thecypresspoint
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𝐃𝐢𝐬𝐜 𝐠𝐨𝐥𝐟 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐚 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐚.

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Easy Exercise Idea: Hit The Driving Range!
It's been raining in California for about two weeks now. It's great for the drought, but bad for outdoor activities. Californians love being outside, and as a native myself sometimes I'm not sure that I belong. One activity I love doing though, is hitting golf balls or playing if I have the time. Something funny that a lot of people don't know about me is, that I'm a pretty damn good golfer. I competed at the high school level, and almost played in college too. Girls didn't take me seriously at first because I didn't belong to a country club and I didn't dress or act like them. I walked around with my hat on crooked and the collar of my golf shirt popped. I was pure rock and roll, and they were pure bread. Once I hit the ball though, they changed their tune. Once I started beating them...they got even more jealous. I was on a junior tour and won a few pretty cool trophies. I went to the Ohio State tournament and shot a career low in sectionals. I love golf. I used to resent it when I was competing because of the pressure. But now I use it to clear my head. My Grumpy Dad sent my golf clubs across the country so I could finally get back to doing my thing. The rain nearly stopped me from doing it though. But for an hour I had fun. I felt that odd feeling of not belonging once I hit the range. Lots of collared shirts and stuffy glances, perfectly pleated kaki pants and expensive sun glasses. I remembered how I felt when I got on the tee in tournaments. And then I remembered that I'm a badass golfer. So I just hit the ball. Some of them were awesome, and some weren't that great. But it didn't matter. Golfing is hard. In my opinion, it is the hardest sport to play. It requires a lot of skill, concentration and brain power. But when you're just hanging with friends out in the sunshine, swinging your club and getting out your frustrations, it can be amazing, cleansing. Plus, it's great exercise, and it tones the hell out of your arms, stomach and back! So, if you're bored, head to the driving range and buy a bucket of balls. You can even rent clubs at some places too. Get your frustrations out, find your swing and go!
My Grumpy Dad Makes Friends In Florida, Chaos Ensues
My sister Perris plays a softball tournament every year in Florida, a place that's home to sunshine and a lot of retirees. My dad takes a little vacation around that time every year too, masked as an opportunity to watch Perris play. Yeah, we all know the score. Anyway, dad likes to play golf. So of course when you get out of the freezing cold in Ohio and into the sunshine of Florida you're going to play. You might think golf is boring, but you're sorely mistaken. What happens, however; is one of the craziest Grumpy Dad stories yet. Welcome back Grumpy Dad! We've missed you! *** I miss Philadelphia sometimes. It’s a place that defined culture shock for me. That’s for sure. I had grown up in West Michigan before working in North Texas, West Texas, Southeastern Arizona and Southern California. None of those places had prepared me for the land of cheese steaks and water ice when I moved there in 1995. For five years, I marveled at the unwavering loyalty the locals showed for their city. I don’t think I’ve ever run into anyone anywhere who told me they were from Philadelphia—unless I was in Philadelphia (or South Jersey). In other words, people from Philly live and die in Philly. They spend their lives rooting for the Eagles (pronounced ‘Iggles.’) and mispronouncing “water” by calling it “wooter.” They revere Rocky (I, II, III, IV and V); Dr. J; and every member of the Broad Street Bullies (the 1970s Flyers hockey team). They would heckle their own grandmothers if they took too long in line at the grocery store. They would gladly die for their friends. Sixteen years after leaving Eastern Pennsylvania, I drove to Clermont, Florida last month to watch my number two daughter play softball with her team from Notre Dame College. It was Monday, and the girls’ first game of the day was scheduled for 3 P. M., so I