sun is a giant ball of flame-like tentacles of yellow, orange, and red elements radiating from its globe. It resembles a fearsome underwater creature of beauty and mystery while at the same time it could also easily be said that it is a representation of the violence and danger that reaches out from the center of every star into space. The Temple of the Sun has more than 2,300 yellow, orange, and red elements radiating from a fiery globe atop a replica of a Mayan temple. AND THEN THERE WAS THE SEA - BELOW - In the center of the room, caught between the two extremes of the sun and moon rests the Seaform Chandelier. The Seaform Chandelier – Featuring 900 unique hand blown elements depicting a wide assortment of ocean life in abstract form; this stunning 12ft diameter glass sculpture is located in the center of the Bacarat Lounge within sight of the two massive “Temple” sculptures. It features a number of instantly recognizable ocean shapes such starfish and then flows into shapes reminiscent of dolphins and other aquatic life. It is also an interesting "buffer" between the two extremes of the Temples. There are hints of gold and reds found in the Temple of the Sun, and cooler whites and bluish grey found in the Temple of the Moon. BELOW - In and around the casino are numerous smaller Chihuly works known as Macchia Bowls. Macchia Bowls - Derived from the Latin macula, the Italian word “macchia” connotes simply a stain or a spot, but it has a much richer range of meaning. Since the Renaissance, macchia has been associated with a sketchy way of applying the initial color to a drawing or painting. Particularly appropriate for the late style of the Venetian painter Titian, the word characterizes his emphasis on brushwork and summary treatment of form. In the seventeenth century, macchia designated the special quality of improvisational sketches that appear to be nature’s miraculous creation rather than mere human work. When Chihuly appropriates the term “Macchia” for his series, he gives back to the word some of its traditional meanings, particularly the emphasis on spontaneity, on artistic collaboration with technique rather than mere control of it. There is an undeniable sense of continuity and purpose to the master works on display at the Atlantis. Each piece although completely unique in design, shape, and color, flows into the next as a collective series should. Each alone is breathtaking and awe inspiring; but together they are an experience. The Atlantis is a destination without question, but the entire island of Nassau offers a unique treasure of culture and history that should not be missed if you ever have the chance to visit. For me, the chance to experience these beautiful installations in person and then be challenged in attempting to capture their beautify in photographs was one of the many highlights of my trip. © Copyright 2011-2015, Jon Patrick Hyde, All Rights Reserved.
The Lionfish (Pterois)
During my 7 day visit to the Caribbean island of Nassau I spent my spare time shooting photos of the island and the Atlantis Resort (where I was staying). What I found most interesting about the Atlantis was the impressive number of aquarium exhibits and their integration into the resort's design. There are catacombs and hidden walking paths all which lead to little coves or underwater chambers where you can view a stunning array of exotic ocean life. I quickly found that my 50mm f/1.4 lens was my best friend. It offered the best choice for the environment for many of the displays were tightly interwoven into the architecture of the resort; instead of large areas which would be better suited to a wide angle lens the Atlantis offers small intimate viewing locations. Finding the right mix of focal length and low-light ability - the f/1.4 50mm lens really outperformed all of my other lenses for capturing the marine life in these exhibits. ONE EXHIBIT THAT I FOUND PARTICULARLY BEAUTIFUL TO PHOTOGRAPH WAS THE LIONFISH HABITAT. Because the lighting was perfect to minimize reflections on the viewing window's surface and the habitat itself was colorful and bright, these beautifully dangerous looking creatures really photographed well. Wanting to understand more about what a Lionfish was, I decided to do some research. They are actually fascinating fish. HERE IS WHAT I LEARNED - Pterois is a genus of venomous marine fish, commonly known as Lionfish. The Lionfish is also called Zebrafish, Firefish, Turkeyfish or Butterfly-cod, is an unmistakably striking creature due to conspicuous warning coloration in red, white, creamy, or black bands, showy pectoral fins, and venomous spiky fins. There are 9 different sub-species of Pterois with each sharing common traits such as their venomous spiky fins and stripped coloration. Pterois range from 5 to 45 cm (2.0 to 17.7 in) in length, weighing from 0.025 to 1.3 kg (0.055 to 2.866 lb). Pterois species can live from five to 15 years and have complex courtship and mating behaviors. The lionfish is a predator and it aggressively preys on small fish and invertebrates. They can be found around the seaward edge of reefs and coral, in lagoons, and on rocky surfaces to 150ft (50m) deep. They show a preference for inshore areas and in harbors, and have a generally hostile attitude and are territorial towards other reef fish. Many universities in the Indo-Pacific have documented reports