Nisfit
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Great Wall Marathon, Tianjin, China

While some people may dream of walking the entire Great Wall, others choose to RUN the entire structure. This is not for the beginning marathon runner, there are stairs and hills involved! "If visiting the Great Wall of China is on your bucket list and you’re a glutton for punishment, then this marathon may be for you. Runners should expect the race to take about 50 percent longer to complete than an average marathon due to extreme ascents and descents (there is an 8-hour time limit). The route starts near the village of Huangyaguan, a couple hours northeast of Beijing, and heads straight to the Wall. While going up and down the 5,164 steps of the millennia-old structure, you can expect stunning 360-degree views of China’s countryside. The course then heads through scenic villages and rice fields before looping back to the Wall again for the final portion of the race, when you’ll finish in the center of Yin and Yang Square. Check in here: In order to participate in the Great Wall Marathon, you’ll have to book a marathon package (unless you are a resident of China) through a travel agency."
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Can I I go and watcchh?? hehe
@nisfit haha I think it's cool but i don't know if i would ever want to participate :P
@imliz @nokcha exactly what I was thinking!
Oh man I've never been to China but if I do go this looks like a great way to see the Great Wall!! ^^
looks fun, but not for me haha
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