decided to play golf in the morning. I walked into the clubhouse of a course that was less than a mile from the ballpark and asked the man at the counter if he could hook me up with a group that was heading out. He told me to get down to the first tee right away because there was a threesome next up. When I arrived, I introduced myself to Phil, Joe and Steve. They were all in their late sixties, so I was the youngest by a decade. I was also the only good player, so they were happy to invite me to play a scramble. (That’s where everybody hits a tee shot and they choose the best one and everybody plays a shot from there, etc.) They said they’d never shot as well as even par as a threesome, but that with a young, big hitter, they were hopeful. I explained that I hadn’t played since November, but that I’d do my best. As often happens, I was very solid in my first outing of the year, having forgotten all the bad habits acquired over the previous season. As a group, we were two under par after eight holes. During that ninety-minute period, I had learned that all three of them were now living in central Florida, and that two of them were former detectives with the Philadelphia Police Department. Since I’d been a reporter with Channel 10 in Philly for five years while they were still working, we discovered that we had many friends and acquaintances in common. Lots of stories ensued. Steve even called a reporter from the Philadelphia Fox station that we both knew and we had a nice conversation while I waited to hit a tee shot. We hadn’t spoken since 1999. What a great time I was having with my new friends from the old neighborhood. And then it happened. There was a bit of a backup on the ninth tee. The group in front of us consisted of two men, a woman and a teenage girl who’d been getting lessons along the way from one of the men. They were slow. As we waited for the woman to hit her shot from the ladies’ tee about sixty yards in front of us, the Philly guys were bantering back and forth about something in their usual raised voices. The woman stopped her address of the ball, backed away and turned to holler, “Could you keep it down!?” No one said anything out loud to her, but we all quietly mumbled things like, “She must have rabbit ears to hear us from that far away.” And, “Who does she think she is? Michelle Wie?” After she hit her shot, and the men hit theirs, we waited until they had almost reached the green of the par four hole before hitting ours. Phil and I were riding in a cart together and we picked up his ball before driving to mine, which was going to be the one the group would play. Just then, we saw Steve and Joe driving all the way to the green. Both jumped out of their cart and walked up to one of the men from that group. “What the hell?” I exclaimed. “What are they doing?” “I have no idea,” said the former detective. We watched from 150 yards away as Steve appeared to be taking a swing at the guy. “Do you think we should go back him up?” I asked. “Nah. Steven can handle it,” Phil assured me. Steve was about 70 years old. He was only about 5’ 9” and maybe 160 pounds. He was also wearing a thick back brace and walked with a bit of a limp. “Are you sure?” I asked. “That guy looks pretty big.” “I’m sure,” said Phil, who stood 6’ 3” and weighed at least 250. A minute later, we saw Steven and Joe get back into their cart. They drove down the fairway and stopped near our cart. Each got out and grabbed a club to hit a shot. Neither said a word about what had happened on the green. Finally, I asked, “What the heck was that about up there?” Steve addressed his ball and hit it up the fairway about a hundred yards. “The son of a bitch told me to go fuck myself, so I clipped him on the chin,” said the other former detective. “You hit him?” I asked, with a bit of misplaced astonishment. “Hell yeah,” said Steve. “What was I supposed to do?” We finished the nine holes at one under par. The man from the pro shop drove out and told us that considering what had happened, it might be best if we called it a day. He gave us all a coupon for a free 18 holes. I told the guys it was great meeting them and playing with them and said we should do it again next year. They agreed. Maybe next year I’ll miss Philly again enough to be reminded of it by my new friends.