of Pterois aggression towards divers and researchers. Lionfish are known for their venomous fin rays, an uncommon feature among marine fish. These are primarily defensive tools used to keep larger predators from successfully attacking the Lionfish. The potency of their venom makes them a serious potential threat to fishermen and divers. In humans, Pterois venom can cause systemic effects such as extreme pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, breathing difficulties, convulsions, dizziness, redness on the affected area, headache, numbness, paresthesia (pins and needles), heartburn, diarrhea, and sweating. Rarely, such stings can cause temporary paralysis of the limbs, heart failure, and even death. Fatalities are common in very young children, the elderly, those with a weak immune system, or those who are allergic to their venom. Their venom is rarely fatal to healthy adults, but some species have enough venom to produce extreme discomfort for a period of several days. Pterois venom is a danger to allergic victims as they may experience anaphylaxis, a serious and often life-threatening condition that requires immediate emergency medical treatment. Severe allergic reactions include chest pain, severe breathing difficulties, a drop in blood pressure, swelling of the tongue, sweating, runny nose, or slurred speech. Such reactions can be fatal if not treated. There have been cases where humans were stung but the Lionfish did not release venom into the wound, suggesting that they can control if venom is injected or not. Most accidents happen to fishermen when they inadvertently catch a Lionfish in their nets. AS THEIR NAME SUGGESTS - LIONFISH ARE DEADLY HUNTERS According to a study that involved the dissection of over 1,400 lionfish stomachs, Pterois prey mostly on small fish, invertebrates, and mollusks in large amounts, with some specimens’ stomachs containing up to six different species of prey. Lionfish are skilled hunters, using specialized bilateral swim bladder muscles to provide exquisite control of location in the water column, allowing the fish to alter its center of gravity to better attack prey. The lionfish then spreads its large pectoral fins and swallows its prey in a single motion. They blow jets of water while approaching prey. The theory behind the blowing of these jets is to disorient their prey making it easier to catch. Indigenous to the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific regions – two of the nine species of Pterois, the Red Lionfish (P. volitans) and the Common Lionfish (P. miles), have established themselves as significant invasive species off the East Coast of the United States and in the Caribbean. They have been described as "one of the most aggressively invasive species on the planet". The Lionfish invasion is considered to be one of the most serious recent threats to Caribbean and Florida coral reef ecosystems according to a 2015 report by NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) in the United States. The red Lionfish was likely first introduced off the Florida coast by the early to mid-1990s. This introduction may have occurred in 1992 when Hurricane Andrew destroyed an aquarium in southern Florida, releasing six Lionfish into Biscayne Bay. Another theory is that the Lionfish may have been purposefully discarded by unsatisfied aquarium enthusiasts. This is in part due because Lionfish require an experienced aquarium owner but are often sold to novices who find their care too difficult. Lionfish have successfully adapted to the coastal waters of the Atlantic in less than a decade and they pose a major threat to reef ecological systems in these areas. The ecological damage caused by Pterois is born from their impact on prey population numbers therefore directly affecting food chain relationships; leading to reef deterioration and negatively influencing Atlantic species diversity. Lionfish have already been shown to overpopulate reef areas and display aggressive tendencies forcing native species to move to waters where conditions might be less than desirable. Because the Lionfish thrive in the Atlantic and the Caribbean's nutrient-rich waters while also enjoying a lack of natural predators the species has spread rapidly. A single Lionfish can reduce young juvenile reef fish populations by 79%. LIONFISH SANDWICH ANYONE? In 2010, NOAA began a campaign to encourage the consumption of the fish. The "Lionfish as Food" campaign encourages human hunting of the fish as the only form of control known to date. Encouraging the consumption of Lionfish could not only help to maintain a reasonable population density, but also provide an alternative fishing source to other overfished populations, such as grouper and snapper. NOAA also encourages people to report Lionfish sightings, to help track Lionfish population dispersal. When properly filleted, the naturally venomous fish is safe to eat. The NOAA calls the Lionfish a "delicious, delicately flavored fish" similar in texture to grouper. Recipes for Lionfish include deep frying, ceviche, jerky, and grilling. So there you go… if you can catch one without getting stung… you can find recipes for how to cook them. I personally would rather just see them as I did at the Atlantis Resort – behind a wall of glass in an aquarium display. © Copyright 2010-2015, Jon Patrick Hyde, All Rights Reserved.
