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The surviving human puppet show in Senen, Jakarta

Other than its engaging human puppet shows, the Wayang Orang Bharata group's struggle to survive is an interesting story.
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@billnye it is for tourists.
Really cool, is this for tourists or a real tradition?
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Make A Fist. Then Read This Card.
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