Top 10 times animals stole the show on the PGA golf tour
Sometimes, animals just want to steal the spotlight, and that's just what happened many times during the PGA tour. It's time to meet the animals stealing the show at the PGA Tour! #10 Bees swarm in New Orleans Nothing like a great swarm of bees to make even the toughest golfers duck for cover. As the commentators said, "You just don't see that everyday." Very true, very true. #9 Duck wants the ball When a duck wants the ball, it's going to get the ball. Unless you have a trusty golf caddy to scatter granola to lure it away from the ball. 10 points to the golf caddy. #8 Iguana alert! At the Puerto Rican Open, a large iguana (those animals are huge) took interest in the golf ball for a few seconds and then decides it isn't worth his time. #7 Hawk vs. Microphone In the hawk's mind: if it looks like a mouse and feels like a mouse, it has to be a mouse, right? Well, unfortunately for the hawk, humans have created large furry microphones that have a very similar appearance to mice. The microphones probably don't taste quite as delicious to the hawk. #6 Alligator stroll When you play golf for a while, you get to know the animals that enjoy disrupting the game. This is one of those animals that is a regular at New Orleans games. They call him "Tripod" because he is missing part of his front leg. Here in this picture, golfer Davis Love III is trying to take a picture of Tripod with his phone. I guess there are celebrities in all species. #5 Diving turtle Apparently this turtle became bored with the golf game and decided to start doing a different sport: diving! He teeters on the ledge of this bridge and then makes a plunging dive to the stream below. Unfortunately, he made a little too much of a splash for a winning dive. #4 When a turtle's got to go, a turtle's going to go Yet, another turtle encounter made the list. This one was less than thrilled about being picked up and removed from the course, so it let a stream of pee out while it was being carried away. That's one way to show you're upset with the situation. #3 "Nope, it's my ball now." When a ball falls into enemy territory, the golfer may never get it back. This is what happened at RBC Heritage when a ball fell down towards a pond and an alligator decided it was his ball to keep. The caddy pushed the alligator back into the pond, but the ball was not returned. #2 Tiger Woods and Sammy, the Squirrel At the 2013 Presidents Cup, Lindsey Von (Tiger Woods' girlfriend at the time) decides Tiger needs a visit from Sammy, the Squirrel. Nothing like a little playful distraction on the golf course. #1 Seagull wants a souvenir ball During the 1998 Players Championship, an interested seagull decided it wanted a souvenir ball to take home. It pushes and picks up Steve Lowery's ball and then finally gets a good grip on the ball in its mouth and takes flight. Unfortunately for the seagull, the ball dropped out of his mouth right as he was passing over the pond. Better luck next time! Watch this video to see all of the moments from start to finish. To meet more animals taking over the Internet, check out the "Internet famous animals" collection!
Dr. Peter köppel nukleotide
ÜBER -Dr. Peter Köppel. Dr. Peter Köppel hat einen Ph.D. in Biochemie und Immunologie. Er wurde ausgebildet in Biochemie, mit mit besonderem Interesse an klinischer Immunologie, am Institut für Virologie an der Universität Zürich. Danach arbeitete er als Forscher Osteoarthritis und Osteoporose in einem einem pharmazeutischen Unternehmen in Basel. Als geschäftsführender Direktor von Chemoforma und Pro-Bio in der Schweiz, hat Dr. Köppel seit über 20 Jahren die Forschung und Produktion von speziellen Nukleotid Inhaltsstoffen für die Tier- und Humanernährung Ernährung. Dies hat dazu geführt, dass er als als einer der weltweit führenden Experten für Experten für Nukleotide für Gesundheit und Leistung. Nukleotide sind kleine Moleküle, die lange Zeit wenig oder gar nicht beachtet wurden. Dr. Koeppel und sein Team haben in 30 Jahren Forschung und Praxis bewiesen, wie sinnvoll und notwendig die Ergänzung der Ernährung mit Nukleotiden ist. https://vegananatura.ch/pages/uber-vegana-natura WAS SIND NUKLEOTIDEN? Die DNA ist der Bauplan des Lebens, und die Nukleotide sind die Bausteine der Doppelhelix. Nukleotide bestehen aus einer stickstoffhaltigen Base (normalerweise Adenin, Thymin, Cytosin, Guanin oder Desoxyribose) und einer bis drei Phosphatgruppen. DIE QUELLE DER NUKLEOTIDEN Nukleotide können vom Körper de novo aus einigen Aminosäuren synthetisiert werden, zum Beispiel aus Glutamin, Aspartat, Glycin und Formiat6 Nukleotide, Nukleoside, Nukleinsäuren, Basen und Desoxyribose können auch aus dem. DNA- und RNA-Abbau oder aus Lebensmitteln gewonnen und recycelt werden6 Es hat den Anschein, dass die Darmschleimhaut, die hämatopoetischen Zellen des Knochenmarks und die lymphatischen Gewebe nur eine begrenzte Kapazität für die De-novo-Synthese haben und wahrscheinlich eher auf Bergungswege angewiesen sind, die Nukleotide aus der Nahrung oder aus dem DNA- und RNA-Abbau liefern3,7 . Wenn also die exogene Versorgung mit Nukleotiden gering ist, können diese Gewebe Schwierigkeiten haben, ihren Nukleotidbedarf zu decken.