Tại sao đất nước Hàn Quốc thu hút người Việt?
Nhắc tới Hàn Quốc hầu như ai cũng biết , đây là đất nước phát triển thuộc top hàng đầu châu Á song song với Nhật Bản. Trong những năm gần đây số lượng lao động và học sinh đăng ký đi sang nước này làm việc và học tập đang ngày một tăng. Với môi trường sống hiện đại kinh tế phát triển thì không có gì lạ khi Hàn Quốc luôn thu hút người nước ngoài tới. So với VN thì đồng tiền Hàn Quốc cũng có giá trị cao hơn, chúng ta hãy cùng xem 1 tỷ won bằng bao nhiêu tiền Việt nhé. Các bạn trẻ sang Hàn Quốc với chương trình du học tự túc hay đi theo học bổng đều có những ưu nhược điểm riêng, trường học tại đây có chất lượng giáo dục hàng đầu nên đây là cơ hội tuyệt vời cho những ai yêu thích xứ sở kim chi. Ngược lại với chương trình du học, XKLD Hàn Quốc lại đang bị hạn chế vì luật quy định của quốc gia này sau khi tình trạng lao động Việt bỏ trốn quá nhiều. Chúng ta đều biết xuất khẩu lao động Mỹ lương cao nhưng không đi được cho nên đi làm việc tại HQ hay Nhật là sự lựa chọn tốt nhất cho người lao động Việt. Hàn Quốc không chỉ có nền giáo dục tiên tiến có nhiều trường Đại học lọt tốp đầu Châu Á và thế giới, tới đây du học sinh được tiếp cậnđời sống văn hóa đa dạng phong phú, học tập và trải nghiệm môi trường sống hiện đại. Hàn Quốc cũng có nhiều phong cảnh đẹp, thu hút khách tham quan du lịch từ các nước. Thu nhập 1 tháng tại quốc gia này cũng cao gấp nhiều lần so với tại VN. Đây cũng là một trong những lý do người lao động Việt mong muốn sang đây làm việc. Xem thêm: đất nước Qatar
How Do I Get a Hold of Emirates
Travelers can hold their flight reservations online using the official Emirates website. Travelers need to visit the official Emirates website and navigate to the reservations options.  Travelers can stick to the below-mentioned ways to hold reservations on Emirates.  1. Open your web browser and navigate to the official website of Emirates. 2. Navigate to the reservation tab or select the “flights” option. 3. Start your reservation by selecting the flight type from the available options such as one-way, round-trip, or multi-city. 4. Enter the name of the destination or airport, followed by the arrival destination and airport.  5. Select the travel dates from a drop-down list.  6. Enter the total number of passengers that are going to accompany you on your flight.  7. Select the class for travel with Emirates from the available options.  8. Select the “search flight” option and proceed further.  9. Travelers will find flight options listed on another page. Select a flight from the options.  10. Proceed to the payments page.  11. Select the “hold reservation” option on the payments page to hold the Emirates fare for the flight.  The steps mentioned above are an apt answer to how do I get a hold of Emirates. Travelers can connect with the customer service department to grab more details related to Emirates flight hold. The reservation remains on hold for 24 hours. Travelers can continue the reservation by paying the reservation charges online to complete the booking.  Travelers can reach the customer service professional for help and assistance with holding flight reservations with Emirates.