Love It Or Hate It: Live Sporting Events?
Welcome to the Funny Community game, Love It Or Hate It! This game is really similar to Monday's 'No Good or So Good' food game - except this one deals a lot more with non-food things. Every week, I highlight a different thing that a lot of people either really love or really hate and see how our community feels overall! Last week, I asked you how you felt about SELFIE STICKS. It was an EXTREMELY tight vote, but out of the 60 who gave your opinion, 33 of you said that they're actually kind of useful! Soooo... SELFIE STICKS WIN!!!! This week, I want to know: How do you feel about attending live sports games? Spectator sports have been around since the days of Ancient Greece, but the ones we know and love today came into being in the mid 19th century! The number of Americans that attend at least one live sporting event annually is easily in the tens of millions. However, the amount of them that find said sporting event COMPLETELY BORING is still widely unknown. How do YOU feel about spectator sports? Are they tons of fun or brutally boring? Debate, debate, debate! @Inaritricx @Taijiotter @wonyeop316 @AimeeH @XergaB20 @JustinaNguyen @Danse @RainaC3 @bnrenchilada @destiny1419 @arnelli @Luci546 @InPlainSight @Ash2424701 @GingerMJones @zwdodds @LenaBlackRose @misssukyi @TerraToyaSi @kneelb4zod @BrookeStam @RachelParker @JaxomB @ultraninja10 @reyestiny93 @MattK95 @MajahnNelson @petname83 @BluBear07 @melifluosmelodi @ZoilaObregon @GossamoKewen95 @TracyLynnn @TiffanyWallace @VixenViVi @DenieceSuit @ButterflyBlu @CelinaGonzalez @MaighdlinS @maddiemoozer @VeronicaArtino @iixel @TomHawthorne @DominiqueThomas @ElizabethT @RiggaFoster @AluSparklez @kvnguyen @chris98vamg @WiviDemol @animechild51 @2Distracted @cthulu @jazziejazz @JessicaChaney @shantalcamara @J1mbleJ4mz @Beeplzzz @carmaa10 @MayraYanez @Kamiamon @HeatherWright @MischiefK1ng @SeoInHan @ShonA @KennyMcCormick @MooshieBay @IMNII @Ikpoper @humairaa @merryjayne13 @zoemvillarreal @lilleonz @ChristinaOMalle @AllieGrabowski @baileykayleen @KarleyFrance @Ticasensei @EasternShell @musicundefined9 @peahyr @TerrecaRiley @MoisEsGaray @atmi @AlidaGarman @sanRico @orenshani7 @jannatd93 @ReadAnimateSwim @Astrohelix @dimplequeen @ChildofSparda13 @grapetoes2000 @sarahpjane @LittleHorn @justinasarmento @deilig @GalaxyTacoCat @amobigbang @LAVONYORK @Jason41 @kpopdeluxegirl @BlackDragon88 @Bobs @paularasnick @Animaniafreak @YumiMiyazaki @Patmanmeow @MarvelTrashcan @kawaiiporpoise @Xiuyeolhyun @MaggieHolm @xDaisyDaysx
An Ever-Growing Dilemma: Traumatic Brain Injury in Football
Image source: pexels Football is a beloved sport for many Americans. It is full of excitement, passion, and competition. Unfortunately, the game has an ever-growing dilemma that is increasingly difficult to ignore - traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent studies have revealed the long-term health consequences associated with playing football, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). For this reason, players need education on the potential forms of brain injury and at what stage they need a traumatic brain injury lawyer to prove the severity of brain injury. This blog post explores the realities of traumatic brain injury in football from its prevalence among all levels of play to potential solutions for reducing head trauma. We will also discuss why understanding traumatic brain injury laws should be a priority for everyone involved in football whether as a participant or fan. What is traumatic brain injury? Traumatic brain injury is a type of brain injury that occurs when an external force causes damage to the brain. Traumatic brain injury can happen when the head unexpectedly and violently hits an object. It is also prevalent when an object penetrates the skull and enters brain tissue. Symptoms of traumatic brain injury can vary greatly, depending on the severity of the injury. Mild symptoms may include a temporary loss of consciousness or confusion. It can also be severe, such as coma or amnesia. In some cases, traumatic brain injury can lead to long-term problems with cognition, movement, sensation, or emotions. Treatment for traumatic brain injury varies based on the severity of the injury. For milder injuries, rest and over-the-counter pain medications may be all that is needed. However, more severe injuries may require hospitalization and intensive rehabilitation for the individual. There