Must-try Lousiana-style crabs in Bali
Bali is one of the best places to enjoy seafood in Indonesia. Jimbaran, for example, has long been one of the island's most popular spots to savor this particular dish while enjoying an amazing sunset. For those longing for Lousiana-style seafood, there are at least two crab restaurants available in Bali; allowing you to eat with your bare hands on the table, without any fancy plates and cutlery to bother you. The Holy Crab Following its popularity in Jakarta as the 'it' place to eat Alaskan crab, Bali's Holy Crab on Jl. Petitenger No. 50 offers a great combination of world-class seafood and traditional Louisiana cooking techniques in a chic yet cozy dining atmosphere. “There has been such a great response to The Holy Crab from food lovers in Jakarta that we are bringing the whole concept and experience to Bali. It has always been a dream of mine to be a part of the island's culinary scene, which has a broader international audience,” said The Holy Crab owner as well as executive chef Albert Wijaya. Choices available on the main menu include Dungeness crab, king crab legs, snow crab legs and lobster with prices ranging from Rp 88,000 (US$7) per 100 grams for the Dungeness crab to Rp 120,000 for the king crab legs -- all served in a delicious secret recipe sauce with mild, medium and hot levels of spiciness. Sausages and corn are also available as additional dishes. According to Albert, the restaurant's crustaceans are imported straight from Alaska and some are from Indonesia. Crab Bar Situated on Jl. Batu Belig 106 in Seminyak , the Crab Bar was founded by famous Indonesian chef Ragil Imam Wibowo in August 2014 with the aim of becoming the first destination for people seeking to savor Lousiana-style seafood on the island. “In Bali, if people want to eat pork, they will head straight to Ibu Oka. We want that to happen to us too; we want to become the first place people recommend when they talk about eating crab in Bali,” said the restaurant's general manager Don Domingo. For newcomers, the Crab Bar's most popular dish is CB's Hot Bag which consists of 500 grams of mud crab, 150 grams of prawn, 200 grams of yabbies (Australian freshwater crustaceans) or clams, sausages and corn. A portion costs Rp 495,000. The CB’s Cold Platter, priced at Rp 450,000, is also recommended with cold Mud Crab, 200 grams of prawn, 200 grams of clams and four pieces of oyster or yabbies. The Crab Bar offers six types of sauce for its hot-platter menus with three levels of spiciness (mild, medium and TNT). The choices include original Lousiana-style with smoked Cajun butter, oriental-style CB’s Bali Sauce, Bangka curry sauce, chili sauce, teriyaki black pepper and garlic butter. While for the cold platter menus, foodies can try garlic mayo, tomato tartar and tom yam mayo sauce. - See more at: http://www.jakpost.travel/news/must-try-lousiana-style-crabs-in-bali-otImxpP0OU7Hu4aJ.html#sthash.rQELFKmb.dpuf
Travel Bucket List
Hey everyone! Ever sense I could remember I have always wanted to travel, it is my dream to see the world and experience everything earth has to offer. This is why I need your help: Help me construct a bucket list by answering this question: What is your most favorite place to go? (vacation or for other reasons) Everyone can give as many places as you want but make sure that it is specific. So if you chose China; What part? Any specific things or places there that make it your favorite? Thank you so much to any who participate, it means a lot to me and I hope one day I can cross off every one of your places off the list. :) If you don't want to be tagged anymore just message me :) Also take a look at @danidee on Vingle! @JPBenedetto @ButterflyBlu @deilig @buddyesd @araiannagorniak1 @NSSagasshi @Taijiotter @VixenViVi @InPlainSight @candyland1986 @MinionPeach17 @PurpleChick @jokes @RaquelArredondo @Marichel @mistymaity @Karthikkrazzy1 @RajeshSamel @GalaxyTacoCat @VeronicaArtino @DeniseiaGardner @B2STANG88 @purplem00n23 @Arellano1052 @shantalcamara @TerrecaRiley @FabiolaGavina @adorkabledolly @CassidyCathell @kpoplover1995 @kisnow @sugajin94 @ElizabethT @ParkMeiFan @netchiBates @fallendendenjr @BluBear07 @EmilyMurphey @loftonc16 @JessicaChaney @WiviDemol @HardikPatel @SreeniNair @missvicky69 @biancaP @tyragallegos10 @EllieDean @esmeraldagutirr @Amye1 @DaniVO @MattK95 @Matokokepa @Narissatayy @CandaceJordan @missophiestik @Animaniafreak @GingerMJones @MauSenpai @crazyflames12 @FallenDeath @ZoeMe @EricaRFonseca @AkiraCondry @nikkinjg @doraga @JonPatrickHyde @biancadanica98 @malibella @Safaa12 @DenieceSuit @SarahVanDorn @misskurmet82 @chris98vamg @wjdeogks76 @RobertMarsh @nenegrint14 @Rhia @smnthcarter773 @NoSixJersy @MimiZu17 @jcl4rks0n @vanemunos @MissB82 @VIPforever123 @YessicaCardenas @jiggzy19 @TheGreenEyedPup @vuihi @UrShawol @amobigbang @ChristopherSuta @esha @wllmvns @NishatH @CleoHoney @AimeeH @notgucci3 @JezziCrypt @KellyOConnor @LeilaB @hopeismyanchor @AluSparklez @KiKi29 @VarunNambiar @EdenSisco @EugeneAngleber @LAVONYORK @KendaylBasden @KpopGaby @amandamuska @NerukaWong @BiblioLady