is no definitive answer to preventing traumatic brain injury in football players. Some suggest a change of rules to the sport. For example, banning tackling in practice or banning certain types of hits during games may help reduce the risk of TBI. Others believe that improved equipment design, such as better helmets that better protect the head from impact, may also help reduce the risk of traumatic brain injury. That is why it is important to know some traumatic brain injury laws to find what is truly permitted in the sport and when you might need to consult a personal injury lawyer. Traumatic Brain Injury Laws The case of a traumatic brain injury may form the basis of a legal inquiry. This is applicable in cases where the actions or inactions of one party cause another to sustain a brain injury. Legal inquiries can proceed based on the following theoretical laws, these may include: A case of negligence Medical malpractice Assault Trip and fall All of the aforementioned above may necessitate legal action. For instance, in the case of trip and fall or slip and fall, such cases may occur from uneven floors, clustered walking surfaces, or inadequate lighting. In any case, alongside medical personnel, you need the expertise of a traumatic brain injury lawyer to ascertain the causation of the accident. This ensures all medical records, facts, and evidence of your brain injury are well covered so you can focus on recovery. The Dangers of Traumatic Brain Injury Football as a sport traditionally values toughness, and this often results in collisions between players. As the number of reported concussions in football continues to rise, so does the concern over the long-term effects of traumatic brain injury. TBI can lead to a wide range of problems, including: Memory loss Depression Anxiety Problems with coordination and balance In severe cases, it can even lead to dementia or death. There are a variety of factors that can contribute to the severity of a traumatic brain injury. Many of which include the force of the impact and the angle at which the head is hit. This determines whether or not the person loses consciousness. Repeated head trauma is another major factor, as it can lead to cumulative damage. It is impossible to eliminate the risk of traumatic brain injury in football. But some measures can be taken to reduce its occurrence. These include: Better helmets and mouthguards Stricter return-to-play guidelines More comprehensive sideline concussion protocols The long-term effects of traumatic brain injury are also disconcerting. Studies have linked TBI with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Other research has suggested that TBI may contribute to the development of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is a degenerative brain condition that has been found in many former football players. The potential consequences of suffering a TBI are serious enough that every effort should be made to reduce the risk of injury. This starts with proper training and equipment for all levels of play from youth leagues to the professional ranks. It also includes adopting rule changes aimed at reducing contact between players, for example, banning or limiting certain types of contact. How to Prevent Traumatic Brain Injury? The best way to prevent traumatic brain injury is to avoid head trauma. This can be done by wearing properly fitting protective equipment, such as helmets and mouthguards during all sports and recreational activities. Some steps can be taken to reduce the risk of traumatic brain injury if head trauma does occur. For example, prompt medical attention can help to ensure that any resulting swelling or bleeding is quickly controlled. In addition, rehabilitation and cognitive therapies can help those who have suffered a TBI to regain some or all of their previous functioning. Conclusion Traumatic brain injury in football is a growing dilemma that cannot be ignored. Even with all of the advances in safety protocols, athletes and their families remain at risk as long as they participate in contact sports such as football. It is essential for everyone involved from parents to coaches to medical personnel to take steps to ensure that player safety remains paramount. No one else has to suffer an injury due to negligence or ignorance. We must keep searching for ways to protect our athletes and make sure that this ever-growing dilemma does not go unresolved.