How To Make Mee Goreng Mamak (印度炒面), Fried Noodles with Indo-Malayan Flair
I love Indonesian food. Based on their history and interactions with the rest of Asia, the cuisine has subtle nods to Chinese, Thai, and Indian dishes, but with their own special (and usually nice and spicy) twist. Mee goreng is perhaps my favorite of the Indo-Malayan dishes. From the picture, it looks like a standard chow mein-esque stir fry, but the flavor involved is absolutely incredible and definitely sets it apart from its 'noodle cousins'. (Especially when you top it with fried onion pieces and just the right amount of sesame oil.) Mee goreng is such a popular dish that you can buy instant packages of it all over Asia. In fact, I have some friends who lived in Western Africa that enjoyed instant mee goreng as a steady staple through the week. (You can buy instant mee goreng at a majority of Asian supermarkets in America, but try this recipe for the real deal and super authentic stuff!) ------------------------------------------------------ Mee Goreng Mamak (Fried Noodles) 500 grams of yellow noodles Handfuls of beansprouts depend on liking 2 small tomatoes, quartered 2 small onions, chopped Handful of chicken breast meat, thinly sliced, or minced beef 2 eggs, lightly beaten 1 potato, boiled and cut into cubes 1 small size dry bean curd, cut into small pieces 3 tablespoons of cooking oil (I usually use soybean.) 1 tablespoons of minced green onion and garlic 2 fish cakes, sliced (optional) Handful of shrimp, de-shelled and de-veined, optional 1 green chili or Thai chili or red cut chili, optional 3 tablespoons of ketchup 3 tablespoons of chili sauce or chili paste 1 tablespoon of dark soy sauce 1 tablespoon of light soy sauce 1 teaspoon of garam masala/curry/turmeric powder, optional (but highly recommended!) For garnishing (optional): Some cucumber slices Some fresh coriander leaves or green onion Some lime or Calamansi lime (cut into half) Some deep fried shallots Some grounded peanut + sugar mixture Sesame oil 1. Assemble all the ingredients that need to chopped or sliced. In a big frying pan, sauté the onion and minced garlic until fragrant. Add in turmeric or Garam Masala (if preferred). Add the chicken breast/minced beef, stir fry for 1-2 minutes. Add the dry bean curd, fish cakes and potato cubes. 2. Add in the yellow noodles and stir fry until well mixed. If the yellow noodles is too dry, add about 1/4 cup of water. Add the tomatoes, prawns, tomato ketchup, chili sauce or paste, freshly cut green/red chili (if any). Stir fry until well combined (about 2-3 minutes). 3. Add in the beaten egg, sugar and salt to taste, followed by the beans sprout. Stir fry until the beaten eggs dries up. Off the heat and transfer to the serving plate. Top with sesame oil to taste.
The story behind the most expensive gourmet coffee in the world: Kopi luwak
The life of a civet cat, strangely known as the coffee rat in Indonesia or tree dog on the Indian subcontinent, is not at all that bad. In the wild, they are free to roam anywhere they fancy, from the tropical forests of Sri Lanka all the way to the dense jungles of Sumatra. They are solitary creatures for most of their lives, but are persnickety eaters and thus discard rotten fruit and diseased mammals. The males get together with their female counterparts whenever they have to, receiving the better end of the deal by mating with no strings attached. They are nocturnal save for when a bright moon comes out. Then they sleep all night like they normally do during the day. And as long as their intestinal tracts remain fully functioning, they will continue pooing out a tradable commodity, one that also happens to produce the most expensive gourmet coffee in the world: the kopi luwak. There are over a hundred types of coffee in the world but only three -- Arabica, robusta and liberica -- are farmed exhaustively and made commercially available. The luwak coffee can be made from all three types but result in varying tastes. The Arabica bean in Indonesia is the most popular for the luwak blend, as well as for non-specialty coffee consumption. With a name like “cat-poo-ccino” and Jerry Seinfeld’s blunt “cat shit coffee” description from his hit TV show, Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, the luwak and its history in Indonesia is nevertheless by no means a laughing matter. Before the introduction of coffee plantations, civet cats and coffee production were an unlikely pair. The civet cat was in fact a creepy pest scurrying over rooftops and eating prize-winning tajen cocks. Their utility hadn’t been explored at all as coffee “fermenters” and their fecal matter was a mere inconvenience to the villager, as is dog crap to the jogger in New York City. The luwak’s prodigious poo-coffee discovery came when the Dutch launched their cultuurstelsel program of enforced coffee planting in Java in the 19th century. Due to exploitative practices, the local indigenous workers were forbidden to enjoy the fruits of their own labor. Of course, prohibition piques interest and so the workers gave their beans a go, but only after they were passed through the guts of the civets running amok on the plantation fields. Fast-forward one hundred and some years. In 2012, the value of coffee exports from Indonesia reached US $1.5 Billion. Seventy percent of Indonesia’s total coffee production was exported, yet how much the luwak contributed to that figure is largely unknown. Regardless, being a highly sought after specialty blend, cat poo coffee has proven to be a lucrative business attracting global consumers for its rich taste, as well as its novelty factor -- sometimes more of the latter than the former. Its labor-intensive production process, as well as scarcity on the global market, drives up its price to anywhere from $300 to $600 per kilogram, making it the most expensive coffee in the world. A cup in the US can go anywhere from $50 to $80. Though coffee estates are seeing a decline in Indonesia, large-scale “wild-sourced” luwak plantations are still in operation, mostly in Sumatra. There are also the small backyard ventures popping up here and there that are proving to be quite profitable enterprises. Harmoni Bali Organik is an example of a successful homegrown luwak plant run by Kadek Ardhi, 54, and Santhi, 51 -- a husband and wife team. They operate right from their traditional Balinese home in Bangli where civet cats roam naturally in the forests and are even brought in by farmers in exchange for a 25-kilogram bag of rice. Unlike the coffee’s history, Kadek and Santhi’s roots in the business are not as deep. “In 2006, I had a Japanese visitor who recommended I merge business with pleasure,” says Kadek, 54, while sliding a tray of Arabica cherries into a civet cat’s cage. “At that time I had only two civets and I kept them just for fun. But he recommended that I breed them and so my capacity quickly grew to 18. Every month I was visited by my Japanese friend who inspected the cages -- now I have 94 luwak and I export my special coffee to Canada and Japan.” The production of kopi luwak is by no means a complicated process. The civet cat sleeps all day with their eyes creepily open and wakes up around sundown. Santhi and her team then begin sliding trays of about a kilogram of Arabica cherries to each cat for dinner. They gorge until satiated, defecate, circle their cages for a bit and then go back to sleep. It was a surprise to see that they meticulously sift through the best cherries -- a selling point that inflates their price tags because of this ability to distinguish good beans from bad. Surprisingly, they spit out the fruit, which is then collected and used as organic fertilizer -- sometimes even dumped on the side of the road next to the plantations where the cherries originated. Their feces are collected in a sieve from right under them in the mornings. The cleaning process begins by laying out the feces on trays in the open sun. “We don’t use water in cleaning the feces,” says Santhi. “The sun does the cleaning through drying and it takes anywhere from one to two weeks, depending on the sun.” Much debate surrounds the luwak coffee’s taste, with many experts asserting that the quality is in fact quite poor and nothing to be excited about. Some connoisseurs swear over the coffee and will go out of their way to make a purchase. Some claim the taste to be less bitter and earthier, yet the overall quality and robustness of flavor varies widely region by region. For Santhi, luwak coffee from Java and Sumatra is spicy while from Kintamani it is a bit more acidic. Nowadays, the kopi luwak can be seen as a business model of micro-economy interconnectedness. Take Santhi and Kadek Ardhi’s plant, for example. Coffee cherries are purchased from a Kintamani farmer and arrive every day at the same time before sundown: two bags weighing anywhere from 95 to 100 kilograms. They hire local help to feed and tend the cats, maintain the cages and package the final product, which then goes to what many might consider a sampling showroom, or sales point, for tourists, in a forest near Ubud. However, one drawback to luwak production is that the Arabica bean is ripe from April to June in lower altitudes (700 to 900 meters) and from April until September in higher altitudes (900 to 1200 meters or even more), such as in Kintamani. Despite a season-dependent output, Santhi and Kadek still manage to produce 25 kilograms per month for the international market, as well as 50 kilograms for the domestic one. However, luwak or not, the irony is that coffee in Indonesia appears to be unpopular. According to investment statistics in 2012 the per capita consumption was relatively low at 0.95 kilograms, compared to Finland where it was 11.7 kilograms. Unscientifically and by observation only, it seems that the artificial variety is preferred by Indonesian consumers, a powdery kind, which in fact has less coffee and more sugar with creamer -- a blend that is atrociously sweet and lacks real flavor and effect. Coffee culture has yet to catch up, although domestic numbers are slowly growing. All in all, the luwak coffee, or any other Indonesian-grown coffee for that matter, is worth boasting about and for thumbing the nation’s nose at the ex-colonizers.